Title:
1-4 Player bulls eye putting game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable putting game is discussed whereas one to four players compete in three unique games to get the best score. Each player chooses from four colored balls (red, white, yellow, blue) and attempts to score points by aiming at a Bulls Eye Target, which surrounds a hole. Bumper edge rails are used to keep the balls on the playfield and can be used for strategic trick shots. The game can be easily set up in many configurations indoors or outdoors depending on the space available to play by using interlocking base puzzle pieces and bumper edge rails. In addition the game can be easily taken apart and stored in a carry all bag that will allow the players to take the game anywhere.



Inventors:
Miller, Fred B. (Long Beach, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/297482
Publication Date:
06/14/2007
Filing Date:
12/08/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Fred B. Miller (Long Beach, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A portable 1-4 player Bulls Eye Pulling Game to be played with twelve multi-colored balls, a scoreboard, a Bulls Eye Target and a standard miniature golf putter.

2. A portable 1-4 player Bulls Eye Putting Game wherein players can play up to three separate and unique games by aiming at a Bulls Eye Target.

3. A portable 1-4 player Bulls Eye Putting Game wherein the base pieces and bumper edge rails can be easily connected like a puzzle into many different configurations based on the amount of available space to play. The bumper edge rails are designed to keep the balls on the playfield and allow the players to hit trick shots by bouncing off the side rails.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

The invention relates to the game of golf, in particular a portable, indoor, outdoor, to four player competitive putting game.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Description of Prior Art

There have been many golf products that simulate the aspect of putting. Most are too large, difficult to set up and break down, and hard to carry around or store. Many are designed to have one shape or size, while others are designed specifically as training devices with a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss. The following eight prior patents were discovered in the pertinent field regarding the present invention.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,735,988 issued to Donald J. Palmer, Mark L. Palmer, Irwin A. Breinin on May 29, 1973 uses Velcro to connect the putting mats together. It is played by aiming at a hole in the mat and has a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,892,405 issued to Trevino; Manuel C. on Jul. 1, 1975 is designed to serve as a standard training device with one size and configuration and a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,596,391 issued to Carolan, Jr.; Leo P. on Jun. 24, 1986 is designed to serve as a standard training device with one size and configuration and a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,934,704 issued to Mazer; William on Jun. 19, 1990 utilizes a flexible and flat rug that is rolled out to play the game. This design limits the game to only one size and configuration. It has no rails to keep the balls from going off the game board and no hole for the ball to fall into.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,201,521 issued to Healy; Charles W. on Apr. 13, 1993 is designed to serve as a standard training device with one size and configuration and a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,749,789 issued to Karl; James S. on May 12, 1998 uses a flexible interlocking engagement with hook-like projections to connect several putting mats together. The mats are relatively flat and are rolled up for storage. It uses a retaining rail, which is fastened down to the mat by connecting a fastening device through a hole in the mat. It is played by aiming at an “elevated” target surface instead of a hole in the mat.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,863,256 issued to MacLean; John J. on Jan. 26, 1999 utilizes a continuous length of artificial grass that is stored in a roll and rolled out over panels to play the game. This design limits the game to only one size and configuration. The putting area starts level with the ground and then angles upward to allow the ball to drop into a hole. It has a simple game design: putt at the hole to receive a hole in one or miss.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,837,798 issued to Medcalf; Roger K. on Jan. 4, 2005 is designed to be one size and configuration. It has no rails to keep the balls from going off the game board and no hole for the ball to fall into. It is relatively flat and rolled up for storage.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One of the key elements of the present invention is the addition of a Bulls Eye Target surrounding the hole. The Bulls Eye Target along with twelve multi-colored golf balls (red, white, yellow, blue) and a scoreboard allow the player to play three unique and competitive games (in the hole, shuffle board putting, bumper putting). A second key element is the ease to set up and break down the game thanks to the interlocking base pieces and bumper edge rails. The bumper edge rails are specifically designed to interlock like a puzzle to the base pieces, which will allow a variety of game configurations based on the space available to play. A final key element is the compact carrying case, which will allow the player to easily store all the parts of the game.

The foregoing and other objects of the invention will become more apparent during the following disclosure and by referring to the drawings, in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an overall perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

FIG. 2 is a side view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces and bumper edge rail.

FIG. 3 is top plan view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces and bumper edge rail.

FIG. 4 is a detailed perspective view of the bumper edge rail.

FIG. 5 is an overall exploded perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

FIG. 6 is an alternate exploded perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game with a second version of the bumper edge rails.

FIG. 7 is an alternate exploded perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game with a third version of the bumper edge rails.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces and the indoor/outdoor carpeting.

FIG. 10 is a side view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces and the indoor/outdoor carpeting.

FIG. 11-17 are a top down view of seven separate game configurations for the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

FIG. 18 is a front view of the scoreboard for the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game carrying case.

FIG. 20 is an exploded perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game carrying case.

FIG. 21 contains four pictures of a working prototype for the Bulls Eye Putting Game.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an overall perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game. It shows the main features of the game including the base puzzle pieces 1, the indoor/outdoor carpeting 2, the bumper edge rails 3, the finished edge pieces 4, and the bulls eye target 5.

FIG. 2 is a side view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces 1, the indoor/outdoor carpeting 2, and the bumper edge rails 3.

FIG. 3 is a top down view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces 1, the indoor/outdoor carpeting 2, and the bumper edge rails 3.

FIG. 4 is a bottom perspective view that shows the bumper edge rails 3 in detail. The bumper edge rails 3 are designed to interlock easily with the base pieces 1,2 (for purposes of this document, the reference to base pieces 1,2 refers to a combination of the base puzzle pieces 1, and the indoor/outdoor carpeting 2). One function of the bumper edge rail 3 is to keep the balls from dropping off the playing surface. A second purpose is that they can be used strategically in the game by bouncing the balls off the bumper edge rail 3 so as to avoid balls that are blocking the target area or hole. The bumper edge rail 3 will be made out of a rubbery material so as to make banking trick shots possible.

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game. It illustrates the relative positions of the base puzzle pieces 1, to the indoor/outdoor carpeting 2, to the bumper edge rails 3. The finished edge pieces 4 (FIG. 1) are used to complete the base puzzle piece 1 edge where the bumper edge rails 3 are not needed.

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view, which shows a second embodiment of the bumper edge rails. This version uses bumper edge rails 7 that will be connected to the base pieces 1,2 by fastening screws 8 or other type of fastening bolt.

FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view, which shows a third embodiment of the bumper edge rails. This version uses high-quality industrial rubber bands 9, which will be stretched and placed over rubber band stands 10 to create the bumper rails.

FIG. 8 is a top down view of the Bulls Eye Putting Game, which illustrates the design of the bulls eye target 5. The first inner target area 5b is yellow & is worth three points, the second middle target area 5c is red and worth two points and the third outer target area 5d is blue and worth one point. Within the center of the target is a two-inch deep hole 5a. If the player gets a “hole in one” they receive six points.

FIG. 9 is a top down view showing the four bulls eye target base pieces 1,2a, 1,2b, 1,2c, 1,2d. One-quarter of the bulls eye target 5 is spray-painted directly onto four of the indoor/outdoor carpeting pieces 2 and when they are connected together they form one complete bulls eye target 5.

FIG. 10 shows a perspective view of the base puzzle pieces 1 in relation to the indoor/outdoor carpeting pieces 2. The indoor/outdoor carpeting pieces 2 will be glued to the base puzzle pieces 1, which will be made out of a light weight rubber material.

FIG. 11 is a side view showing the relationship between the base puzzle pieces 1 and the indoor/outdoor carpeting pieces 2.

FIG. 12-18 illustrates seven separate ways that the Bulls Eye Putting Game can be set up based on the amount and/or placement of the base pieces 1,2 and bumper edge rails 3. The base pieces 1,2 and bumper edge rails 3 can be easily connected like a puzzle to create an infinite amount of different size and shape playfields.

FIG. 15 illustrates a smaller version of the Bulls Eye Putting Game whereas the bulls eye target is painted directly onto one bulls eye target base piece 1,2e instead of four bulls eye target base pieces 1,2a, 1,2b, 1,2c, 1,2d. This alternate design will be sold as a separate product and will make the product smaller, cheaper and lighter because there will be fewer base pieces 1,2 contained in the game.

FIG. 19 illustrates a preliminary design for the scoreboard for the Bulls Eye Putting Game. The scoreboard will be a whiteboard with erasable pen or a chalk-board with chalk. It will be hung on a wall or placed on a scoreboard stand to allow players to easily use it while playing. One to four players will write their names 11 on the scoreboard and as they play the game they will write down their scores 12 accordingly.

The right side of the scoreboard show the current game scoring scenario 13 whereas a hole in one is worth six points, the first inner target area 5b is yellow & is worth three points, the second middle target area 5c is red and worth two points and the third outer target area 5d is blue and worth one point. If a player does not reach the target area, the player receives minus one point. This illustration also explains what happens when a ball lands between two target areas 14. When this happens, the player receives the higher point value.

Below the game scoring scenarios are the directions for three current games. Game number one 15 is called “In the hole”. In this game players choose a ball color and take turns hitting all three of their balls from the putting area 6 (FIG. 8). After the points have been scored all balls are cleared from the playfield and the second player goes. If a player gets all three balls in the hole in a row, they receive bonus shots until they miss the hole. The first player to fifty points wins the game.

Game number two 16 is called “Shuffle Board putting”. This game is similar to the game of shuffleboard in that balls remain on the playfield after being hit. Each player alternates hitting their balls until all balls have been hit. Players can use strategy and attempt to hit playfield balls closer or farther from the hole. The first player to fifty points wins the game.

Game number three 17 is called “Bumper Putting”. This game plays like both games one and two except players cannot aim straight at the hole. They can only hit their balls off the bumper edge rails 3 to score points. The first player to fifty points wins the game.

FIG. 20 illustrates a perspective view of the carrying case 18 that will hold the Bulls Eye Putting Game. The carrying case will allow players to easily carry the product anywhere they wish. It can be opened through the use of a zipper 19 or other form of fastening element.

FIG. 21 illustrates an exploded view of the carrying case 18 which shows the two sections of the carrying case: The lower half 23 shows the section where the twelve base pieces 1,2 will be placed. The upper half shows where the remaining parts for the game will be placed 22. The upper section will contain twelve bumper edge rails 3, a standard putter 21, and twelve golf balls 20 (red, white, yellow, blue). It will also contain any remaining parts including the scoreboard and the cup hole (not shown).

FIG. 22 shows four pictures of the actual working prototype of the Bulls Eye Putting Game. In this prototype version the outdoor carpeting comes in a roll and is rolled out to cover the base puzzle pieces.