Title:
Stabilizer loop for garment overlap closures
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention relates to a garment or robe that includes a stabilizer loop for overlap closures. The stabilizer loop is disposed on at least one of the garment's opposing front fabric panels and is adjacent to a peripheral edge of one or more of the front fabric panels. The robe includes a belt that is passed through a stabilizer loop. When a knot is formed from opposing end portions of the belt and the knot engages with the stabilizer loop, it effectively maintains opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other. As a result, the stabilizer loop provides several advantages. It provides improved stability to an overlap garment's closure for reducing slippage effects on the front fabric panels. In addition, the stabilizer loop provides improved alignment of bottom hemlines for a more aesthetic look.



Inventors:
Giglio, Gino (Palm Beach Gardens, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/301532
Publication Date:
06/14/2007
Filing Date:
12/12/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D13/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HALE, GLORIA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Fox Rothschild LLP (Princeton, NJ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A garment that covers at least an upper body portion of a person, comprising: a back fabric panel sized and shaped to extend substantially from a shoulder to an area below a waist of said person, a lower edge of said back fabric panel defining a portion of a hemline of said garment; a pair of opposing front fabric panels, each attached to said back fabric panel and dimensioned for overlapping one another across a person's chest when said garment is worn by said person, each of said front fabric panels having a lower edge defining a portion of said hemline; a stabilizer loop disposed on at least one of said front fabric panels and adjacent to a peripheral edge of said at least one front fabric panel that overlaps a second one of said front fabric panels; and a belt.

2. The garment according to claim 1, wherein said belt passes through one stabilizer loop.

3. The garment according to claim 2, wherein a first portion of said belt is adapted for being knotted to a second opposing portion of said belt.

4. The garment according to claim 2, wherein said belt disposed in said stabilizer loop substantially aligns said opposing front fabric panels so that said portion of said hemline defined by each of said opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other.

5. The garment according to claim 3, wherein a knot formed from said opposing first and second portions of said belt exceeds an aperture size of said stabilizer loop.

6. The garment according to claim 5, wherein an engagement of said knot with said stabilizer loop maintains said opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

7. The garment according to claim 1, wherein said belt passes through said stabilizer loop and said belt disposed in said stabilizer loop aligns said opposing front fabric panels so that said portion of said hemline defined by each of said opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other, and wherein a knot formed from opposing portions of said belt engages said stabilizer loop, said knot maintaining said opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

8. The garment according to claim 1, wherein said belt passes through said stabilizer loop, a frictional engagement of said belt through said stabilizer loop maintains said opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other and substantially aligns said opposing front fabric panels so that said portion of said hemline defined by each of said opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other.

9. The garment according to claim 1, wherein at least one aperture is formed in said garment and positioned for receiving therein an arm of said person wearing said garment.

10. A garment that covers at least an upper body portion of a person, comprising: a back fabric panel sized and shaped to extend substantially from a shoulder to an area below a waist of said person, a lower edge of said back fabric panel defining a portion of a hemline of said garment; a pair of opposing front fabric panels, each attached to said back fabric panel and dimensioned for overlapping one another across a person's chest when said garment is worn by said person, each of said front fabric panels having a lower edge defining a portion of said hemline; at least one aperture formed in said garment and positioned for receiving therein an arm of said person wearing said garment; a stabilizer loop disposed on at least one of said front fabric panels adjacent to a peripheral edge of said at least one front fabric panel that overlaps a second one of said front fabric panels; wherein a belt passes through said stabilizer loop and said belt disposed in said stabilizer loop aligns said opposing front fabric panels so that said portion of said hemline defined by each of said opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other, and wherein a knot formed from opposing portions of said belt engages said stabilizer loop, said knot maintaining said opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

11. A robe, comprising: a pair of opposing front fabric panels arranged to cover a front of a person in an overlapping configuration when said robe is worn; at least one stabilizer loop disposed adjacent to a peripheral edge of at least a first one of said front fabric panels that overlaps a second one of said front fabric panels; and wherein a belt passes through said stabilizer loop, and a combination of said belt and said stabilizer loop positions said opposing front fabric panels so that a bottom peripheral edge defined by each of said opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other.

12. The robe according to claim 11, wherein a knot formed from opposing portions of said belt exceeds an aperture size of said stabilizer loop disposed adjacent to said peripheral edge, wherein an engagement of said knot with said stabilizer loop maintains said opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

13. The robe according to claim 11, wherein said stabilizer loop is disposed on said robe below at least one aperture positioned for receiving therein an arm of said person wearing said robe.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Statement of the Technical Field

The inventive arrangement relates generally to an apparatus for providing improvements to garments with overlap closures. More particularly, the invention provides improved stability to an overlap garment's closure, as well as improved alignment of bottom hemlines.

2. Description of the Related Art

Garments with overlap closures are well known in the clothing art; they date back thousands of years. Such garments are generally designed to cover at least the upper body portion of a person. The garments can be sleeved or sleeveless. The most notable example of such a garment is the conventional bathrobe. The conventional bathrobe is a garment made of towel-like material and is typically worn at home after a bath or other activities where the wearer is nude to keep warm and/or preserve modesty in times of no immediate need to fully dress.

There has been a long-felt need to improve the stability of the closure of such overlap garments. Conventional bathrobes, for example, are secured using a system of belt loops that are attached at the sides of the robe. A belt is typically passed through these loops and the belt ends are tied in a knot to secure the overlapped front panels of the robe. In this arrangement, the overlapping front panels have a tendency to slip away from each other, thus exposing the wearer. This slippage can be due to inevitable conditions, such as the wearer's movements, i.e. walking and the gravitational forces acting on the garment. What is needed is an improved arrangement for reducing the slippage effects on the front fabric panels and for aligning the bottom hemlines of the front panels for a more aesthetic look.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention concerns an improved garment that is designed to cover at least the upper body portion of a person. The garment can comprise a back fabric panel that is sized and shaped to extend substantially from a shoulder to an area below the waist of the person. A lower edge of the back fabric panel can define a portion of a hemline of the garment. A pair of opposing front fabric panels can be each attached to the back fabric panel and dimensioned for overlapping one another across a person's chest when the garment is worn by the person. Each of the opposing front fabric panels, like the back fabric panel, can have a lower edge that defines a portion of the hemline.

According to one aspect, the garment can contain one or more apertures that are formed and positioned for a sleeved or sleeveless configuration. The aperture is positioned to receive an arm of a garment wearer. A plurality of stabilizer loops, can be disposed on one or more front fabric panels and below the apertures. The stabilizer loop can be disposed adjacent to a peripheral edge of one or more of the front fabric panels. The front fabric panel overlaps a second front fabric panel. A belt can be disposed in one of the stabilizer loops.

The belt can pass through one of the stabilizer loop(s). A first portion of the belt can be adapted for being knotted with a second opposing portion of the belt. The belt disposed in the stabilizer loop can substantially align the opposing front fabric panels so that portions of the hemline defined by the lower edges of the opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other. The knot formed from the opposing first and second portions of the belt can exceed an aperture size of the stabilizer loop. An engagement of the knot with the stabilizer loop maintains the opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other. According to one aspect of the invention, the belt disposed in the stabilizer loop can substantially align the opposing front fabric panels due to a frictional engagement of said belt through said stabilizer loop. In addition, the frictional engagement can maintain the opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

According to another embodiment of the invention, a robe can comprise a pair of opposing front fabric panels that can be arranged to cover a person's front in an overlapping configuration when the robe is worn. Apertures can be positioned for receiving an arm of a person who is wearing the robe. According to one aspect, one or more stabilizer loops can be disposed below the apertures and adjacent to a peripheral edge of one or more front fabric panels such that a first one or more front fabric panels can overlap a second one of the front fabric panels.

A belt is disposed through the stabilizer loop. A combination of the belt and the stabilizer loop can position the opposing front fabric panels so that a bottom peripheral edge defined by the each of the opposing front fabric panels are substantially aligned with each other. A knot can be formed from opposing end portions of the belt. The knot can exceed an aperture size of the stabilizer loop; such that an engagement of the knot with the stabilizer loop can maintain the opposing front fabric panels in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front view of a garment in open configuration that is useful for understanding the invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view of a garment in FIG. 1 in closed configuration that is useful for understanding the invention.

FIG. 3 is a back view of the garment in FIG. 2 that is useful for understanding the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 is a front view of an improved garment/robe 100 in its open configuration that is designed to cover at least the upper body portion of a person. The garment 100 can comprise a back fabric panel 109 that is sized and shaped to extend substantially from a shoulder to an area below the waist of the person. The garment 100 may be designed for males, females, or both. A lower edge of the back fabric panel 114 can define a portion of a hemline of the garment 100. A pair of opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 can be each attached to the back fabric panel 109 and dimensioned for overlapping one another across a person's chest when the garment 100 is worn by the person. Each of the opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102, like the back fabric panel 109, can have a first and second lower edge 105, 106 that defines a portion of the hemline. The back fabric panel 109, and first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 can be made of any clothing material, including, but not limited to cotton, terry cloth, wool, silk, satin, nylon, polyester, and leather.

According to one aspect, the garment 100 can contain one or more apertures 104 that are formed and positioned for a sleeved or sleeveless configuration. FIGS. 1-3 all show a short-sleeved configuration, although a long-sleeved or sleeveless configuration is also possible. The aperture 104 is positioned to receive an arm of a garment wearer. One or more stabilizer loops 107 can be disposed on the garment 100 below the apertures 104. The stabilizer loop aperture size can be of any size. However, the stabilizer loop 107 must be of sufficient size to fit a belt 113 through the stabilizer loop 107.

In a preferred embodiment, the stabilizer loop 107 is comprised of generally rectangular strips of fabric material. However, the stabilizer loops 107 can have any shape, including but not limited to rectangular, oval, or circular loops. The stabilizer loops 107 can be disposed on the peripheral edge of either front fabric panels 101 or 102. The garment may also be designed for unisex wear by disposing the stabilizer loop 107 on both peripheral edges of the front fabric panels 101 and 102. The stabilizer loop 107 has a first and second end portion, wherein each stabilizer loop end portion is attached to the garment 100. The stabilizer loop 107 should be attached to the garment 100 such that a belt 113 can be disposed through a gap formed by the attachment of each of the stabilizer loop strip ends with one or both of the garment's front fabric panels 101, 102. Alternatively, the stabilizer loop 107 can be ring-like in shape and be attached to one attachment point on the peripheral edge of front fabric panels 101, 102.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show a stabilizer loop 107 that is disposed on the first front fabric panel 101. In a preferred embodiment, the stabilizer loops 107 can be disposed substantially adjacent to a peripheral edge of either front fabric panel 101 or 102, depending on whether the garment is to be used by a male or female. The placement of the stabilizer loop 107 should be adjacent or close to the peripheral edge of the front fabric panel 101 or 102 in order to provide the best bottom hemline alignment and stability. First and/or second belt end portions 110, 111 can be disposed through the stabilizer loop 107.

The belt 113 and stabilizer loop 107 can be of any textile material, including, but not limited to cotton, terry cloth, wool, silk, satin, nylon, polyester, and leather. The belt 113 should be sufficiently long to allow portions of either belt end 110 and 111 to be knotted together. Moreover, the width and thickness of the belt 113 does not have to be of any particular size. However, the belt should be able to pass through the stabilizer loop 107. The belt 113 should not be too thick as to not allow a knot 112 to be formed and should not be too thin as to create a knot 112 that can slip through the stabilizer loop 107. The exact thickness of the belt can be selected by the designer, depending on the textile material, the size of the openings formed by the stabilizer loop and other relevant considerations.

FIG. 2 shows a front view of the garment 100 in its closed configuration. As shown in FIG. 2, the first front fabric panel 101 overlaps a second front fabric panel 102. The belt 113 can pass through the stabilizer loop 107. Depending on which front fabric panel 101 or 102 is the overlapping one, the belt will pass through the stabilizer loop 107 present on the overlapping front fabric panel 101 or 102. For example, FIG. 2 shows the first stabilizer loop 107 attached to the overlapping first front fabric panel 101. The belt will pass through the stabilizer loop 107. Note that the overlapping configuration of FIG. 2 is typically used for male garments. If the garment is to be worn by a female, the stabilizer loop 107 is typically disposed at the front fabric panel 102. Typically, the overlapping configuration for a female garment is such that the second front fabric panel 102 overlaps the first front fabric panel 101.

A first opposing end portion 110 of the belt 113 can be adapted for being knotted with a second opposing end portion 111 of the belt 113. As shown in FIG. 2, the belt 113 disposed through the first stabilizer loop 107 can substantially align the opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 so that portions of the hemline defined by the lower first and second edges 105, 106 of the opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 are substantially aligned with each other. The knot 112 formed from the opposing first 110 and second 111 end portions of the belt 113 can exceed an aperture size of the first stabilizer loop 107. It is preferred that the knot's size exceed the aperture size of the first stabilizer loop 107 so as to reduce the tendency of the knot 112 from slipping through the first stabilizer loop 107. As shown in FIG. 2, the engagement of the knot 112 with the first stabilizer loop 107 maintains the opposing front fabric panels 101, 102 in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other. While the use of the knot 112 is preferred to maintain substantial alignment of hemlines 105, 106, according to one aspect of the invention, the frictional engagement of said belt 113 through said stabilizer loop 107 can also substantially maintain alignment of hemlines 105, 106 of opposing front fabric panels 101, 102. In addition, the frictional engagement can maintain the opposing front fabric panels 101, 102 in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.

The invention shall now be further described with reference to FIG. 3. FIG. 3 shows a back view of the improved garment 100. The back fabric panel 109 is attached at either side to the first and second front fabric panels 101, 102. The first and second front fabric panels can be attached to the back fabric panel by a seamed or seamless configuration. The belt 113 is shown to wrap around the back fabric panel 109 of the garment 100. The belt 113 is also shown to be disposed on the back fabric panel. In one alternative, the belt 113 may be sewn onto portions of the back fabric panel 109 and/or opposing front fabric panels 101,102. The stabilizer loop 107 can be disposed on either the first or second front fabric panels 101 or 102, although it cannot be viewed in FIG. 3.

According to another embodiment of the invention, a robe 100 can comprise a pair of opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 that can be arranged to cover a person's front in an overlapping configuration when the robe 100 is worn. The robe 100 can include apertures 104 can be positioned for receiving an arm of a person who is wearing the robe 100. According to one aspect, a stabilizer loop 107 can be disposed adjacent to a peripheral edge of a first front fabric panel 101 such that a first front fabric panel 101 can overlap a second front fabric panel 102. Alternatively, the stabilizer loop 107 can be disposed adjacent to a peripheral of a second front fabric panel 102, such that a second front fabric panel 102 can overlap the first front fabric panel 101.

A belt 113 is disposed on the stabilizer loop 107. A combination of the belt 113 with the stabilizer loop 107 can position the opposing first 101 and second 102 front fabric panels so that a bottom peripheral edge defined by the each of the opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 are substantially aligned with each other. A knot 112 can be formed from opposing first 111 and second 110 end portions of the belt. The knot 112 can exceed an aperture size of the stabilizer loop 107; such that an engagement of the knot 112 with either the stabilizer loop 107 can maintain the opposing first and second front fabric panels 101, 102 in a substantially overlapping position with respect to each other.