Title:
Detachable containers
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
It is a typical container enclosed with a plastic body. But instead of it having one opening, it haves two. Both openings are parallel to the walls of the body of the container. One is the opening at the uttermost top of the container; the second is located at the uttermost top of the lower-section of the body of the container. The opening at the top of the container is sealable with a cap; the outside of the mouth and inside of the cap are threaded. The mid-section is already separated without the bodies of the container; it can easily be twisted-off and on from the inside threaded opening at the end of the top-section of the container, which is parallel to the main opening at the uttermost top of the container. There is a threaded indention at the center of the ends of the top-section and lower-section. The lower-section around the mouth is visibly flat to accommodate a stackable feature for the container.



Inventors:
Massop, Tracy Myriam (Brooklyn, NY, US)
Francis Jr., Wendell Anthony (Brooklyn, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/375403
Publication Date:
06/07/2007
Filing Date:
03/15/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D21/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060016819Bottle assembly with removable container assemblyJanuary, 2006Paslawski et al.
20090178995OUTSERT FOR A METAL CONTAINERJuly, 2009Tung et al.
20090236306STOPPERS OF COMPOSITE CORK MATERIAL FOR SPARKLING WINES AND THE PROCESS FOR THEIR PRODUCTIONSeptember, 2009Moura Bordado et al.
20020050482Equilateral triangle bottleMay, 2002Kamdar et al.
20090050598Supportable pressurizable container and base cup thereforFebruary, 2009Huang et al.
20030106872Nipple with air intake valveJune, 2003Lin
20090095700Safety Cap and Container SystemApril, 2009Carroll
20090071925TWO PIECE NESTABLE BOTTLEMarch, 2009Lackey
20030038103Food can and method for producing said canFebruary, 2003Sirotkin et al.
20080272085Bottle StopperNovember, 2008Laporta
20040178161Interconnecting container assemblySeptember, 2004Galustyan



Primary Examiner:
HICKS, ROBERT J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ms. Tracy M. Massop (Brooklyn, NY, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A two-sectioned plastic container, comprising: (a) a body portion, wherein said body portion, includes a mouth portion, either a neck portion or none at all, and shoulder portion above said body portion and a bottom portion at the end of said portion, said body portion is betwixt said shoulder portion and bottom portion, said body portion, includes a detachable feature, said division creates a top and lower section, said top and lower sections holds the same amount of content; (b) sealable openings for said top and lower sections, said mouth portion is the opening for the fluent flow of content for the said top section, wherein said mouth is sealed with an internally threaded cap, said lower section opening have a threaded opening where content can have a fluent flow, the said lower section is sealed with an internally threaded indention at the end of said top section, said lower section has an internally threaded indention at said bottom portion of said body portion, wherein said lower section indention is sealed with a thin plastic film; (c) central and parallel openings, said top section opening is circumferentially at the center of said body portion, said lower section opening and said threaded indention of said top section are circumferentially at the center of the said body portion, said lower section opening and said threaded indention of said top section are parallel vertically and horizontally to said body portion, and said top section, said lower section indention is circumferentially at the center of said body portion, said top and lower section openings are facing the same direction, upwards. (d) flat leveled surfaces, said top and lower sections can stand erect independently of each other, said top section can be stacked on top of said lower section or visa versa, when said top section and said lower section are twisted onto one another's said internally threaded indentions, said lower section have no neck without nor within the said body portion, there is only a flat surface surrounding the said lower section opening.

2. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 1 wherein said body portion is square in shape throughout its length.

3. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 1 wherein said body portion is rectangular in shape throughout its length.

4. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 1 wherein said body portion is oval in shape throughout its length.

5. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 1 wherein said body portion is cylindrical in shape throughout its length.

6. A two-sectioned plastic container, comprising: (a) a body portion, wherein said body portion, includes a mouth portion, either a neck portion or none at all, and shoulder portion above said body portion, said body portion is betwixt said shoulder portion and bottom portion, said body portion, includes a detachable feature, said division creates a top and lower section, said top and lower sections holds the same amount of content; (b) sealable openings for said top and lower sections, said mouth portion is the opening for the fluent flow of content for the said top section, wherein said mouth is sealed with an internally threaded cap, said lower section opening have a threaded opening where content can have a fluent flow, the said lower section is sealed with an internally threaded indention at the end of said top section; (c) central and parallel openings, said top section opening is circumferentially at the center of said body portion, said lower section opening and said threaded indention of said top section are circumferentially at the center of the said body portion, said lower section opening and said threaded indention are parallel vertically and horizontally to said body portion, and said top section, said lower section indention is circumferentially at the center of said body portion, said top and lower section openings are facing the same direction, upwards. (d) flat leveled surfaces, said top and lower sections can stand erect independently of each other, said top section can be stacked on top of said lower section when said top section is twisted onto said lower section, said lower section have no neck without nor within the said body portion, there is only a flat surface surrounding the said lower section opening.

7. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 6 wherein said body portion is square in shape throughout its length;

8. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 6 wherein said body portion is rectangular in shape throughout its length;

9. The two-sectioned plastic container according to claim 6 wherein said body portion is oval in shape throughout its length.

Description:

This is a continuation to claim the benefit of a Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/741,122 filed Dec. 2, 2005.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Reference cited which was prior that are used when explaining this present Invention are:

    • 1. U.S. Pat. No. 2,326,414 issued Aug. 10, 1943, due to its detachable stacking ability.
    • 2. U.S. Pat. No. 4,603,784 issued Aug. 5, 1986, due to its detachable feature in the nursing bottle that can hold two different liquids or the same liquid.
    • 3. U.S. Pat. No. 6,105,129 issued Aug. 22, 2000, due to its inflexibility when dispensing beverages.
    • 4. U.S. Pat. No. 5,002,199 issued Mar. 26, 1991, due to its shape.
    • 5. U.S. Pat. No. 5,092,474 issued Mar. 3, 1992, due to its shape.
    • 6. U.S. Pat. No. 3,342,379 issued Sep. 19, 1967, due to its shape.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This Invention relates to typical thin-walled, blow-mold/injection-mold containers of a biaxial oriented polyethylene terephthalate (PET) resin, etc. that are particularly segmented to create two sections.

Blow-mold/injection-mold containers of biaxial orientation are known typically as diverse containers that contains food, water, carbonated beverages, and etc. The containers I refer to in this application are jars, rectangular-based bottles, and oval-based bottles. They are light-weight, thin-walled, have sturdy structures, and some are easily recyclable. Containers of polyethylene terephthalate resin, etc. are worldly used by people and manufactured. The resins typically used for the containers I refer to in this application are polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and high density polyethylene terephthalate (HDPE). There are always modifications being applied to these containers due to the resins that are used for great molding accuracy. These containers can and are re-used by individuals whom refill the containers with juice, solid foods, detergent liquid, or even water. Because, of their convenience to society today, it is easily marketable to consumers and easily recognizable; especially, when an individual's favorite product is present in a container. Hence, to the design of the jar in U.S. Pat. No. 5,092,474 issued Mar. 3, 1992. It is a simple design of ajar and is recognizable.

PET and HDPE containers are durable and diverse. Many patents alone are available to be searched and viewed that can show the transformations; from U.S. Pat. No. 5,002,199 issued Mar. 26, 1991, in which the Inventor presented a well thought-out new way to improve on a bottle. By designing the bottle to be rectangular with interlocking sides, the Inventor allows for a space saving quality and security when bottles are stacked onto one another. The bottle does have flaws which is stated within the patent explanation itself but, does incorporate the spark of innovation/ingenuity of a bottle's structure and function. And another, U.S. Pat. No. 3,342,379 issued Sep. 19, 1967 in which the invention's purpose is to also innovate a container's structure and function.

The problems with jars, rectangular- and oval-based bottles are that it is not very compatible for any real easy sharing capabilities, not even evenly separations of their internal content. Jars, instead of becoming a large object taking up space on a kitchen counter, with a midsection that allows the jar to be cut in half there can be more room for it to fit in a cabinet or a storage place in a refrigerator. Rectangular- and oval-based bottles that can be separated from the middle of the bottle are convenient for people's hands to avoid the carrying of full-sized half-empty bottles. These separations can allow for two different varieties of content in each container.

Containers which have a two-chambered concept for holding liquids such as, beverages; for example, one known container is U.S. Pat. No. 6,105,812 issued Aug. 22, 2000. It is designed for beverages with a two-chambered compartment that are within a contained structure. It has an opening on either side of the cylinder-shaped container. The problem with it is that the openings on both ends are not suitable for quick sharing capabilities. Both ends cannot be active at the same time unless it results in spillage; it is also not detachable. The U.S. Pat. No. 4,603,784 issued Aug. 5, 1986, also haves the concept of separation liquid; for the dispersing of milk, etc. for infants. It has an opening on either side of the nursing bottle. This also cannot be active at the same time without a chance of spillage or leakage. Even though, the separation is at the center of the bottle that relates to the present Invention, it lacks in comparison because the two openings are on either ends of the bottle. The U.S. Pat. No. 2,326,414 issued Aug. 10, 1943. It presents a further example of a detachable feature. '414 include the use of a threaded detachment and reattachment for the container, in which is related to the threaded feature of the present Invention. The stack-ability that is fitted to complete the whole invention of '414 is related to the present Invention's fitted stack-ability to complete the whole bodies of the containers discussed; or even added bodies. Also, U.S. Pat. No. 5,002,199 issued Mar. 26, 1991 can be used as an example of the stackable feature.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The object of the present Invention is to relate the idea of a typical thin-walled, blow/injection mold containers created from either PET or HDPE resin, which have been cut in half, circumferentially at the center of the containers to create two-sections. Also, having a threaded feature at the openings of the two-sections; both openings are facing the same direction which is, upward. The mid-section is already separated without the body of the containers. With the two sections together, the containers stands upright as a typical jar, etc; stacked one on top of the other, the opening of the lower section goes into the threaded indented end located at the center of the top section. The threaded indented ends of the top sections are parallel to the sides of the containers. There is another indented end located at the center of the lower sections which is facing upwards towards the other threaded features.

These types of containers can hold two types of content at once in one whole container if desired and the same content in both sections. It is easier on the hands when carrying and storing. The end of the lower section can allow for multiple sections to be attached/detached at will. Instead of carrying or storing a full-sized half-empty bottle, people can effortlessly improve their situation by detaching one section that is empty; making comfort-ability more convenient. The threaded features at the openings and ends of the top and lower sections make the effortless detachability possible.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a hallow view of a square-orientated plastic jar;

FIG. 2 is a front view of a rectangular-orientated bottle;

FIG. 3 Exploded view of a rectangular-orientated bottle;

FIG. 4 is a hallow view of an oval-orientated bottle;

FIG. 5 is a hallow view of a cylindrical bottle;

FIG. 6 is a hallow view of an altered square-orientated jar;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of an altered rectangular-orientated bottle;

FIG. 8 is a hallow view of an altered oval-orientated bottle.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows a hallow thin-walled, blow/injection molded square-orientated jar made out of a PET or HDPE resin. It show the top-section 1 and lower-section 2 applied together. The flat ended surface 4 at 2 supports the entire bottle. There is an indention at the end of 1 which is, 6; the mouth of 2 is applied together with 6. There is an indention 7 at the end of 2. The mid-section 3 is without the body of the jar, therefore, allowing the jar to be easily separated by twisting the 2 from 1 or visa versa. The opening of 1, 5, of the jar is sealable with a cap; 2 is sealable with the bottom of 1, to create a whole feature of ajar; because, 2 doesn't have a neck. 2 can also be sealed with an internally threaded cap just as 5 can. 4 is sealed with a thin plastic film to prevent from contaminants when, if desired, an additional section is applied. 1 holds the same volume of content as 2. 2 is parallel to 1, vertically and horizontally.

FIG. 2 shows the illustration of a rectangular-orientated bottle made from a plastic resin with grooves. The bottle looks whole and complete but, the lower-section 9 and top-section 8 are applied together. The flat ended surface 12 at 9 supports the entire bottle. Even though, 12 is not fully visible, it has a threaded indention in it, the same as 4 in FIG. 1. The end of 8 and the top of 9 when together show a visible symmetrical line circumferentially around the mid-section 10 of the bottle. The opening of 8, 11, of the bottle is sealable with a cap; 9 is sealable with the bottom of 8, to create a whole feature of a bottle. 12, the same as 4 in FIG. 1, is sealed with a thin plastic film to prevent from contaminants when an additional section is applied. 8 and 9 holds the same volume of content and are parallel to each other vertically and horizontally.

FIG. 3 shows the same indication of the illustrated concept of the FIG. 2, instead, in an assembling feature. The opening 16 of 14 is visible. Both openings 15 and 16 are parallel to the walls of the body of the bottle. Without the walls of 15 and 16 are threaded. 15 is sealed with a cap. The mid-section 19 is shown detached exposing 16 which can be reattached to the inside threaded opening 17, which is indented at 18, the bottom of 13. 19 can provide the option to prevent having to carry a full-sized half-empty bottle or less. 17 is also parallel to 15, 16, and the internal threaded end 20 of 14. When desired, due to the leveled surface of 18, 13 can also stand upright. Around the opening of 16, there is no neck surrounding 16; this feature allows stacking of 13 and 14 when both are applied together. 16 have the same circumferential measurement as 15 and the indented threaded feature of 20; 20 visibly show the internal threading of 14. 16, when necessary can alternatively have an internal threaded cap to seal it when 13 is disposed of.

FIG. 4 shows a hallow oval-orientated bottle made from a plastic resin. The top-section 21 is stacked on top of the lower-section 22. 23, the mid-section is visibly seen circumferentially around the bottle. At 23 there is a flat surface 26, which indicates 22 doesn't have a neck and at the bottom of 21 is flat there fore, making it possible for a the bottle to have a stackable feature. 25, the threaded indention of 21 is visible, which demonstrates how the threaded opening of 22 goes into the threaded indention of 21. The opening of 21 is 25 which is sealable with a internally threaded cap. The opening of 22 is sealed with the threaded indention of 21. 22 also have a threaded indention 27 to permit an additional section to be attached. The end of 22 is sealable with a thin plastic film to prevent contamination.

FIG. 5 shows a hallow cylindrical bottle made from a plastic resin which is the same as FIG. 1 and FIG. 4, besides, the shape of the bottle. It is an erect view with 28 attached to 29 with a visible midsection line 30 and the internally threaded indentions of 28 and 29.

FIG. 6 same as FIG. 1, but without the internally threaded indention at the lower-section of the jar. 31 is the top-section with the internally threaded indention connected to the threaded mouth of lower-section 32.

FIG. 7 is a hallow view of FIG. 3 without the internally threaded indention at the lower-section of the bottle and it is not in an exploded view. 33 is the top-section with the internally threaded indention twisted completely onto the threaded mouth of the lower-section 34.

FIG. 8 same as FIG. 4, but without the internally threaded indention at the lower-section of the bottle. The mouth of 36 is twisted on fully to the internally threaded indention at the end of 35.

While the present Invention is shown in detail, it is evident that modifications and improvements are to be applied when viewed by those skilled in the art, without distorting the true nature of the present Invention.