Title:
Wallboard bracket and method for repair
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A structurally rigid inside corner bracket constructed of plastic or other durable material used to quickly and effectively accept a predetermined sized insert “patch” of drywall or other board-type material in order to repair a damaged section of same material. The bracket shall be placed in the inside corners [either quantity of 2 or 4] of a square or rectangular hole cut to a suitable size in a damaged area of drywall for the purpose of repairing the area by inserting a second cut square or rectangular “patch” to fit into the first hole. The bracket is inserted along the inside corner edge and face of the predetermined cut hole and are situated such that they are placed opposite of each other and held in place by the flange portion of the device exerting pressure on the front and rear face of the wallboard to be repaired. The device derives its structural rigidity through a front and rear flange area coupled perpendicular to an integral spine. The flange portions are such that they hold the bracket in place and are capable of accepting the predetermined “patch” both in a vertical and overhead application by means of an adhesive located on the inside backing flange portion of the bracket. The “patch” is inserted into the predetermined hole of the drywall to be patched and pressed firmly onto the flanged brackets. The “patch” attaches to the adhesive and is ready for repair. The purpose of the bracket is to retain the “patch” from falling thru a hollow wall section and secure it for final application of joint compound and or other industry accepted practices for drywall repair.



Inventors:
Herbold, Michael A. (Victoria, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/018334
Publication Date:
06/07/2007
Filing Date:
12/20/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/38
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CAJILIG, CHRISTINE T
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Michael A. Herbold (Victoria, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A wallboard bracket used to secure a wallboard patch in order to repair an existing wallboard.

2. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket is constructed to receive a “patch” insert of similar material wherein the perimeter corner portion of the “patch” insert is supported on the backside, thus preventing patch from falling thru the existing wallboard to be patched.

3. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket can be concealed by conventional wallboard repair practices such as taping, plastering, application of joint compound or application of spackling.

4. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket can be constructed of plastic, metal or other durable material.

5. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4, wherein said bracket is formed from an extruded plastic.

6. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4, wherein said bracket is formed from an extruded metal.

7. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4, wherein said bracket is formed from an extruded composite material.

8. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4, wherein said bracket is formed from a durable material in a continuous piece.

9. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket thickness is ⅛″ or less.

10. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket is constructed to install in the inside corners of a predetermined hole for the purpose of accepting a “patch” of similar material.

11. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket is placed opposite of each other and can be either 2 or 4 in number.

12. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, where said bracket is held in place by the flange portion of the device exerting pressure on the front and rear face of the wallboard to be repaired.

13. A wallboard bracket according to claim 12, wherein said bracket derives its structural rigidness through a front and rear flange area coupled perpendicular to an integral spine.

14. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket can be installed in either vertical or overhead application.

15. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket can accept either ½″ or ⅝″ thick board type material.

16. A wallboard bracket according to claim 10, wherein said bracket or clip accepts a “patch” of similar material planar to the material to be repaired.

17. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket needs no screws, nails or adhesive to install.

18. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket does not penetrate existing wallboard to be repaired or similar “patch”.

19. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket contains no barbs, tangs or spring flanges to be removed.

20. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket contains an adhesive.

21. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket holds “patch” insert in a common plane to the wallboard to be repaired.

22. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket contains gripping flanges located on 90 degree angles.

23. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket contains an adhesive for securing “patch” insert.

24. A method of using a wallboard bracket to secure a “patch” of similar material in order to repair a damaged section of wallboard.

25. A method according to claim 24 wherein said damaged section of wallboard is repaired using a bracket located to receive a “patch” of similar material and said bracket has a front and rear flange area that sandwiches front and rear face of the wallboard to be repaired.

26. A method according to claim 24 wherein repairs to consist of 1. Cut out of suitable area of wallboard surrounding damaged section in a square or rectangular shape. 2. Cut new section of “patch” of wallboard to fit into hole cut into damaged section. 3. Installation of either quantity of 2 or 4 brackets into internal corners of square or rectangular hole cut in wallboard to be repaired. 4. Inserting of “patch” of similar material until it contacts the backing flange portion of the bracket which contains an adhesive to hold the “patch” firmly. 5. Application of joint compound, spackling, plastering or taping or any other Industry accepted material for drywall repair.

27. A method according to claim 24, wherein repairs can be made in either the horizontal or vertical position.

28. A method according to claim 24 wherein the “patch” section is slightly smaller than the corresponding hole cut in the wallboard to be repaired.

29. A method according to claim 24 wherein said method comprises, wallboard, drywall, sheathing, or any other board-type material.

30. A method of constructing an inspection cover in a board-type material.

31. A method according to claim 30, wherein the method consists of: 1. Cut out of a suitable area either a square or a rectangle of wallboard for the purpose of an inspection cover. 2. Cut new section or “patch” insert of wallboard to fit into hole of inspection cover. 3. Installation of either quantity of 2 or 4 brackets into internal corners of square or rectangular hole for cover. 4. Inserting of “patch” or cover of similar material until it contacts the backing flange portion of the bracket which contains an adhesive to hold the cover in place.

32. A method according to claim 30 wherein said method comprises wallboard, drywall, sheathing or any other board-type material.

33. A method according to claim 24 wherein said method calls for a bracket to be used to accept a “patch” of similar material wherein said “patch” can be located in a hollow wall regardless of backing or supporting members.

34. A method according to claim 30 wherein said method calls for a bracket to be used to accept a “cover” of similar material wherein said cover can be located in a hollow wall regardless of backing members.

35. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket does not penetrate either the wallboard to be repaired, the patch or cover.

36. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket encases the inside corners of a square or rectangular predetermined hole in wallboard or other board-type material to become a corner support in order to accept a “patch” of similar material.

37. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket encases the inside corners of a square or rectangular predetermined hole in wallboard or other board type material to become a corner support in order to accept a “cover of similar material.

38. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket is used in plurality (quantity 2 or 4) and located in opposing inside corners of a predetermined hole cut in wallboard or other board-type material.

39. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1, wherein said bracket is constructed to fit snuggly against the inside corner of a predetermined hole cut in wallboard or other board-type material.

40. A method according to claim 1 wherein said bracket can be installed without bending, cutting, shearing or penetration of any type into either the existing wallboard to be repaired on the “patch” insert.

41. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4 wherein said bracket can be formed by means of a die from a single piece of metal.

42. A wallboard bracket according to claim 4 wherein said bracket components are made entirely of the same material.

43. A wallboard bracket according to claim 3, wherein said bracket has a low profile which can be concealed by conventional wallboard repair practices.

44. A wallboard bracket according to claim 20 wherein said bracket contains an adhesive capable of holding the “patch” in either the vertical or horizontal direction.

45. A wallboard bracket according to claim 19, wherein said bracket requires no locking member, tang, bendable gripping members or adjustment of any part in order to accept “patch” of similar material.

46. A wallboard bracket according to claim 10, wherein said bracket can be rotated 360 degrees Planer to “patch” for installation purposes.

47. A wallboard bracket according to claim 12 wherein said bracket flanges are spaced, slightly less apart then the thickness of the wallboard “patch” to be installed.

48. A wallboard bracket according to claim 13, wherein said bracket's flanges form an angle of 90 degrees.

49. A wallboard bracket according to claim 13, wherein said brackets' backing flange is located perpendicular to its spine.

50. A wallboard bracket according to claim 1 wherein said bracket can be reused again after removal from a patched wallboard.

51. A wallboard bracket according to claim 2, wherein said bracket once, installed into the predetermined hole and the “patch” section inserted, becomes rigid and can be repaired using conventional wallboard repairing methods.

52. A wallboard bracket according to claim 10, wherein said bracket which because of its inside corner mounting provides more support for the repair “patch” as opposed to supporting it from its sides.

53. A wallboard bracket according to claim 2, wherein said bracket does not need to touch or come in contact with the edges of the “patch” insert for the purpose of repair.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a bracket for repair of a hole in a board-type material. The invention also relates to a method for repair of a hole in a board-type material and a method for constructing an inspection cover in a board-type material allowing for access.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Current building techniques are geared at using skeletal wall framing members covered with a board-type material such as drywall, gypsum board, sheetrock, plasterboard, sheathing, etc. These board-type materials are attached to the skeletal wall framing members to create a partition.

The resultant condition creates a wall, void of any supporting member other than the skeleton to which it is attached.

When a hole or damaged condition exists in the board-type material between skeletal members, it becomes necessary to support a “patch” in order to repair it. Since there are no supports between framing members a bracket can be utilized to support the “patch” of like material in order to repair it This bracket prevents the “patch” from falling thru the void of the wall and retains it for repair using conventional methods such as taping and floating, caulking etc. The bracket aligns the surface of the “patch” with the surface of the board-type material, making the repair uniform at the surface.

When repairs are made by other methods such as cutting back to the skeletal members a more accurate cut must be made in order for a good fit of the “patch” material. Usually this requires a larger section to be used for the repair thus making it difficult to keep the repaired area flat and uniform.

Without the use of the bracket, backing must be installed in some form for supporting purposes in order to prevent the “patch” from falling thru the void. Installing the backing involves more time and more difficulty because of the confined area in which to work. The task also involves additional tools in order to complete and a higher skilled level person.

Repairing by working along the exterior inside corners of a predetermined hole cut in a board-type material is a better solution. Using a 90 degree corner-type bracket to support a “patch” of like material produces a repair that is strong and uniform. The edges of the predetermined hole cut in the board-type material or the “patch” that is inserted into it, does not need to be perfectly straight as the bracket relies only on the corner portions of the “patch” in order to provide support Once the corner brackets are installed into the predetermined hole, the “patch” is inserted and adheres to the adhesive located on the backing flange of the bracket. The “patch” is ready for conventional repair methods such as taping, floating, caulking, etc.

Reviewing different approaches to solving the problem exposes several disadvantages to the various existing solutions. When using a device that is mounted along the edges of the “patch” insert such as one that requires a folding support to lock it onto the predetermined hole more care must be taken in cutting the edges of the hole to be repaired and also the edges of the “patch” insert itself. The edges of the hole must be cut straight and perpendicular to the face because such devices rely on a closer fit in order for them to be able to lock onto the back surface of the hole to be repaired.

Placement of a “patch” insert into the bracket is simplified because the bracket adheres to the “patch” corners and not its sides, eliminating any problem with alignment or exact positioning of the brackets themselves. Insertion of the “patch” is made simpler because the brackets are inserted into the corners of the predetermined hole to be patched and not onto the edges of the “patch” insert. Also since the brackets mount into the corners of the predetermined hole either a quantity of 2 or 4 are used and not any more as may be required by devices which mount along the edges of the “patch” insert. Reviewing different approaches to solving the problem, exposes several disadvantages to the various existing solutions.

Design Pat. Nos. 4,995,605 and 4,782,642 (Conville) is more suited to joining complete sheets of wallboard, rather than patching it. The clip does not capture the edges of the “patch” and requires screws and removable tangs to support it for application of tape and joint compound.

Design Pat. Nos. 6,209,277 and 6,088,986 and D427,509 (DiGate) relies on barbs and a foldable tang to support the “patch” section. The repair clip must be used along the straight edge of the “patch” and not the corner where there is a stronger advantage.

Design Pat. No. 4,448,008 (Adams) is a penetrating type clip made to dig into the edge of a wallboard and then be screwed to a structural member as in Design Pat. No. 4,333,286 (Weinar). U.S. Pat. No. 4,178,730 (Rowinski) 1979 relies on a barbed tang to penetrate the outer paper skin of a wallboard along its edge and does not grip the “patch” section for repair.

Other References—U.S. Pat. No. 4,641,474(Cannarsa), U.S. Pat. No. 4,644,723 (Weber), U.S. Pat. No. 4,831,808 (Wynar), U.S. Pat. No. 5,693,079 (Loeffler), U.S. Pat. No. 5,687,528 (Rouch), U.S. Pat. No. 4,498212, (Adams), D391,149 (Gonzales), and U.S. Pat. No. 5,619,836 (Rouch). Refer to lesser devices and only parallel remotely the subject devices.

Subject: Wallboard Bracket and Method for Repair

SUMMARY

The invention is primarily an apparatus and method for repair of drywall, wallboard or other board-type materials independent of wall or ceiling framing members in a hollow wall application.

Conventional building practices consists of wallboard or other board-type materials to be attached by means of nailing, screwing, gluing or other attaching methods to vertical or overhead framing members to construct a wall or ceiling section.

Anyone skilled in the art of conventional construction understands that framing members are usually placed at intervals of 16 inches or 24 inches and once wallboard or other board type materials are fastened to these framing members a hollow wall conditioned is created.

When a hole or penetration is created unwantedly, it is difficult to apply a patch without the use of a backer or reinforcement thru the hollow wall section.

A structurally rigid inside corner bracket constructed of plastic or other durable material can be used to quickly and effectively accept a predetermined sized insert “patch” of drywall or other board-type material in order to repair a damaged section of same material.

The bracket shall be placed in the inside corners [either quantity of 2 or 4] of a square or rectangular hole cut to a suitable size in a damaged area of drywall for the purpose of repairing the area by inserting a second cut square or rectangular “patch” to fit into the first hole.

The bracket is inserted along the inside corner edge and face of the predetermined cut hole and are situated such that they are placed opposite of each other and held in place by the flange portion of the device exerting pressure on the front and rear face of the wallboard to be repaired.

The device derives its structural rigidity through a front and rear flange area coupled perpendicular to an integral spine. The flange portions are such that they hold the bracket in place and are capable of accepting the predetermined “patch” both in a vertical and overhead application by means of an adhesive located on the inside backing flange portion of the bracket The “patch” is inserted into the predetermined hole of the drywall to be patched and pressed firmly onto the flanged brackets. The “patch” attaches to the adhesive and is ready for repair. The purpose of the bracket is to retain the “patch” from falling thru a hollow wall or ceiling section and secure it for final application of joint compound and or other industry accepted practices for drywall repair.

The invention can also be used to create a removable inspection cover for access in a particular area of drywall or other board-type material. Using the brackets in the same manner as a repair condition, the “Patch” becomes an inspection cover providing for inspection or service accessibility. Conventional practices for drywall repair may be used to mask the brackets from view.

In summation a wallboard bracket can be used to secure a wallboard patch in order to repair the existing wallboard or other board-type materials. It is also a method of using a wallboard bracket to secure a “Patch” of similar material in order to repair a damaged section of wallboard. It can additionally be used as a method of constructing an inspection cover in a board-type material.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The following drawings are representative of the subject bracket. Manufacturing techniques may dictate final configuration of the bracket, however form and function remain unchanged.

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the bracket referencing the various names of its component parts.

FIG. 2 is a front, top and side view of the bracket denoting its various components

FIG. 3 is a typical installation showing where the bracket is mounted in the pre-determined hole.

FIG. 4 shows a typical repair using a quantity of four brackets and a “patch” insert.

FIG. 5 depicts a cross-section view of the bracket and “patch” insert installed.

FIG. 6 depicts a typical inspection cover installation using the bracket

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawing, a wallboard bracket is shown depicting the various key components of its design.

Item 1 is the flange which contacts the inner and outer surfaces of a board-type material[Item 6]. Item 2 is the backing flange and its function is to support the “patch” insert or inspection cover at its rear surface. Item 3 is the spine. Flanges are perpendicular from its face, creating its strength holding the flanges the proper distance apart for the thickness of the board-type material [Item 6] to be repaired. Item 4 is the pull-off adhesive which once it comes into contact with the back surface of the “patch” insert [Item 5] or inspection cover [Item 8], holds it in place and readies it for application of tape, joint compound, caulk or other practices. The specific repair practices are not mentioned in this discussion as they vary depending on individual cases and requirements.

Looking at FIG. 2 the various components of the bracket are shown in the top, front and side views as projected.

In FIG. 3 the bracket is shown inserted into the corner of the pre-determined hole [Item 7] and ready to accept the “patch” insert [Item 5]. Using the corner bracket as depicted allows for the edges of both the pre-determined hole [Item 7] and the “patch” insert [Item 5] do not have to be straight and perpendicular to their respective face in order for the bracket to be effective.

FIG. 4 shows a typical wall section with a board-type material [Item 6] fastened to skeletal support members. The pre-determined hole [Item 7] is fitted with a quantity of four corner brackets ready to accept a “patch” insert [Item 5]. This application allows the “patch” insert to be inserted into the brackets mounted into the pre-determined hole[Item 7], between skeletal members, using no other supports or backing.

FIG. 5 shows a section view of the brackets and the “patch” insert[Item 5] inserted into the [pre-determined hole[Item 7] of the board-type material [item 6].

FIG. 6 depicts an inspection cover [Item 8] ready to be inserted into the pre-determined hole [Item 7] of the board-type material[Item 6] using the bracket to support it

Operation

Once a damaged area between skeletal members is located in a board-type material, a square or rectangular hole is cut to encompass the damaged area for the purpose of repairing it. The perimeter of the hole to be cut is traced from a piece of similar material cut for the purpose of using it for a “patch” insert.

Installation of the bracket consist of grasping it with your hand and positioning it into a corner of a pre-determined square or rectangular hole cut into a board-type material. The flange components of the bracket are slid over the front and rear surfaces of the inside corners of the pre-determined hole until they bottom-out against the back surface spine. Once the bracket is in place, it cannot move in the “X” and “Y” direction towards the inside corner of the pre-determined hole. The “patch” insert is pressed firmly against the adhesive located on the backing flange of the bracket. The area is now ready for application of tape, joint compound, calk or any other practices for wallboard repair.