Title:
Composite dumpster
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A dumpster comprises a fiber-reinforced composite material. Exemplarily, the dumpster comprises a metallic frame and a plurality of fiber-reinforced polymer panels secured to the metallic frame to define an interior waste storage volume for storing waste in the dumpster.



Inventors:
Seiter, Joe (Raleigh, NC, US)
Application Number:
11/288592
Publication Date:
05/31/2007
Filing Date:
11/29/2005
Assignee:
Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D88/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GROSSO, HARRY A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Barnes & Thornburg LLP (IN) (Indianapolis, IN, US)
Claims:
1. A dumpster comprising opposed first and second side walls, first and second end walls interconnecting the first and second side walls at opposite longitudinal ends of the dumpster, and a floor to which the first and second side walls and the first and second end walls are secured, the first and second side walls, the first and second end walls, and the floor cooperating to define an interior waste storage volume, the first end wall comprising a door openable to discharge waste from the interior waste storage volume, wherein at least one of the first side wall, the second side wall, the first end wall, the second end wall, or the floor comprises a fiber-reinforced composite component.

2. The dumpster of claim 1, wherein each of the first side wall, the second side wall, the first end wall, the second wall, and the floor comprises a fiber-reinforced polymer panel.

3. The dumpster of claim 2, comprising a metallic frame to which each panel is secured.

4. The dumpster of claim 2, wherein each of the first and second side walls comprises a plurality of fiber-reinforced polymer panels.

5. The dumpster of claim 1, wherein component is a fiber-reinforced composite panel comprising first and second skins and a core sandwiched therebetween.

6. The dumpster of claim 5, wherein the panel comprises a plurality of fiber insertions extending from the first skin through the core to the second skin.

7. The dumpster of claim 1, comprising a gasket, wherein the door comprises a fiber-reinforced composite panel that cooperates with the gasket to establish a seal therebetween when the door is closed.

8. The dumpster of claim 1, comprising a metallic frame member to which the fiber-reinforced composite component is secured.

9. A dumpster comprising a metallic frame and a plurality of fiber-reinforced polymer panels secured to the metallic frame to define an interior waste storage volume for storing waste in the dumpster.

10. The dumpster of claim 9, comprising a fiber-reinforced polymer longitudinal member connecting two adjacent fiber-reinforced polymer panels.

11. The dumpster of claim 9, wherein the metallic frame defines an opening at the top of the dumpster for introducing waste through the opening into the interior waste storage volume.

12. The dumpster of claim 9, wherein at least one of the panels is included in a door of the dumpster.

13. The dumpster of claim 9, wherein at least one of the panels is included in a wall of the dumpster.

14. The dumpster of claim 9, wherein at least one of the panels is included in a floor of the dumpster.

15. A dumpster comprising a fiber-reinforced composite material, wherein the dumpster complies with ISO 1496-1:1990(E).

16. The dumpster of claim 15, comprising a wall, a floor, a door, and an interior waste storage volume defined at least partially by the wall, the floor, and the door, wherein at least one of the wall, the floor, and the door comprises a fiber-reinforced polymer panel.

17. The dumpster of claim 15, comprising a fiber-reinforced polymer panel.

18. The dumpster of claim 17, wherein the fiber-reinforced polymer panel comprises first and second skins, a core sandwiched between the first and second skins, and a plurality of fiber insertions extending from the first skin through the core to the second skin.

19. The dumpster of claim 15, wherein the dumpster weighs less than 10,000 pounds.

20. The dumpster of claim 15, wherein the dumpster weighs about 6,300 pounds and is about 20 feet long, about 8 feet wide, and about 12 feet high.

Description:

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The present disclosure relates generally to dumpsters.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

Dumpsters are used to store waste material. For example, there are municipal waste dumpsters used to store municipal waste and which can be loaded onto and off of a vehicle for transporting the dumpster between a waste collection site and a landfill or other location.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

According to an aspect of the present disclosure, there is provided a dumpster that comprises a relatively high strength-to-weight fiber-reinforced composite material. Exemplarily, the dumpster comprises a metallic frame and a plurality of fiber-reinforced polymer panels secured to the metallic frame to define an interior waste storage volume for storing waste in the dumpster.

Illustratively, according to another aspect of the disclosure, the dumpster comprises opposed first and second side walls, first and second end walls interconnecting the first and second side walls at opposite longitudinal ends of the dumpster, and a floor to which the first and second side walls and the first and second end walls are secured. The first and second side walls, the first and second end walls, and the floor cooperate to define the interior waste storage volume. Further, the first end wall comprises a door pivotably mounted at the top thereof for discharge of waste from the interior waste storage volume. Exemplarily, each of the first side wall, the second side wall, the first end wall, the second end wall, and the floor comprises at least one of the fiber-reinforced polymer panels.

The above and other features of the present disclosure will become apparent from the following description and the attached drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a composite dumpster;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective of the dumpster;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view showing tilting of the dumpster to empty waste therefrom upon opening of a door;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary end elevational view of a first end of the dumpster showing a U-shaped gasket which is viewable in the absence of a door of the first end;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along lines 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along lines 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is an end elevational view of a second end of the dumpster opposite to the first end; and

FIG. 8 is a bottom view of the dumpster.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

While the concepts of the present disclosure are susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific exemplary embodiments thereof have been shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intent to limit the disclosure to the particular forms disclosed, but on the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives following within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, there is shown a composite dumpster 10. The dumpster is made of a fiber-reinforced composite material so that the dumpster 10 has a relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. As such, the dumpster 10 is useful for storing all sorts of waste materials including, but not limited to, municipal solid waste in an interior waste storage volume 12 defined in the dumpster 10. For example, the dumpster 10 may be placed at or near a work site or other waste collection site for temporary storage of waste material as needed. When the dumpster 10 is full or it is otherwise time to remove the dumpster 10, the dumpster 10 can be loaded onto a vehicle and transported to a landfill or other location where the dumpster 10 can be emptied of its contents (FIG. 3). The dumpster 10 can then be transported to the same or another site and unloaded from the vehicle for re-use. Use of the fiber-reinforced composite material in the dumpster 10 not only promotes a relatively high strength-to-weight ratio for the dumpster 10, it also promotes the longevity of the useful life of the dumpster 10.

The fiber-reinforced composite material may be embodied in a variety of ways. For example, the material may be embodied as a fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) having a reinforcing agent in a polymer resin matrix. The FRP material may be embodied as any FRP structure including, but not limited to, a solid laminate or a sandwich panel (e.g., a panel having first and second skins with a core sandwiched therebetween and possibly fiber insertions extending from the first skin through the core to the second skin). As such, the FRP structures may be embodied, for example, as either 2-D or 3-D structures (e.g., a 2-D or 3-D laminate or panel). An exemplary sandwich panel for use in the dumpster 10 is TRANSONITE® available from Martin Marietta Materials, Inc. of Raleigh, N.C.

The matrix may include a thermosetting resin, although thermoplastic resins are also contemplated for use. Examples of thermosetting resins which may be used include, but are not limited to, unsaturated polyesters, vinyl esters, polyurethanes, epoxies, phenolics, and mixtures and blends thereof.

The reinforcing agent may include E-glass fibers, although other reinforcements such as S-glass, carbon, KEVLAR®, aramids, metal, UHMW (ultra high molecular weight) materials, high modulus organic fibers (e.g. aromatic polyamides, polybenzamidazoles, and aromatic polyimides), and other organic fibers (e.g. polyethylene and nylon) may be used. Blends and hybrids of the various reinforcing materials may be used. Other suitable composite materials may be utilized including whiskers and fibers such as boron, aluminum silicate, and basalt.

In the case of where the FRP structure is embodied as a sandwich panel, the core type may include, but is not limited to, balsa wood, foam, open-cell material, closed-cell material, and various types of honeycomb.

The FRP structures may be embodied as any of the structures disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,794,402; 6,023,806; 6,044,607; 6,070,378; 6,081,955; 6,108,998; 6,467,118 B2; 6,645,333; 6,676,785, the entirety of each of which is hereby incorporated by reference. It should be appreciated that the structures disclosed in the above-identified patents may be sized, scaled, dimensioned, orientated, or otherwise configured in any desired manner to fit the needs of a given design of the FRP structure.

Illustratively, the dumpster 10 is configured as an open top hollow rectangular box, although other geometric or irregular shapes are also contemplated (e.g., cubic or other polygonal shapes). In the illustrative rectangular box example, the dumpster 10 has opposed side walls 14, a first end wall 16 interconnecting the side walls 14 at a first longitudinal end of the dumpster 10, a second end wall 18 interconnecting the side walls 14 at an opposite second longitudinal end of the dumpster 10, and a floor 20 to which the walls 14, 16, 18 are secured. The walls 14, 16, 18 and the floor 20 cooperate to define the interior waste storage volume 12. In addition, the walls 14, 16, 18 cooperate to provide the dumpster 10 with a top opening 22 for reception of waste material into the volume 12. The top opening 12 may be covered or uncovered.

Exemplarily, the dumpster 10 is about 20 feet long, about 8 feet wide, and about 12 feet high and weighs less than 10,000 pounds (4,536 kg). For example, the dumpster 10 weighs about 6300 pounds (2,858 kg). This is less than the weight of all-metal dumpsters weighing 10,500 pounds (4,763 kg) or, in some cases, 10,150 pounds (4,604 kg).

Further exemplarily, the dumpster 10 is constructed to satisfy ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 1496-1:1990(E) which is hereby incorporated by reference herein. Under a load of about 52,911 pounds (24,000 kg) (the load including the weight of both the dumpster 10 and cargo therein), a wall 14 of the dumpster 10 deflected only about 2 15/16inches (7.46 cm), within the ISO envelope. The wall 14 returned to its original state upon removal of the cargo. Each wall 14 is thus resiliently deflectable.

To provide the dumpster 10 with the thus-described shape or other shape, the dumpster 10 comprises a frame 24 and a number of FRP panels 26 secured thereto and sized according to their particular use and location within the dumpster 10. The structural members of the frame 24 may all be metallic, may all be made of a fiber-reinforced composite material, or may be a mix of metallic and fiber-reinforced composite members. In the case where the frame 24 has at least one metallic structural member, the frame 24 may be referred to as a metallic frame, as in the illustrative example of the dumpster 24 which has a number of metallic structural members made of carbon steel or other metal.

In the illustrated embodiment, each side wall 14 is provided by a number of frame members and a number of panels 28. In particular, exemplarily, each side wall 14 is provided by an upper horizontal longitudinal tubular beam 30, a lower horizontal longitudinal channel 32, a pair of vertical corner posts 34, and joints 36 in the form of castings interconnecting the posts 34, the beam 30, and the channel 32.

There are, for example, three panels 28a, 28b, 28c which form the main body of the wall 14. The panels 28a, 28b, 28c are secured to the beam 30, the channel 32, and the posts 34 by use of additional frame members. For example, on the outside of the panels 28a, 28b, 28c, there are a horizontal upper channel 38, a pair of corner angle bars 40, and a pair of vertical tubular bars 42, and, on the inside of the panels 28a, 28b, 28c, there are a number (e.g., three) of horizontal upper angle bars 44, a horizontal lower angle bar 46, and a pair of vertical T-shaped bars 48. Each of the panels 28a, 28b, 28c of the wall 14 is secured to the upper channel 38, the lower channel 32, one of the upper angle bars 44, and the lower angle bar 46. The intermediate panel 28b is also secured to both tubular bars 42 and both T-shaped bars 48, each of which extends between the intermediate panel 28b and an adjacent end panel 28a, 28c. Each end panel 28a, 28c of the wall 14 is also secured to one of the tubular bars 42, one of the T-shaped bars 48, and one of the corner angle bars 40. The panels 28a, 28b, 28c may be secured to their respective frame members by use of, for example, an adhesive or other bonding agent and/or one or more fasteners.

An access hole 50 may be formed in any of the panels 28a, 28b, 28c of the wall 14, illustratively, the intermediate panel 28b. The hole 50 may be closed with a plug 52 when not in use.

The first end wall 16 is provided, for example, by a number of the frame members and a door 54. The frame members include a pair of posts 34 and horizontal upper and lower transverse tubular bars 56, 58 interconnecting the posts 34 via joints 36. Gussets 59 may be secured to beams 30 and the bar 56.

The door 54 is mounted at its top to the upper transverse bar 56 by hinges 60 for pivotable movement between a closed position shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and an opened position FIG. 3. The door 54 may be locked in the closed position by a lock mechanism including a first latch 62 mounted to the door 60 and a second latch 64 mounted to each panel 28a. The door 54 includes a panel 28d secured to vertical tubular bars 66 and horizontal tubular bars 68.

Referring to FIGS. 4-6, a deformable gasket 70 is provided to establish a sealed connection between it and the panel 28d upon closure of the door 54 to prevent leakage from volume 12. Illustratively, the gasket 70 is generally U-shaped such that it has a pair of vertical portions 72 and a connecting horizontal portion 74. Each vertical portion 72 is secured to a vertical plate 76 secured to a respective panel 28a. The horizontal portion 74 is secured to the horizontal plate 78 secured to a panel 28e of the floor 20. The gasket 70 is compressed (e.g., about 25%) when the door 54 is closed and returns to its relaxed state to assume a generally D-shaped configuration when the door 54 is opened. Exemplarily, the gasket 70 is made of medium density neoprene although other materials suitable for effecting the seal may be used.

Referring to FIG. 7, the second end wall 18 is provided, for example, by a number of frame members and a panel 28f. Horizontal upper and lower transverse tubular bars 80, 82 are secured to corner posts 34 via joints 36. The panel 28f is secured to these frame members by the use of additional frame members. On the outside, the panel 28f is secured to a horizontal upper channel 84 secured to the bar 80, a horizontal lower angle bar 86 secured to the bar 82, and a pair of vertical angle bars 88 secured to the posts 34. As shown in FIG. 2, on the inside, the panel 28f is secured to a horizontal upper angle bar 90 secured to the bar 80, a horizontal lower angle bar 92 secured to the bar 82, and a pair of vertical corner angle bars 94 secured to the panel 28f and the respective panel 28c. Additional gussets 59 may be secured to beams 30 and bar 80.

Referring to FIG. 8, the floor 20 is provided, for example, by a number of frame members and the panel 28e. Exemplarily, the panel 28e is one relatively large panel extending most of the length of the dumpster 10 although the panel 28e may be formed of a plurality of smaller panels. The panel 28e (or panels) are secured to the two longitudinal channels 32 and a plurality of transverse channels 94 secured to the channels 32.

As for the materials of the frame members, as alluded to above, the frame members may be made of metal and/or a fiber-reinforced composite material. Exemplarily, all of the frame members are made of metal (e.g., steel) except frame members 46, 48, 92, and 94.

An exemplarily construction of each panel 28 is shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 with reference to panels 28a, 28d, 28e. The panel 28 is configured, for example, as a sandwich panel comprising first and second skins 96, 98, a core 100 sandwiched between the skins 96, 98, and a plurality of fiber insertions 102 extending from the first skin 96 through the core 100 to the second skin 98. The skins 96, 98 are made, for example, of a glass-fiber-reinforced polyester resin polymer and the core 100 is made, for example, of urethane foam, although any of the reinforcing agents and matrix materials mentioned above can be used in the panel 28.

While the concepts of the present disclosure have been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, such illustration and description is to be considered as exemplary and not restrictive in character, it being understood that only illustrative embodiments have been shown and described and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the disclosure are desired to be protected.

There are a plurality of advantages of the concepts of the present disclosure arising from the various features of the systems described herein. It will be noted that alternative embodiments of each of the systems of the present disclosure may not include all of the features described yet still benefit from at least some of the advantages of such features. Those of ordinary skill in the art may readily devise their own implementations of a system that incorporate one or more of the features of the present disclosure and fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.