Title:
Woven chair
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A woven chair is disclosed as having a frame with first and second end bars opposed from each other, the first and second end bars spanning opposed side bars, and a first end secondary bar extending parallel to the first end bar and spanning the side bars. The chair may also include a first end tertiary bar spanning the side bars. Yarn may be configured around the bars to form a woven chair. In other embodiments, a chair frame may have an outer main frame with a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars and inner framing engaged with the outer frame, the inner framing comprising a plurality of inner bars, at least one of the plurality of inner bars being adjacent to each of the end bars and side bars, each of the bars being utilized to weave yarn to form a woven chair.



Inventors:
Hou, Chuan Kuei (Taipei Hsien, TW)
Application Number:
11/283597
Publication Date:
05/24/2007
Filing Date:
11/18/2005
Assignee:
Sun Isle USA, LLC (Boca Raton, FL, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C7/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
DUNN, DAVID R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LERNER, DAVID, LITTENBERG, (Cranford, NJ, US)
Claims:
1. A woven chair comprising: a frame having: a first end bar and a second end bar opposed from said first end bar, a first side bar extending between said first end bar and said second end bar and a second side bar opposed from said first side bar extending between said first end bar and said second end bar; a first end secondary bar extending parallel to said first end bar and spanning said first side bar and said second side bar; wherein yarn may be configured around said first end bar, second end bar, first side bar, second side bar, and first end secondary bar to form a woven chair.

2. The woven chair of claim 1, further comprising a first side secondary bar adjacent said first side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around said first side secondary bar to form a woven chair.

3. The woven chair of claim 2, further comprising a second side secondary bar adjacent said second side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around said second side secondary bar to form a woven chair.

4. The woven chair of claim 3, further comprising a first end tertiary bar extending parallel to said first end bar, wherein yarn may be configured around said first end tertiary bar to form a woven chair.

5. The woven chair of claim 4, further comprising a second end secondary bar extending parallel to said second end bar and spanning said first side bar and said second side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around said second end bar to form a woven chair.

6. The woven chair of claim 5, further comprising a second end tertiary bar extending parallel to said second end bar, wherein yarn may be configured around said second end tertiary bar to form a woven chair.

7. The woven chair of claims 1, wherein said yarn is warp yarn and weft yarn.

8. The woven chair of claim 1, wherein said frame further comprises a plurality of attachment mechanisms, said plurality of attachment mechanisms adapted to permit attachment of said frame to a base.

9. The woven chair of claim 8, wherein said plurality of attachment mechanisms are a plurality of bosses.

10. The woven chair of claim 1, further comprising a rear support strut extending between said first side bar and said second side bar.

11. The woven chair of claim 10, further comprising a front support strut extending between said first side bar and said second side bar.

12. The woven chair of claim 1, wherein said first side bar and said second side bar are curvilinear.

13. A chair frame comprising: an outer main frame having a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars in continuous relation, inner framing engaged with said outer frame, said inner framing comprising a plurality of inner bars, at least one of said plurality of inner bars being adjacent to each of said end bars and said side bars, wherein each of said bars may be utilized to weave yarn to form a woven chair.

14. The chair frame of claim 13, wherein said bars forming said outer main frame have a first diameter and said bars forming said inner framing have a second diameter.

15. The chair of claim 14, wherein said first diameter is greater than said second diameter.

16. The chair of claim 13, wherein said plurality of inner bars includes two inner bars adjacent to each of said end bars.

17. The chair of claim 13, further comprising a support strut spanning said pair of side bars.

18. The chair of claim 17, further comprising a second support strut spanning said pair of side bars.

19. The chair of claim 13, further comprising attachment mechanisms associated with said outer main frame, said attachment mechanisms adapted to attach to a base.

20. A method of weaving a woven chair having an outer main frame with a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars in continuous relation, and a plurality of inner bars, at least one of the inner bars being adjacent to each of the end bars and side bars, the method comprising: attaching warp yarn to the inner bar adjacent the first of the side bars of the outer main frame; wrapping the warp yarn around the first of the side bars of the outer main frame; extending the warp yarn across the outer main frame to the second of the side bars; wrapping the warp yarn around the second of the side bars and the adjacent inner bar; wrapping the warp yarn around the inner bar adjacent the second of the side bars to create an offset; wrapping the warp yarn around the second of the side bars and the adjacent inner bar; and, extending the warp yarn back across the outer main frame to the first of the side bars.

21. The method of claim 20, further comprising the step of weaving a weft yarn around the frame and the warp yarn to create a woven area.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates in general to the field of furniture constructed with structural frames and woven materials, and more particularly, to furniture constructed with frames featuring elements adapted to permit the woven material to remain in a tight configuration, even after extended use. The frame of the present invention also includes features permitting the woven material to completely cover the frame, and not leave gaps in the woven material where the frame may be exposed.

Natural wicker has been used in the manufacture of furniture, baskets, and other articles for many centuries. Natural wicker articles are conventionally manufactured from the twigs or branches of various plants. The twigs and branches are first soaked in water to make them pliable, then woven to form an article which holds form once the twigs and branches are permitted to dry. Furniture manufactured from wicker offers great comfort due to wicker's natural compliancy. Further, wicker is light weight and reasonably strong, making it especially suited for manufacture of furniture.

The popularity of wicker furniture continues to increase. The casual, informal appearance of wicker has made it especially popular for use in enclosed porches and other informal settings in homes, hotels, and other establishments. Natural wicker, however, has had limited use in the outdoor furniture market, including patio furniture, pool furniture, and the like. This disfavor is partially due to natural wicker's tendency to soften and weaken when wet, as the natural material regains some of its pliancy. In addition, after being moistened, natural wicker is more susceptible to rotting and promoting mildew growth than many other natural and synthetic furniture materials.

Woven wicker typically comprises a warp yarn, i.e., a yarn running straight through the woven material between a frame to provide support and a weft yarn, i.e., a yarn used as a filler material that is woven around the warp yarn. Numerous styles of weave are used in the manufacture of wicker furniture. The various styles of weave result in different looks, feels, strengths, and weights of the finished woven product. In a simple weave pattern, the warp yarns are spaced apart and arranged parallel to each other. The weft yarns are then woven over and under the warp yarns in an alternating pattern. Adjacent weft yarns pass on opposite sides of a given warp yarn. Variations of this pattern, such as passing the weft yarn over two adjacent warp yarns, are also known in the art.

Various synthetic yarns have now been introduced to manufacture wicker-like furniture. As in the case of natural wicker, the synthetic yarns are woven into a woven material of warp and weft weaves within a structural frame. Typically, the structural frame is manufactured from various metals or alloys thereof. Such synthetic materials may be more environmentally stable than typical natural wicker. Given the stable characteristics of the synthetic materials used, such furniture featuring synthetic yarns have found popularity in the-outdoor furniture market, including patio furniture, pool furniture, and the like. The synthetic yarn woven material has also been found popular for indoor use.

Notwithstanding this newfound popularity, it has been found that the conventional weave patterns utilized for manufacturing furniture, and particularly chairs, tend to become loosened over time. This slackening of the weave material is aesthetically unpleasing, as the previously consistent overall look of the article may be compromised. In severe cases, the slackening of the weave material may adversely affect the structural integrity of the article of furniture by leaving large gaps in the weave pattern.

In the case of woven chairs, the seat portion is particularly susceptible to such slackening as the weight of individuals utilizing the chairs may stretch the synthetic warp and weft material over the course of repetitive use. Even if the warp and weft material's actual length remains constant, conventional frames and weaving techniques may cause the material to work its way tighter and tighter around the frame, thus loosening the interior portions of the weave. In addition, conventional frames and weave patterns typically leave gaps in the weave where the frame is exposed. These gaps are considered unsightly and tend to increase in size through use of the article.

The present invention has arisen to solve the need for a furniture, frame which supports a weave system having features that prevent the weave system from slackening, and which creates and overall more aesthetically appealing article of furniture by, for example, completely covering the frame and not leaving any sizeable gaps.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention overcomes the shortcomings of the prior art by providing, in various combinations, a woven chair having a novel frame and novel weave system, which substantially hides the frame from view and limits slackening of the weave pattern.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a woven chair may include a frame with first and second end bars opposed from each other, the first and second end bars spanning opposed side bars, and a first end secondary bar extending parallel to the first end bar and spanning the side bars. The chair may also include a first end tertiary bar spanning the side bars. The chair may also include a second end secondary bar and second end tertiary bar, each parallel to the second end bar. Yarn may be configured around the bars (whichever are provided) to form a woven chair. The woven chair may also include front and rear support struts, and attachment mechanisms to attach the chair to a base.

In accordance with other aspects of the present invention, a chair frame may have an outer main frame with a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars and inner framing engaged with the outer frame. The inner framing may comprise a plurality of inner bars, at least one of the plurality of inner bars being adjacent to each of the end bars and side bars. Each of the bars may be utilized to weave yarn to form a woven chair.

In accordance with still further aspects of the present invention, a woven chair may comprise a frame having a first end bar and a second end bar opposed from the first end bar, a first side bar extending between the first end bar and the second end bar and a second side bar opposed from the first side bar extending between the first end bar and the second end bar, and a first end secondary bar extending parallel to the first end bar and spanning the first side bar and the second side bar. Yarn may be configured around the first end bar, second end bar, first side bar, second side bar, and first end secondary bar to form a woven chair.

The woven chair may further comprise a first side secondary bar adjacent to the first side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around the first side secondary bar to form a woven chair. The woven chair may further comprise a second side secondary bar, adjacent to the second side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around the second side secondary bar to form a woven chair. The woven chair may still further comprise a first end tertiary bar extending parallel to the first end bar, wherein yarn may be configured around the first end tertiary bar to form a woven chair. The woven chair may further comprise a second end secondary bar extending parallel to the second end bar and spanning the first side bar and the second side bar, wherein yarn may be configured around the second end bar to form a woven chair. The woven chair may further comprise a second end tertiary bar extending parallel to the second end bar, wherein yarn may be configured around the second end tertiary bar to form a woven chair.

In any of the previous configurations, the woven chair yarn may be comprised of warp yarn and weft yarn.

In any of the previous configurations, the frame may further comprise a plurality of attachment mechanisms, the plurality of attachment mechanisms adapted to permit attachment of the frame to a base. The plurality of attachment mechanisms may be a plurality of bosses.

In any of the previous configurations, the woven chair may further comprise a rear support strut extending between the first side bar and the second side bar. The woven chair may further comprise a front support strut extending between the first side bar and the second side bar.

The first side bar and the second side bar may be curvilinear.

In accordance with additional aspects of the present invention, a chair frame may comprise an outer main frame having a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars in continuous relation, and inner framing engaged with the outer frame. The inner framing may comprise a plurality of inner bars, at least one of the plurality of inner bars being adjacent to each of the end bars and the side bars. Each of the bars may be utilized to weave yarn to form a woven chair.

The bars forming the outer main frame may have a first diameter and the bars forming the inner framing may have a second diameter. The first diameter may be greater than the second diameter.

The plurality of inner bars may include two inner bars adjacent to each of the end bars.

The chair may further comprise a support strut spanning the pair of side bars. The chair may further comprise a second support strut spanning the pair of side bars.

The chair may further comprise attachment mechanisms associated with the outer main frame, the attachment mechanisms adapted to attach to a base.

In accordance with still further aspects of the present invention, a method of weaving a woven chair having an outer main frame with a pair of end bars and a pair of side bars in continuous relation, and a plurality of inner bars with at least one of the inner bars being adjacent to each of the end bars and side bars, may comprise attaching warp yarn to the inner bar adjacent the first of the side bars of the outer main frame, wrapping the warp yarn around the first of the side bars of the outer main frame, extending the warp yarn across the outer main frame to the second of the side bars, wrapping the warp yarn around the second of the side bars and the adjacent inner bar, wrapping the warp yarn around the inner bar adjacent the second of the side bars to create an offset, wrapping the warp yarn around the second of the side bars and the adjacent inner bar, and extending the warp yarn back across the outer main frame to the first of the side bars.

The method may further comprise the step of weaving a weft yarn around the frame and the warp yarn to create a woven area.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter regarded as the invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the concluding portion of the specification. The invention, however, both as to organization and methods of operation, together with features objects, and advantages thereof, may be best understood by reference to the following detailed description when read with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 depicts a perspective view of a partially complete woven chair in accordance with certain aspects of the present invention;

FIG. 2 depicts a blown-up plan view of a portion of the woven chair shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 depicts a blown-up plan view of a portion of a woven chair depicting a weave pattern known in the prior art;

FIG. 4 depicts a blown-up view of a portion of a woven chair depicting a weave pattern in accordance with further aspects of the present invention;

FIG. 5 depicts a frame forming a portion of the woven chair shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 depicts a portion of the frame shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 depicts a step in the method of weaving the warp yarn of the woven chair shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 depicts a further step in the method of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 depicts still a further step in the method of FIGS. 7-8;

FIG. 10 depicts another step in the method of FIGS. 7-9;

FIG. 11 depicts an additional step in the method of FIGS. 7-10;

FIG. 12 depicts the frame of FIG. 5 in a partially woven condition, showing an intermediate condition of warp yarn weaving;

FIG. 13 depicts a blown-up view of the frame of FIG. 5 in a partially woven condition, showing both warp yarn and weft yarn;

FIG. 14 depicts a step in the method of weaving the weft yarn of the woven chair shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 15 depicts a further step in the method of FIG. 14; and,

FIG. 16 depicts another step in the method of FIGS. 14-15.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the following are described the preferred embodiments of the woven chair in accordance with the present invention. In describing the embodiments illustrated in the drawings, specific terminology will be used for the sake of clarity. However, the invention is not intended to be limited to the specific terms so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents that operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar purpose. Where like elements have been depicted in multiple embodiments, identical reference numerals have been used in the multiple embodiments for ease of understanding.

The woven chair of the present invention improves on the prior art by providing for a woven chair that is configured to prevent the woven material from slackening, and is configured to provide a tight nearly gapless weave that hides the frame.

A perspective view of a partially completed woven chair is shown in FIG. 1. As shown, the woven chair 100 may comprise a frame 102 covered with woven material 104, as is conventionally known in the art. It will be appreciated that the woven chair depicted in FIG. 1 is only partially complete, with the woven material consisting of both weft and warp weaves on the finished side 106 and only warp weaves on the unfinished side 108. As shown on the finished side, the woven chair 100 is bounded by a finished edge 110. As will be discussed, the use of a frame 102 comprising multiple parallel bars permits the finished edge to be weaved to a very tight configuration, with very few visible gaps.

FIG. 2 depicts a cut-away view of the finished side 106 of woven chair 100 depicting a detail of finished edge 110 in accordance with certain aspects of the present invention. The woven material 104 comprises warp yarn 112 and weft yarn 114 weaved together. The warp yarn 112 is typically a yarn running straight through the woven material between a frame 102 to provide support while the weft yarn 114 is used as a filler material that is woven around the warp yarn. The warp yarns 112 are typically woven first, with the weft yarns 114 then woven over and under the warp yarns in an alternating pattern. Adjacent weft yarns 114 pass on opposite sides of a given warp yarn 112. Variations of this pattern may also be utilized.

It will be appreciated that the woven material 104 of FIG. 2 is tight and completely full, such that only very small gaps 116 are formed. This tight weave is achieved, as will be discussed, through the novel use of a frame 102 having multiple parallel bars. In the prior art, such frames were not known.

For example, FIG. 3 depicts a cut-away view of the finished side 106′ of a woven chair 100′ as known in the prior art. In this example, and although not shown, the frame includes only a single bar. Because of this frame configuration, the weft yarn 114′ must be woven around the finished edge 110′ without any warp yarn 112′, leaving large gaps 116′. The large gaps 116′ are not only unsightly, but also tend to permit the woven material 104′ to sag over time. This compromises the structural integrity of the woven chair 100′, and is undesirable.

FIG. 4 depicts a cut-away view of the finished side 106″ of a woven chair 100″ in accordance with one aspect of the present invention. In this example, and although not shown, the frame includes two parallel bars. Owing to this frame configuration, the weft yarn 114″ may be woven around both bars at the finished edge 110″ to pull the weft yarn tighter than may be achieved with a single bar. This contributes to a reduction in the size of the gaps over the single bar prior art woven chair 100′, shown in FIG. 3. Notwithstanding, the use of a two bar frame still prevents the weaving of a warp yarn in the finished edge 110″ area, thus allowing some gaps 116″ in the woven material 104″. As such, it will be appreciated that the three bar configuration is the most preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Shown in FIG. 5 is a frame 102 constructed in accordance with the aforementioned and preferred three bar arrangement. As shown, the frame 102 includes a main frame 120 at the exterior-most limits. The main frame 102 comprises a first end bar 122 and second end bar 124, each spanning between opposed first and second side bars 126, 128. Each of the bars forming the main frame 120 are preferably cylindrical, with a consistent diameter. The bars are preferably formed from metal or alloys thereof, with the connections between bars preferably being welded. Other materials may also be utilized, as discussed below.

Offset from the first end bar 122, and spanning between the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128, is a first end secondary bar 130. Similarly, offset from the second end bar 124, and spanning between the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128 is a second end secondary bar 132. The first end secondary bar 130 and second end secondary bar 124 are preferably formed from the same material as the bars of the main frame 120 and may be connected thereto by the same connection means used to connect the bars of the main frame. Similarly, the first end secondary bar 130 and second end secondary bar 132 are preferably cylindrical, although preferably with a diameter of less than that of the bars of the main frame 120.

Also offset from the first end bar 122, and spanning between the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128, is a first end tertiary bar 134. The first end tertiary bar 134 is preferably mounted between the first end bar 122 and first end secondary bar 130. Similarly, offset from the second end bar 124, and spanning between the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128 is a second end tertiary bar 136. The second end tertiary bar is preferably mounted between the second end bar 124 and the second end secondary bar 132. The first end tertiary bar 134 and second end tertiary bar 136 are also preferably cylindrical, with a diameter sized between that of the end bars 122, 124 and secondary bars 130, 132.

Although the tertiary bars 134, 136 span the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128, and may be attached to the side bars by the same connection means used to connect the bars of the main frame, the tertiary bars may also be attached to the first end bar 122 and second end bar 124 by filler bars 138. Preferably, four such filler bars are utilized, although the total number may vary. The fillers bars are typically also cylindrical, and may be of a diameter similar to that of the tertiary bars 134, 136.

As further shown in FIG. 5, the frame 102 may comprise a back area 140 and a seat area 142, to form the back and seat portions of the finished woven chair 100. As in a conventional chair, the back area 140 is configured to be a generally vertical plane in the finished product with the seat area 142 being a generally horizontal plane. A person may therefore sit upon the seat area 142 while resting their back against the back area 140. It will be appreciated, therefore, that the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128 may be configured in curvilinear fashion to bend into a generally L-shaped composition to help form the seat area 142 and back area 140, as best shown in FIG. 1.

It is also shown in FIG. 5 that the back area 140 and seat area 142 may be separated by a rear support strut 144 spanning between the second side bar 128 and first side bar 126. The rear support strut 144 is preferably formed from the same material as the bars of the main frame 120 and may be connected thereto by the same connection means used to connect the bars of the main frame, preferably welding in the case of metallic bars. Further, the rear support strut 144 may be formed to approximately the same diameter as the bars of the main frame 120. One function of the rear support strut 144 is to provide for structural support of the frame 102, and not necessarily to have woven materials woven directly thereto.

The frame 102 may also comprise a front support strut 146 extending between the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128, toward the front of the seat area 142 near the second end bar 124. The front support strut 146 may be formed to approximately the same diameter as the bars of the main frame and 120 and the rear support strut 144. In addition, the front support strut is preferably formed from the same material as the bars of the main frame 120 and may be connected thereto by the same connection means used to connect the bars of the main frame, preferably welding in the case metallic bars. The front support strut 146 is typically utilized as a structural support for the main frame 120, but may also be used to support other bars.

Such bars include a seat area first side secondary bar 148. The seat area first side secondary bar 148 may extend between the front support strut 146 and the first side bar 126. Preferably, the seat area first side secondary bar 148 extends generally parallel to the first side bar 126, and attaches thereto in the back area 140, after bending toward the first side bar 126 in the general vicinity of the rear support strut 144. The seat area first side secondary bar 148 may also be connected to the first side bar 126 by one or more filler bars 138.

Similarly, a seat area second side secondary bar 150 may extend between the front support strut 146 and the second side bar 128. Preferably, the seat area second side secondary bar 150 extends generally parallel to the second side bar 128, and attaches thereto in the back area 140 after bending toward the second side bar 128 in the general vicinity of the rear support strut 144. The seat area second side secondary bar 150 may also be connected to the second side bar 128 by one or more filler bars 138.

In addition to the seat area first side secondary bar 148 and the seat area second side secondary bar 150, a back area first side secondary bar 152 and a back area second side secondary bar 152 may extend parallel to the fist side bar 126 and second side bar 128, respectively. In this regard, the back area first side secondary bar 152 may connect to the first side bar 126 in the back area 140, and then bend to extend parallel to the first side bar until the back area first side secondary bar culminates at a connection with the first end secondary bar 130. The back area second side secondary bar 154 may connect to the second side bar 128 in the back area 140, and then bend to extend parallel to the second side bar until the back area second side secondary bar culminates at a connection with the first end secondary bar 130. The back area first side secondary bar 152 and the back area second side secondary bar 154 may also be connected to the first side bar 126 and second side bar 128, respectively, by one or more filler bars 138.

Each of the seat area first side secondary bar 148, seat area second side secondary bar 150, back area first side secondary bar 152, and back area second side secondary bar 154 may be of a diameter similar to that of the first end tertiary bar 134 and second end tertiary bar 136. Further, the seat area first side secondary bar 148, seat area second side secondary bar 150, back area first side secondary bar 152, and back area second side secondary bar 154 are preferably formed from the same material as the bars of the main frame 120 and may be connected thereto and to the front support strut 146 or first end secondary bar 130, as appropriate, by the same connection means used to connect the bars of the main frame, preferably welding in the case of metallic bars.

As also shown in FIG. 5, the frame 102 may include a plurality of attachment mechanisms from attaching the frame 102 to a base. In preferred embodiments, the attachment mechanisms are bosses 156. Preferably, four total bosses are included, two in the back area 140 and two in the seat area 142. The bosses may be welded to the first side bar 126 or second side bar 128, and may include internally tapped threads (not shown). The bosses 156 may be utilized to attach the frame 102 to a chair base (not shown), such that the woven chair 100 may be completed. Bases appropriate for connection to the frame 102 are well known in the industry, and typically include a frame structure having four legs for stability.

FIG. 6 depicts a blow-up view of a portion of FIG. 5, showing the first end bar 122, first end secondary bar 130, and first end tertiary bar 134, among other features of the frame 102, in greater clarity. Although not necessarily to scale, in this view one may appreciate the relative diameters of the respective bars, and their general locations within the frame 102.

In order to weave the warp yarn 112 and weft yarn 114 into woven material 104 covering the frame 102, the practitioner may utilize any number of weaving patterns. An exemplary weaving pattern is disclosed herein as follows. Although the weave pattern discussed in the following begins at a location near the rear support strut 144, it will be appreciated that the start point may be anywhere along the first side bar 126 or second side bar 128. The weave pattern may also be stopped and restarted at various locations.

As shown in FIG. 7, depicting a blown-up view of the woven chair 100 in the area of the intersection of the first side bar 126 and rear support strut 144, a practitioner P may tie a knot 158 around the seat area first side secondary bar 148 with warp yarn 112. The practitioner P may then thread the warp yarn 112 under the first side bar 126, as shown by arrow A in FIG. 7. Preferably, the warp yarn 112 is grouped in a set of three parallel strands, such that three strands are stitched simultaneously and directly adjacent to each other in a tight configuration. In other embodiments, a single strand or two strands may be utilized. In still other embodiments, greater than three strands may also be used.

Moving to FIG. 8, it is shown that the warp yarn 112 may then be brought over the first side bar 126 and seat area first side secondary bar 148 and across the seat area 142 of the woven chair 100 toward the second side bar 128 (not shown in FIG. 8), along the direction indicated by arrow B.

As shown in FIG. 9, depicting a blown-up view of the woven chair 100 in the area of the intersection of the second side bar 128 and rear support strut 144, the practitioner may then extend the warp yarn 112 over the second side bar 128 along arrow C. Once so extended, the warp yarn 112 may then be brought under the second side bar 128 and seat area second side secondary bar 150 toward the seat area 142 of the woven chair 100. The warp yarn 112 may then be dropped down toward the second end bar (not shown in FIG. 9) and brought back over the seat area second side secondary bar 150 and the second side bar 128 along arrow D, to the position shown in FIG. 9.

As shown in FIG. 10, depicting the same view as FIG. 9, the warp yarn 112 may be brought back under the second side bar 128 along arrow E toward the seat area 142, and then brought up between the seat area second side secondary bar 150 and the second side bar 128. The warp yarn 112 may then wrapped around the seat area second side secondary bar 150 one time and then brought under the seat area second side secondary bar and the second side bar 128 along arrow F to the position shown in FIG. 10.

The warp yarn 112 may then be brought over the second side bar 128 and second side secondary bar 150, across the seat area 142, to the first side bar 126, where the weaving pattern is repeated bringing the warp yarn back to the second side bar 128. The weaving pattern is again repeated leaving the yarn configuration shown in FIG. 11. It will be appreciated that wrapping of the warp yarn 112 around the seat area second side secondary bar 150 and the seat area first side secondary bar 148 as discussed offsets parallel groups of three strands of warp yarn such that a gap 116 is left for the later weaving of the weft yarn 114, as will be discussed.

This stitching pattern may be repeated continuously until the entire seat area 142 and back area 140 are stitched with warp yarn 112. A partially stitched woven chair 100 is shown in FIG. 12. Throughout this repetitious stitch pattern, it will be appreciated that the warp yarn 112 need not be a continuous strand. Rather, as lengths of warp yarn 112 reach their limits, the length may be glued or tied to one of the first side bar 126 or second side bar 128, and another strand started just adjacent thereto. In addition, as previously discussed, the warp yarn 112 weaving pattern may begin at various chair locations.

Once the entire chair is stitched with warp yarn 112, stitching of the weft yarn 114 to create the woven material 104 of the woven chair 100 may begin. As shown in FIG. 13, the weft yarn 114 may be woven in a direction perpendicular to the warp yarn 112, over and under the warp yarns in an alternating pattern. Adjacent weft yarns 114 may therefore pass on opposite sides of a given warp yarn 112 in a tight configuration to leave very small gaps 116. Preferably, the gaps are small enough that one may not readily see the bars underneath, including the first side bar 126 and seat area first side secondary bar 148, identified in FIG. 12 with dashed lines for clarity.

To create the woven material 104 of the woven chair 100 referenced above, stitching of the weft yarns 114 may begin at the first end bar 122, as shown in FIG. 14. In this regard, the weft yarn 114 may be glued to the first end bar 122 at an end 115 of the weft yarn. Suitable glues include those glues identified above as being appropriate for the warp yarn 112.

The weft yarn 114 may then be brought over the first end bar 122 along arrow G and then behind the backside of the first end bar to the first end secondary bar 130. The weft yarn 114 may then be brought over the first end secondary bar 130 along arrow H and threaded under the first end tertiary bar 134 and adjacent the first end bar 122 along arrow I to the position shown in FIG. 14.

Once in the position shown in FIG. 14, the weft yarn 114 may then be brought toward the back area 140 of the chair over the first end tertiary bar 134 along arrow J. The weft yarn 114 may then be brought under the first end secondary bar 130 along arrow K and back over the first end bar 122 toward the back area 140 along arrow L, as shown in FIG. 15.

Once facing the direction of the back area 140 following this procedure, the weft yarn 114 may be threaded between the warp yarns 112 and through the entire back area and seat area 142 until reaching the vicinity of the second end bar 124, where the pattern is repeated such that the weft yarn is stitched around the second end bar 124, second end secondary bar 132, and second end tertiary bar 136. After repeating the pattern, the weft yarn may then be brought back up toward the first end bar 122, by again weaving between the warp yarns 112 through the seat area 142 and back area 140. It will be appreciated that multiple passes of this pattern will fill in the frame 102 of the woven chair 100, to create the woven material 104.

Preferably, when weaving the weft yarn 114, successive passes are brought directly adjacent the previously threaded pass, such that the weft yarn being threaded is tight against the woven material 104.

FIG. 16 depicts a detail of a corner of the frame 102, where the first end bar 122 meets the first side bar 126. It will be appreciated that in order to create a smooth finish to the woven material 104, the weft yarn 114 brought up to the first end bar 122 along the first side bar 126 may be trimmed at an end 160 and tucked under adjacent weft yarn, such that the ends 160 are hidden from view.

Although the bars of frame 102 have been described as being formed from metals or alloys thereof with welded ends, it will be appreciated that various other materials and suitable connections may be utilized. For example, the bars may be formed from structurally appropriate plastics with glued, chemical welded, or mechanically secured end connections. Various other more exotic materials may also be utilized, such as composites including fiberglass or carbon fiber. Combinations of these materials may also be utilized to take advantage of the strengths of each. For example, a fiberglass bar may be laminated and joined with metallic ends, such that the metallic ends may then be welded whereas fiberglass cannot.

The weft and warp yarns are typically synthetic, as known in the industry.

Although the invention herein has been described with reference to particular embodiments, it is to be understood that these embodiments are merely illustrative of the principles and applications of the present invention. It is therefore to be understood that numerous modifications may be made to the illustrative embodiments and that other arrangements may be devised without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.