Title:
Paint storage and touch-up container
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A paint storage and touch-up container that is specifically designed for storing architectural paint, one that provides a convenient pop-off top and opening, in addition to the conventional lid, to perform quick touch-up paint jobs. The container also provides a stable stacking construction, a sleeve to store paint data and a built-in color sample space.



Inventors:
Randall, Susan M. (Solon, IA, US)
Kahn, Kathryn (North Liberty, IA, US)
Application Number:
11/281320
Publication Date:
05/17/2007
Filing Date:
11/17/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D21/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
ELOSHWAY, NIKI MARINA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MCKEE, VOORHEES & SEASE, P.L.C. (DES MOINES, IA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A container for storing a paint while providing convenient access to the paint for touch-up painting, comprising: a paint container body for storing the paint; a lid removably connected to the paint container body; an aperture in the lid; a pop-off top removably positioned over the aperture in the lid; and a finger grip operatively connected to the pop-off top to assist in removing the pop-off top to thereby provide access to the paint for touch-up painting.

2. The paint container body of claim 1 further comprising a top and a bottom adapted for stacking.

3. The paint container body of claim 2 wherein the bottom further comprises a recess positioned at the center of the bottom, the recess being shaped and sized to accommodate the lid.

4. The paint container body of claim 3 wherein the bottom is connected to the paint container body defining an interior volume, the paint container body comprising a handle, the handle further comprising a rubber finger grip for grasping.

5. The paint container body of claim 4 wherein a shoulder is connected to the paint container body at the top of the paint container body, a raised collar being connected to the shoulder providing an opening for accessing the interior volume.

6. The paint container body of claim 5 wherein the lid is operatively secured to the raised collar to close off the opening.

7. The paint container body of claim 6 wherein the aperture further comprises an annular edge, the aperture being positioned at the center of the lid for accessing the interior volume.

8. The paint container body of claim 7 wherein the pop-off top comprises a gasket to seat against the edge for sealing off the aperture, the pop-off top further comprises a divot positioned at the center of the pop-off top, the divot providing a color sample space for the paint.

9. The paint container body of claim 8 wherein a sample of the paint is disposed within the color sample space.

10. The paint container body of claim 8 wherein the paint container body contains an architectural paint.

11. The container of claim 9 wherein the body further comprises a sleeve operatively attached for storing paint data.

12. The container of claim 10 wherein a paint applicator placed through the aperture in the lid has access to the paint for touch-up painting.

13. A paint storage and touch-up container, comprising: (a) a plastic receptacle defined by a body having a top, a bottom and an interior volume for storing a paint, the body comprising: a base connected to the body at the bottom of the body; a shoulder connected to the body at the top of the body; and a collar connected to the shoulder, the collar being raised and forming a cylindrical opening therethrough to access the paint; (b) an integral finger grip handle forming part of the body, the handle interconnecting the base and the shoulder and forming a hollow channel therethrough; (c) a lid having a diameter and a center, the lid engaging the collar to close off the opening, the lid further comprising a second cylindrical opening, the second opening being positioned at the center of the lid, the second opening having a diameter smaller than the diameter of the lid, the second opening allowing accessing to the paint for touch-up painting; (d) a pop-off top housing a gasket, the gasket seating against the second cylindrical opening to close off the opening, the pop-off top further comprising a pull ring operatively attached, the pull ring for grasping and removing the pop-off top; and (e) a recess formed within the base, the recess being shaped and sized to accommodate the lid, the base and the recess having a stacking construction, the shoulder supporting the base when stacked.

14. The container of claim 13 wherein the pop-off top further comprises a divot positioned in the center of the pop-off top, the divot providing a space for a color sample of the paint.

15. The container of claim 13 wherein a paint applicator fits through the second cylindrical opening for touch-up painting.

16. The container of claim 13 wherein the finger grip handle is preferably a polymeric material having contours fitting the finger for grasping and providing a no-slip grip.

17. The container of claim 13 having different sizes accommodating a ¼, ⅓, ½, ¾ and 1 gallon of the paint.

18. The container of claim 13 wherein the recess is sized and shaped to prevent movement during stacking.

19. The container of claim 13 wherein the paint is disposed within the container having a weight, the stacking construction distributing the weight of the container over the shoulder for stability.

20. A method for using a paint storage container adapted for touch-up painting, comprising: providing a paint container body for storing the paint, a lid removably connected to the paint container body, an aperture in the lid, a pop-off top removably positioned over the aperture in the lid, and a finger grip operatively connected to the pop-off top to assist in removing the pop-off top to thereby provide access to the paint for touch-up painting; removing the lid from the paint container body; filling the paint container body with an architectural paint; closing off the paint container body with the lid; removing the pop-off top from the aperture positioned in the center of the lid for accessing the paint; reaching through the aperture in the lid with a paint applicator for touch-up painting; and closing off the aperture in the lid with the pop-off top.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a plastic storage container for architectural paints which has a convenient pop-off top removable for performing touch-up painting. Containers used to store an architectural paint generally have a body with a removable attached lid for closing off the body. The body typically houses a handle or secures a pail-like handle for grasping. The lids generally are secured to the container by threads and prevent paint from leaking, spilling and drying. Some containers have specially designed spouts engineered into the container opening for substantially dripless dispensing. Others, considering the possibility of dried paint gathering on and binding up the threads, have taken special measures to insure easier removal of the lid. These include special handles attached to or molded into the lid giving the user some mechanical advantage to overcome thread binding. Still, some stacking construction measures have been taken to allow these containers to be stacked, one on top of the other.

One disadvantage of the conventional plastic paint container is that its design fails to consider how a user actually uses the container. In particular, users often forego using a paint tray in place of simply using the plastic paint container to paint quick touch-up jobs. This poses a problem that vexes users of the conventional plastic paint container. It is not unusual for paint to drip onto the threads or the interface between the lid and the container. Over time, the paint collects and the lid becomes increasingly difficult to remove or attach. Thus, the conventional plastic paint container does not have special provisions to accommodate use for quick touch-up jobs.

Another convenience conventional plastic paint containers fail to realize is a stable stacking construction. Conventional containers typically have a receptacle rib and cover recess construction for stacking. Even so, these containers exhibit poor stability when only a few are stacked on top of each other. Densities nearing 13 pounds per gallon for a typical architectural paint, warrant consideration for an alternative stacking construction. Still, conventional plastic paint containers typically do not allow the user to have ready access to information regarding the color-coding or a sampling of the paint contained within the container. Some have used a permanent marker to scribe such information on the side of the container, yet this data may not accurately describe the next batch of paint stored in the container. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative plastic paint container that is specifically designed for storing paint, one that provides a convenient opening, in addition to the conventional lid, to perform quick touch-up paint jobs, a stable stacking construction, a sleeve to store paint data, and, a built-in color sample space.

Therefore, a primary object of the present invention is the provision of an improved plastic paint storage container, adapted for quick touch-up painting jobs and stacking.

A further object of the present invention is to replace an existing plastic paint container, having a stacking construction prone to instability and a lid susceptible to binding, with a plastic paint container having a stable stacking construction and clean unbound threads.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container having a stacking construction that is stable and remains stable when the containers are filled with an architectural paint and stacked one on top of the other.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a stacking construction wherein the weight of the stacked containers is supported by the outer periphery of the container.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the bottom of the container is fitted with a recess to accommodate the lid when stacked.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the interlocking of the lid with the recess in the bottom of the container creates a stable and rigid stacking construction.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the lid is fitted with a pop-off top.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the pop-off top has a gasket to seal off an aperture in the lid.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein removing the pop-off top from the lid permits a paint applicator access to the body of paint within the container for performing touch-up work.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the lid need not be removed from the top of the container to perform touch-up painting.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the pop-off top has a ledge, rim, flange, finger grip or knob for grasping and removing the pop-off top from the aperture in the lid.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the pop-off top has a divot, positioned on the top of the pop-off top, which serves as a built-in color sample space.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the handle is formed into the body of the paint container.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the handle is contoured to fit fingers.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the handle provides a no-slip surface for gripping.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the container is sized to accommodate either ¼, ⅓, ½, ¾ and 1 gallon of paint.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the container is spill and rust proof.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a plastic paint container wherein the container is an air tight storage container for paint.

One or more of these and/or other objectives will become apparent from the following specification and claims.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The improved plastic container of the present invention stores paint while also providing convenient access to the paint for touch-up painting. The container includes a paint container body for storing the paint. A lid is removably connected to the paint container body. There is an aperture in the lid and a pop-off top is removably positioned over the aperture in the lid. A finger grip is operatively connected to the pop-off top to assist in removing the pop-off top to provide access to the paint for touch-up painting.

According to another feature of the present invention, the paint container body comprises a top and a bottom adapted for stacking.

According to another feature of the present invention the bottom further comprises a recess positioned at the center of the bottom. The recess is shaped and sized to accommodate the lid.

According to another feature of the present invention the bottom is connected to the paint container body that defines an interior volume. The paint container body comprises a handle fitted with a rubber finger grip for grasping.

According to another feature of the present invention the paint container body further comprises a shoulder connected to the paint container body at the top of the paint container body and a raised collar that is connected to the shoulder. The shoulder and raised collar provide an opening for accessing the interior volume of the paint container.

According to another feature of the present invention, the lid is operatively secured to the raised collar to close off the raised collar.

According to another feature of the present invention the lid comprises an aperture having an annular edge. The aperture is positioned at the center of the lid for accessing the interior volume of the paint container.

According to another feature of the present invention the pop-off top comprises a gasket to seat against the edge for sealing off the aperture, the pop-off top further comprises a divot positioned at the center of the pop-off top, the divot providing a color sample space for the paint.

According to another feature of the present invention, a sample of the paint is disposed within the color sample space.

According to another feature of the present invention, the paint container body contains an architectural paint.

According to another feature of the present invention, the body further comprises a sleeve operatively attached for storing paint data.

According to another feature of the present invention, the paint applicator is placed through the second opening and has access to the paint for touch-up painting.

According to another feature of the present invention is a method for using the paint storage container that is adapted for touch-up painting. The paint storage container has a paint container body for storing the paint. A lid is removably connected to the paint container body. There is an aperture in the lid and a pop-off top removably positioned over the aperture in the lid. Finger grips are operatively connected to the pop-off top to assist in removing the pop-off top to thereby provide access to the paint for touch-up painting. The paint storage container can be used by removing the lid from the paint container body; filling the paint container body with an architectural paint; closing off the paint container body with the lid; removing the pop-off top from the aperture positioned in the center of the lid for accessing the paint; reaching through the aperture in the lid with a paint applicator for touch-up painting; and, closing off the aperture in the lid with the pop-off top.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the paint container.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the disassembled paint container, including the pop-off top, lid and paint container body.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the paint container.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the pop-off top.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the paint container.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the painter container being stacked, one on top of another.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the paint container taken along lines 7-7 in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

As seen in FIG. 1, the numeral 10 refers generally to a paint container having a paint container body 12. Connected to the bottom 42 of the paint container body 12 is a base 48 having a recess 50. Connected to the top 44 of the paint container body 12 is a shoulder 14. A handle 16 having fingered contours 24 shaped to fit the fingers for grasping forms a part of the body 12. Preferably, the handle 16 forms a hollow channel 40 forming part of the paint container body 12. A lid 18 is removably connected above the shoulder 14 to a raised collar 32, shown in FIG. 2. A pop-off top 20 is removably connected to the an aperture 30 in the lid 18, shown in FIG. 2. The pop-off top 20 has a finger grip 22 operatively connected for grasping. Positioned on the top surface of the pop-off top 20 is divot providing a color sample space 26. The color sample space 26 provides a spot for the user to store a sample of the paint being stored in the container 10. The sample could be a paint sample or a sticker indicating the properties of the paint.

As best illustrated in FIG. 2, the lid 18 is removably secured to the paint container 12 by twist threads 34. The twist threads 34 are circumferentially spaced along the exterior of the raised collar 32 and on the interior of the lid 18. The lid 18 is threaded onto the raised collar 32 to close off the interior volume 38. The lid 18 seals against the raised collar 34 to prevent the paint within the interior volume 38 from spilling, leaking and drying. An aperture 30 is positioned in the lid 18 having an annular edge 28. A pop-off top 20 is sized and shaped to close of the aperture 30 in the lid 18. A finger grip 22, operatively connected to the top of the pop-off top 20, provides the user with a place for grasping and removing the pop-off top 20 from the aperture 30 in the lid 18. It is preferred that the finger grip 22 be used to remove the pop-off top 20, however, the finger grip 22 could also be a ledge, rim, flange or knob-for grasping and removing the pop-off top 22 from the aperture 30 in the lid 18. The pop-off top 20 houses a compliant gasket 46, as best shown in FIG. 4. The gasket 46 seats against the annular edge 28 to seal off the aperture 30. The seal formed between the annular edge 28 and the gasket 46 prevents the paint from leaking, spilling and drying. The gasket 46 is a compliant material preferred for use in matingly engaging a rigid surface. Similarly, the handle 16 is preferably fitted with a no-slip semi-compliant material for grasping and forming to the fingers.

FIGS. 3 and 5 illustrate the top and bottom views of the paint container 10, respectively. The top view illustrates best the shoulder 14 of the paint container 10. The shoulder 14 of the paint container 10 forms a footing to support the base 48 of the next paint container 10, when the containers 10 are stacked one on top of the other. The base 48 is similarly shaped and sized to rest flush against the shoulder 14 of the next container in stacking formation. FIG. 3 further illustrates the diameter size of the recess 50 with respect to the lid 18 diameter, the recess 50 diameter being slightly larger than the lid 18 diameter to prevent the containers 10 from shifting when one container 10 is stacked on top of another container 10. Thus, if the containers 10 are stacked one on top of the other as illustrated in FIG. 6, the combination of the wide stance of the shoulder 14 supporting the base 48 of the next container 10 and the lid 18 interlocking with the recess 50 of the next container 10, creates a firm and stable stacking construction. The stacking construction illustrated in FIG. 6 allows the user to stack the containers 10 when filled with architectural paint, one on top of the other without compromising the stability of the stacked containers 10. The stackability of the containers 10 is independent of the volume capacity for each container 10. Thus, a one-half gallon container 10 could be stacked on top of a gallon container 10 or a quarter gallon on top of a two-thirds gallon container 10, as shown in FIG. 6. Additionally, each container is configured with a paint data sleeve 52 attached to the body 12 of the paint container 10. The paint data sleeve 52 is preferably used to store information on the type and makeup of the paint being stored in each container 10, or otherwise identify the paint.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the paint container taken along lines 7-7 in FIG. 1. FIG. 7 best illustrates the surface mating that occurs between the lid 18 and the raised collar 32 when the lid 18 closes off the body of the container 12. FIG. 7 also illustrates the surface mating that occurs between the pop-off top 20 and the annular edge 28 forming the aperture 30 when the pop-off top closes off the aperture 30 in the lid 18. In particular, the threads 34 are circumferentially arranged on the exterior of the raised collar 32 and the interior of the lid 18 allowing the lid 18 to be removably connected, yet seal off the paint container body 12 to prevent the paint from spilling, leaking and drying. Similarly, the pop-off top houses a gasket 46 that seats against the annular edge 28 to seal off the aperture 30 in the lid 18. FIG. 7 also shows the paint container body 12 having a broad shoulder 14 connected to the raised collar 32 and the wide stance of the base 48 being connected at the bottom 42 of the paint container body 12.

In operation according to one method of the present invention, the paint container body is for storing the paint. A lid is removably connected to the paint container body. There is an aperture in the lid and a pop-off top removably positioned over the aperture in the lid. To close off the aperture in the lid a finger grip is operatively connected to the pop-off top to assist in removing the pop-off top so that a user has access to the paint for touch-up painting. The paint container is used to perform touch-up painting by removing the lid from the paint container body which is filled with an architectural paint. By closing off the paint container body with the lid and removing the pop-off top from the aperture positioned in the center of the lid a user can reach through the aperture in the lid with a paint applicator for touch-up painting. The aperture in the lid can be closed after touch-up painting with the pop-off top.

In the drawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, these are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation. Changes in the form and the proportion of parts, the types of materials used, as well as in the substitution of equivalents are contemplated as circumstances may suggest or render expedient without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as further defined in the following claims.

For example, the present invention contemplates that the container may be constructed of materials other than plastic. The container may be sized and shaped differently, and use varying dimensions and materials to best accommodate manufacturing. The lid may be secured to the container and close off the opening in the body container using other means than a threaded lid. The handle may form a part of the body of the container, be secured to the body for grasping and lifting, be pivotally mounted and/or concealable within the structure of the body. The pop-off top may be secured to and seal off the aperture in the lid by means other than a gasket. The pop-off top may be larger and not necessarily form a circle centered in the lid. The pop-off top may be attached to the lid functioning more as a flip up lid, rather than being completely detachable from the lid. The stacking design may be sized and shaped to best accommodate manufacturing, yet form a sturdy and firm stacking construction.