Title:
Kit for making a toy gun, including instructions
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A kit for making a toy gun. The kit can include a set of instructions instructing the user on the proper process for making a toy gun, and a proper process for learning about gun safety while making the toy gun. The kit can comprise a plurality of blocks which can be made from any material but can be made from wood. These blocks can be glued or coupled together. The gun can ultimately be used to shoot elastic elements such as rubber bands.



Inventors:
Raviele, Thomas (College Point, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/266952
Publication Date:
05/10/2007
Filing Date:
11/04/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63H33/30
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FERNSTROM, KURT
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COLLARD & ROE, P.C. (ROSLYN, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A toy gun comprising: a) a trigger; b) a barrel wherein said barrel comprises i) an inner barrel section; ii) an outer barrel section; c) a handle wherein said handle is coupled to said barrel on said outer barrel section; d) a post coupled to said trigger, wherein said trigger is movable in a trigger slot formed between said barrel and said handle; e) an elastic element coupled to said handle, said elastic element for interacting with said post in said trigger, to drive said trigger back into its resting position.

2. The toy gun as in claim 1, wherein said elastic element is in the form of a rubber band.

3. The toy gun as in claim 2, further comprising at least one additional post coupled to said post, wherein said rubber band is coupled to said at least one additional post.

4. The toy gun as in claim 1 wherein said handle further comprises a hole for receiving said elastic element.

5. The toy gun as in claim 1, wherein said handle comprises: a) a first block having a hole; b) a plurality of bottom handle blocks; c) a plurality of outer blocks; d) a plurality of inner cover blocks, wherein said bottom handle blocks, said plurality of outer blocks and said inner cover blocks are all coupled to said first block.

6. The toy gun as in claim 1, wherein said barrel comprises: a) a plurality of barrel side pieces; b) a front barrel piece; c) and a stock, wherein said plurality of barrel side pieces are coupled to said front barrel piece and said stock to form said barrel.

7. A kit for making a gun comprising: a) a trigger; b) a plurality of barrel elements in the form of a elongated blocks; c) a plurality of handle elements in the form of elongated blocks; d) a set of instructions for putting said plurality of barrel elements, and said plurality of handle elements, together.

8. The kit as in claim 7, wherein said trigger is in the form of an elongated block.

9. The kit as in claim 7, wherein said trigger, said plurality of barrel elements and said plurality of handle elements are in the form of wood blocks.

10. The kit as in claim 9, further comprising at least one post.

11. The kit as in claim 10, wherein said at least one post is insertable into said trigger.

12. The kit as in claim 10, wherein said at least one post is insertable into said handle.

13. The kit as in claim 10, further comprising at least one rubber band.

14. A process for assembling a toy gun comprising: a) coupling a plurality of elongated blocks together to form at least one handle; b) coupling a plurality of elongated blocks together to form at least one barrel; and c) slidably inserting at least one trigger into a hole in the gun.

15. The process as in claim 14, wherein said step of assembling said at least one handle and said step of assembling said at least on barrel includes using glue to assemble these elements together.

16. The process as in claim 14, further comprising inserting at least one post into said trigger.

17. The process as in claim 16, further comprising inserting at least one post into said barrel.

18. The process as in claim 17, further comprising coupling at least rubber band to said post coupled to said barrel.

19. The process as in claim 18, further comprising inserting said trigger into a region between said handle and said barrel.

20. The process as in claim 19, further comprising coupling at least one rubber band around said barrel.

21. A process for teaching children about gun safety comprising the steps of: a) assembling a barrel from a plurality of blocks and then instructing the user of the significance of the barrel; b) assembling the handle from a plurality of blocks and then instructing the user of the significance of the handle; c) coupling the handle to the barrel and then instructing the user on general gun safety; d) inserting the trigger into the gun and then instructing the user of the significance of the trigger; e) loading the gun and then instructing the user of the role of ammunition.

22. The process as in claim 21, wherein said step of assembling the barrel includes teaching a user to never assume that a gun is not loaded.

23. The process as in claim 21, wherein the step of assembling the handle includes teaching a user to secure a gun.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application hereby claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application Titled “Gun Safety Teaching Method” by the same inventor and filed on Oct. 31, 2005, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

The invention relates to a kit for making a toy gun, which can include a gun safety teaching method, a method for assembling a toy gun.

SUMMARY

The invention can relate to a toy gun comprising a trigger, a barrel and a handle. The toy gun can be used for teaching gun safety and for firing elastic projectiles such as rubber bands. The barrel can comprise an inner barrel section, and an outer barrel section. The handle can be coupled to the barrel on the outer barrel section. There can also be a post coupled to the trigger, wherein the trigger is movable in a trigger slot formed between the barrel and the handle. The trigger can be spring loaded using an elastic element coupled to the handle. This elastic element can be used for interacting with the post in the trigger, to drive the trigger back into its resting position.

There can be at least one additional post coupled to said the handle wherein the rubber band is coupled to this post.

This handle can include a first block having a hole, a plurality of bottom handle blocks, a plurality of outer blocks, and a plurality of inner cover blocks, wherein the bottom handle blocks, the plurality of outer blocks and the inner cover blocks are all coupled to the first block.

The barrel can include a plurality of barrel side pieces, a front barrel piece and a stock, wherein the barrel side pieces are coupled to the front barrel piece and the stock to form the barrel.

This gun can be formed from a kit for making a gun. This kit can include a set of unassembled components including a trigger, a plurality of barrel elements in the form of a elongated blocks, a plurality of handle elements in the form of elongated blocks. The kit can also include a set of instructions for putting the plurality of barrel elements, and the plurality of handle elements, together. In this case, the trigger, the plurality of barrel elements and the plurality of handle elements can be in the form of wood blocks. The kit can also include at least one post that is insertable into the trigger. There can also be another post that is insertable into either a barrel or a handle. The kit can also include elastomeric elements in the form of rubber bands.

Inside the kit can be a set of instructions which can include a process for assembling a toy gun.

This process can include a step of coupling a plurality of elongated blocks together to form at least one handle

Another step can include coupling another set of blocks together to form at least one barrel. Another step can include slidably inserting at least one trigger into a hole in the gun.

For this assembly process, a user can use glue to assemble these pieces together. The user can then insert at least one post into the trigger. The user can also insert at least one post into the barrel. The user can then couple the rubber band to the post on the barrel. Next, the user can insert the trigger into a region between said handle and the barrel.

This process for instructing an individual on assembling a gun can also include a process for teaching a person about gun safety. This process can include the steps of assembling a barrel from a plurality of blocks and then instructing the user of the significance of the barrel. The next step can include assembling the handle from a plurality of blocks and then instructing the user of the significance of the handle. The next step can include inserting the trigger into the gun and then instructing the user of the significance of the trigger. Another step can include loading the gun and then instructing the user of the role of ammunition.

With the assembly of this relatively harmless toy gun a user can learn gun safety while enjoying the time spent with handicrafts as well.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other objects and features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which disclose at least one embodiment of the present invention. It should be understood, however, that the drawings are designed for the purpose of illustration only and not as a definition of the limits of the invention.

In the drawings, wherein similar reference characters denote similar elements throughout the several views:

FIG. 1A is a side view of the toy gun;

FIG. 1B is a back view of the toy gun;

FIG. 1C is a side perspective view of the toy gun;

FIG. 2A is a flow chart for the assembly of the gun;

FIG. 2B is a flow chart for the alternative method for assembling the gun;

FIG. 3 is a flow chart for assembling the barrel;

FIG. 4 is a flow chart for assembling the handle;

FIG. 5A is a flow chart of the first stage of assembling the trigger;

FIG. 5B is a flow chart for the second stage for assembling the trigger;

FIG. 5C is a flow chart for arming the gun;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the first assembly stage of the barrel;

FIG. 7 is the next assembly stage of the barrel;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the barrel;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the assembled barrel and the trigger;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the first assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the handle

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the next assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the final assembly stage of the handle;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view showing the barrel being coupled to the handle;

FIG. 18 is a perspective close up view of the barrel which is coupled to the handle;

FIG. 19A is a perspective view of a first step of the trigger being coupled to the handle;

FIG. 19B is a perspective view of a second step of the trigger being coupled to the handle;

FIG. 20 is a flow chart showing the process for teaching an individual about gun safety; and

FIG. 21 is a simplified flow chart teaching the process for teaching an individual about gun safety.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring in detail to the drawings, FIGS. 1A, 1B, and 1C show three different views of an assembled toy gun. FIG. 1D shows a kit which can be used to assemble the gun as well. This assembled toy gun includes a plurality of different pieces which can be put together to form three main parts of the gun, the barrel, the trigger and the handle.

The barrel 11 is formed from a plurality of different elements including two barrel side pieces 12a and 12b, a stock piece 15, and a front barrel piece 17. Barrel 11 is designed to receive and target ammunition which can be in the form of a rubber band 90.

Barrel side pieces 12a and 12b are formed substantially identical to each other and are in the form of blocks that are in the form of elongated blocks that are substantially rectangular in cross section. Stock 15 is coupled to barrel side pieces 12a and 12b and is formed wider than the remaining barrel elements 12a and 12b. Stock 15 is shown in greater detail in FIG. 6 wherein stock 15 is formed as a flat block having an angled end forming a block having a trapezoidal cross-section. Stock 15 also has a hole 15a for receiving a band post 19. Front barrel section 17 fits between barrel side pieces 12a and 12b and is also disposed adjacent to stock 15.

There are also two rear barrel sections 20a and 20b wherein these rear barrel sections are formed as blocks which can have a substantially rectangular cross-section. These elements 20a and 20b are coupled to outer surfaces of barrel sections 12a and 12b to act as spacers for rubber band 90.

Trigger section 40 includes a trigger 42 and a trigger wedge 44. Trigger 42 is in the form of an elongated block having a flat first end 42a and an angled opposite end 42b.

First end 42a of trigger 40 forms the finger contact point for a user. In most cases, a user would use his or her index finger to press on first end 42a. Opposite or second end 42b is used as a band contact point. This angled end is designed to accommodate band 14 as it extends across a back end of the gun.

Trigger wedge 44 is in the form of a triangular shaped block 44 which can be coupled to stock 14. Trigger wedge 44 can also be used for an inside handle section 50.

Handle section 50 is in the form of multiple blocks which can be coupled together. First block 52 is in the form of a main block section that is trapezoidal in shape having two substantially parallel sides and two opposite ends that are not parallel to each other. There are also a plurality of outer blocks which 54a, 54b, 54c, and 54d which can form front and back blocks on both sides of first block 52.

Additional bottom handle blocks 56a and 56b are coupled to a bottom section of main handle block 52 below outer blocks 54a, 54b, 54c, and 54d to form a butt of the gun.

There are also inner cover blocks 58a and 58b which can be coupled to first or base block 52. Inner cover blocks 58a and 58b are shaped so that they can be coupled to main block 52 while still providing an area for a trigger to slide.

This device which can be formed into a gun can be made from a plurality of different pieces which can be of any known material but can, for example be made from wood, plastic, metal or any other known material.

In one embodiment the gun can be in the form of a wood based gun wherein the pieces for assembly are made from wood. The materials necessary for this process are the pieces of the gun as described above and ordinary wood glue.

FIG. 2A is a flow chart showing the basic process for assembling the gun while FIG. 2B is the flow chart showing an alternative basic process for assembling the gun. The basic process starts with step 10 which includes assembling the barrel. This step is shown in greater detail in FIG. 3. The next step 20 involves assembling the handle. This step is shown in greater detail in FIG. 4. Step 30 involves coupling the barrel to the handle and then coupling the first rubber band to the gun. This step is shown in greater detail in FIG. 5A. Step 40 involves assembling and inserting the trigger and is shown in greater detail in FIG. 5B, while step 50 involves loading the gun which is shown in greater detail in FIG. 5C. Alternatively, FIG. 2B shows steps 100, 110, 120, 130 and 140, which differ from steps 10-50 in that the handle is assembled before the barrel.

Turning to FIG. 3, which outlines the steps for assembling the barrel, step 11 involves coupling a first barrel side piece 12a , with a front barrel piece 17 as shown in FIG. 6. Front barrel piece 17 has a first end 17a and a second end 17b. Two or three drops of glue can be used to couple these two parts together. The first step as shown in FIG. 6 is to place the two parts together with two ends being even, such that first end 17a is positioned even with an end of first barrel side piece 12a.

In the next step 12, as shown in FIG. 7 the stock 15 can be coupled to this first side piece 12a. The first end 15b of stock 15 is positioned adjacent to a second or back end 17b of front barrel piece 17. The second end 15c of stock 15 is slanted and is designed to allow a trigger to extend there-through. These two pieces can be coupled to each other via glue. When these two pieces are put together, the glue is then wiped away. A top end 15c is placed flush with a top end of barrel side piece 12a.

Next, in step 13, as shown in FIG. 7 the user can “lubricate” the back end 15c of the stock by using a pencil having a graphite tip. At this point, a user can simply press and rub the graphite tip of the pencil on back end 15c to lubricate this angled end.

In step 14, as shown in FIG. 8 the opposite side barrel piece 12b can be joined to the remaining portion of the barrel. The user can place glue on an inside face of side barrel piece 12b and then press these two parts together to join them so that the outer edges of each barrel piece 12a and 12b are flush against each other. Once this opposite side barrel piece 12b has been coupled to the remaining part of the barrel, the user should check to see if trigger 42 slides within a slot formed between first barrel piece 12a and second barrel piece 12b (See FIG. 9). If the trigger does not fall within the slot, the user should use an emery board to file down the opening for the slide of the trigger.

Next, in step 15, the user can join the two barrel rear sections 20a and 20b to the back end of the barrel 20 as shown in FIG. 9. The user should make sure that these barrel rear sections 20a and 20b are flush against a back end of the two barrel pieces 12a and 12b. Again, after the coupling of these two elements together, the user should use an emery board to check that the trigger slides between these two sections as shown in FIG. 9. If the trigger does not slide properly, the user should use an emery board to file this down to widen the opening.

Simultaneously, or either before or after the assembly of the barrel, the user can assemble the handle or grip. For example, in step 21, as shown in FIG. 10, the user should take the base or first block 52 and couple its bottom end 52a with bottom handle blocks 56a and 56b. The user should review to make sure that bottom handle blocks 56a and 56b are flush with the bottom edge of bottom end 52a. During this step, the user should also write on the opposite end 52b of first block 52 with a pencil to apply a graphite lubricant to top or opposite end 52b as shown in FIG. 11.

Next in step 22, the user couples two of the outer blocks 54a and 54b to the first block 52 as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. While the glue is still wet, the user can place this handle section on a table or flat surface to align the parts with the edges.

Next in step 23 as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15 the user cap apply or couple inner cover blocks 58a and 58b to first block 52. Inner cover blocks 58a and 58b are in the shape of a trapezoid with one elongated side and an opposite shorter side. These inner cover blocks should be coupled to first block 52 so that a hole 52d in first block 52, remains exposed.

Next, in step 24, as shown in FIG. 16 the user glues or couples the remaining outer blocks 54c and 54d to main block 52 to complete the construction of the handle grip.

In step 30 the barrel can be coupled to the handle such that when this occurs the user can also couple the first rod 19 and elastic element or rubber band 80 to the gun as well. For example, in step 31, as shown in FIGS. 17 and 18 the user can then couple the handle to the barrel of the gun. At this stage, it is important to test and to confirm the positioning of the barrel with the handle. Before applying any glue, the user can slide the handle along the bottom edge of the barrel so that the handle lines up with the front edge of the barrel rear sections 20a and 20b. At this point, the user should check to see if the trigger will slide through the opening created by this connection. If the opening for the trigger is too large, then the user can file down the connection ends of the handle to narrow the gap. At this point, once the trigger fits in a proper sliding movement, the user can then glue the barrel to the handle.

In step 32 the user can insert a band post 19 into hole 15a in stock 15 (See FIG. 19A). Once the band post has dried, the user can then take a size 32 rubber band 80 and insert it through the hole 52a in first block 52. A user can use a tooth pick to insert this rubber band into hole 52d. At this point, the trigger should slide easily within the handle. If it doesn't then a user can use an emery board to smooth out the lining of the passage.

In step 41, as shown in FIG. 19A the user can lubricate a trigger block or element 44 in the form of a triangle wedge by writing on a first surface 44a of trigger element 44 wherein this first surface is for receiving the trigger. Next, the user can apply glue to the long back side 44b of wedge 44 so that it can be applied to the barrel section. Before applying wedge 44 to the barrel section, in step 43, trigger 42 should already be placed inside the gun as described in step 42.

In step 43, as shown in FIG. 19B, the user can then insert an additional band post 21 into trigger 42 by inserting it into trigger hole 42c. Before gluing band post 21 into trigger 42 the user should test to see how the trigger slides inside its trigger slot. The trigger should be positioned so that band post 21 is disposed between the two strands 80a and 80b of the rubber band 80. At this point, with post 21 disposed inside of trigger 42, the user should check to see if trigger 42 slides efficiently within this trigger slot. If the trigger slides effectively, then the user can glue post 21 to trigger 42. If the trigger does not slide effectively, then the user can remove trigger 42 and continue to sand the trigger and the trigger slot using an emery board to make sure that the trigger slides efficiently. Once this has been accomplished, in step 44, the user can insert post or rod 21 into trigger 42 and glue it therein and then insert trigger 42 into the trigger slot. In step 45, the user can then move or wrap rubber band ends 80a and 80b around trigger post 21 so that trigger post 21 can oscillate between these to band ends.

In step 50 a user can then load the gun. For example, the user can take a rubber band 80 and apply it to the gun barrel so that it stretches from a front end of the barrel to a back end of the barrel as shown in FIG. 1A. In step 51, the user can place rubber band 90 over the front end of the barrel. Next, in step 52, the user can widen the rubber band over the barrel. In step 53, the user can place the back of the rubber band over the back end of the gun. Finally, in step 54, the user can pull the trigger 42 on the gun, driving trigger 42 up through the gun to press rubber band 90 up away from the back end of the barrel so that the rubber band 90 snaps forward to fire.

Simultaneous with the instructions on assembly, and the process for building the gun, the user can also learn about gun safety. For example, as shown in FIG. 20, in step 201, when a user assembles a barrel, the instructions can also teach the user about the significance of the barrel in relation to the rest of the gun. This teaching can include teaching the user about the significance of a loaded gun. In particular, the instructions teach the user about the importance of never assuming that the gun is not loaded. Next, in step 202, when the user is building the handle, the instructions can also teach the user about the significance of the handle in relation to the rest of the gun. During this step, the instructions can teach the user about the importance of securing a gun such as in a locked box or in a holster. In addition, the instructions can also teach the user about how to recognize an unsecured gun. In step 203 the user can then couple the handle to the barrel of the gun, while the instructions teach about the importance of gun safety. In step 204, the user can insert and couple the trigger into the gun, while the instructions teach about the significance of the trigger with relation to the gun and gun safety. Finally, step 205 can include loading the gun while teaching the user about the importance of gun safety with respect to a loaded gun.

FIG. 21 shows a simplified version of the process as shown in FIG. 20 wherein in step 301 the user can assemble the gun. In step 302 the instructions can teach about gun safety simultaneously with the assembly of the gun. Finally in step 303, the user can fire the gun.

Accordingly, while at least one embodiment of the present invention has been shown and described, it is to be understood that many changes and modifications may be made thereunto without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.





 
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