Title:
Projectile containing a gel impregnated with an abrasive agent
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A projectile to be fired by a projectile firing device, said projectile comprising a hollow elongate body containing a gel, said body adapted to rupture upon impact with a target and having at least one weakened area to assist in the controlled rupture of said body to release said gel, and wherein said gel is impregnated with an abrasive agent.



Inventors:
Webb, Roger Clyde (George Town, AU)
Application Number:
10/570426
Publication Date:
04/12/2007
Filing Date:
09/01/2004
Assignee:
Poly Systems Pty Ltd. (George Town, AU)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
86/50, 102/512, 102/513
International Classes:
F42B33/00; F42B8/14; F42B12/22; F42B12/46; F42B12/74; F42D5/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BERGIN, JAMES S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Walter | Haverfield LLP (CLEVELAND, OH, US)
Claims:
1. A projectile to be fired by a projectile firing device, said projectile comprising a hollow elongate body containing a gel, said body being rupturable upon impact with a target and having at least one weakened area to assist in the controlled rupture of said body to release said gel, and wherein said gel is impregnated with an abrasive agent.

2. The projectile according to claim 1, wherein said projectile is for disarms an explosive device.

3. The projectile as according to claim 1, wherin said abrasive agent comprises at least one material selected from the group consisting of glass, metal, silicone, bentonite, polymer and ceramic.

4. The projectile according to claim 1, wherein said body is substantially cylindrical.

5. The projectile according to claim 1, wherein said at least one weakened area is an elongate strip portion extending longitudinally.

6. The projectile in according to claim 5, wherein said at least one weakened area is a plurality of elongate strip portions extending longitudinally spaced apart from each other.

7. The projectile according to claim 1, wherein said projectile includes a fore end and comprises an impact nose at said fore end.

8. The projectile according to claim 1, further comprising a shotgun cartridge for housing said projectile, said shotgun cartridge having an aft end, and wherein said projectile is fired from a shotgun.

9. The projectile in according to claim 8, wherein said projectile further comprises a fast burning powder propellant and a primer cap at the aft end of said shotgun cartridge, and wherein a wad is disposed between said body and said fast burning powder propellant.

10. The projectile in according to claim 9 wherein said gel is impregnated with a heavy earth compound.

11. The projectile in according to claim 1, wherein said projectile has a central core made of metal.

12. The projectile according to claim 1, wherein said projectile is a breech/entry projectile.

13. A projectile to be fired by a projectile firing device, said projectile comprising a hollow elongate body containing a gel, said body being rupturable upon impact with a target and having at least one weakened area to assist in the controlled rupture of said body to release said gel, and wherein said gel is impregnated with a clay.

14. The projectile in according to claim 13, wherein said clay is bentonite.

15. The projectile according to claim 13, wherin said gel is impregnated with at least one material selected from the group consisting of glass, metal, silicone, polymer and ceramic.

16. The projectile according to claim 13, wherein said projectile disarms an explosive device.

17. The projectile according to claim 13, wherein said body is substantially cylindrical.

18. The projectile according to claim 13, wherein said at least one weakened area is an elongate strip portion extending longitudinally.

19. The projectile according to claim 18, wherein said at least one weakened area is a plurality of elongate strip portions extending longitudinally spaced apart from each other.

20. The projectile as claimed in according to claim 13, wherein said projectile includes a fore end and comprises an impact nose at said fore end.

21. The projectile as claimed in according to claim 13, further comprising a shotgun cartridge for housing said projectile said shotgun cartridge having an aft end, and wherein said projectile is fired from a shotgun.

22. The projectile according to claim 21, wherein said projectile further comprises a fast burning powder propellant and a primer cap at the aft end of said shotgun cartridge, and wherein a wad is disposed between said body and said fast burning powder propellant.

23. The projectile according to claim 22, wherein said projectile is a non-lethal projectile.

24. The projectile according to claim 23, wherein said gel is a food grade gel.

25. The projectile according to claim 24, wherein said gel is impregnated with a food grade dye.

26. The projectile according to claim 25, wherein said gel is impregnated with a heavy earth compound.

27. The projectile according to claim 21, wherein said projectile has a central core made of metal.

28. The projectile according to claim 13, wherein said projectile is a breech/entry projectile.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a National Stage application of International Application No. PCT/AU2004/001182, filed on Sep. 1, 2004, which claims priority of Australian application number 2003904789, filed on Sep. 2, 2003 and Australian application number 2003906402, filed on Nov. 19, 2003.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a projectile for a projectile firing device. More particularly, the present invention relates to a projectile for a projectile firing device that comprises a gel substance. In specific embodiments the projectile of the present invention may be used to disarm an explosive device when fired from a disarming device or as a projectile to be fired by a shotgun.

BACKGROUND

A common prior art device to disrupt and/or disarm an explosive device in urban locations, is a “remotely activated kinetic energy device” or RAKED, which itself utilizes an explosive charge to fire a body of water or “water projectile” at an explosive device.

This known RAKED suffers from a number of disadvantages. Firstly, where an explosive device is placed into a soft vinyl layered bag or leather briefcase, the water projectile from the RAKED cannot enter through these materials, and the material absorbs the impact. This may result in a non-controlled explosive detonation. A second disadvantage is that the RAKED must be fired in very close proximity, typically 100-150 mm, to the suspect explosive device, placing the operator in significant danger. A third disadvantage is that a water-based projectile is destructive and grossly inaccurate.

Another type of device to disrupt and/or disarm an explosive device is disclosed in International patent publication No. WO 2004/00538 entitled“Device for disarming explosive” that fires a projectile by use of a propellant liquid that undergoes a phase change to a highly) dense gas to provide the explosive firing charge. The projectile used in this device contains a gel impregnated with an abrasive agent and overcomes many of the disadvantages of the earlier mentioned RAKED.

The present invention relates to a projectile that can be used in either of the abovementioned devices. The projectile of the present invention also has other applications such as a non-lethal or lethal projectile that can be fired from a shotgun.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to a first aspect, the present invention comprises a projectile to be fired by a projectile firing device, said projectile comprising a hollow elongate body containing a gel, said body adapted to rupture upon impact with a target and having at least one weakened area to assist in the controlled rupture of said body to release said gel, and wherein said gel is impregnated with an abrasive agent.

Preferably said projectile is for disarming an explosive device.

Preferably said abrasive agent comprises any one or more of glass, metal, silicone, bentonite, polymer or ceramic.

Preferably said body is substantially cylindrical.

Preferably said at least one weakened area is an elongate strip portion extending longitudinally.

Preferably said at least one weakened area is a plurality of elongate strip portions extending longitudinally spaced apart from each other.

Preferably said projectile has an impact nose at its fore end.

In one embodiment said projectile is housed within a shotgun cartridge and is adapted to be fired from a shotgun. Preferably said projectile has a fast burning powder propellant and a primer cap at the aft end of said shotgun cartridge, and a wad is disposed between said body and said fast burning powder propellent.

Preferably said gel is impregnated with a heavy earth compound.

In another embodiment said projectile has a central core made of metal. Preferably said projectile is a breech/entry projectile.

According to a second aspect, the present invention comprises a projectile to be fired by a projectile firing device, said projectile comprising a hollow elongate body containing a gel, said body adapted to rupture upon impact with a target and having at least one weakened area to assist in the controlled rupture of said body to release said gel, and wherein said gel is impregnated with a clay.

Preferably said clay is bentonite.

Preferably said gel is impregnated with any one or more of glass, metal, silicone, polymer, or ceramic.

The projectile of the present invention is for disarming an explosive device.

Preferably said body is substantially cylindrical.

Preferably said at least one weakened area is an elongate strip portion extending longitudinally.

Preferably said at least one weakened area is a plurality of elongate strip portions extending longitudinally spaced apart from each other.

Preferably said projectile has an impact nose at its fore end.

Preferably said projectile is housed within a shotgun cartridge and is adapted to be fired from a shotgun. Preferably said projectile has a fast burning powder propellant and a primer cap at the aft end of said shotgun cartridge, and a wad is disposed between said body and said fast burning powder propellant.

In one embodiment said projectile is a non-lethal projectile.

Preferably said gel is a food grade gel. Preferably said gel is impregnated with a food grade dye.

Preferably said gel is impregnated with a heavy earth compound.

Preferably in another embodiment said projectile has a central core made of metal.

Preferably said projectile is a breech/entry projectile

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will now be described with reference to drawings in which: FIG. 1 is a schematic elevation view of a projectile for disarming an explosive device in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view through 1 t-II of the projectile shown in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3 (a)-(b) depict the projectile of FIG. 1 just before and as it makes initial contact with the outer wall of an explosive device.

FIG. 4 depicts the projectile of FIG. 3 when it is in full contact with the explosive device.

FIG. 5 depicts a schematic elevation view of a non-lethal projectile to be fired from a shotgun in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is the projectile of FIG. 5 without the shotgun cartridge.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view through VU-VIT of the body shown in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 (a)-(c) depicts firing of the projectile shown in FIG. 5 in three stages.

FIG. 9 depicts a schematic elevation view of a projectile for breech/entry of a door or lock in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is the projectile of FIG. 9 without the shotgun cartridge.

FIG. 11 is a cross sectional view through X-X of the body shown in FIG. 10.

BEST MODE OF CARRYING OUT INVENTION

FIGS. 1-4 depict a projectile 1 for disarming an explosive device in a first embodiment of the present invention. The projectile 1 is adapted to be fired by a disarming device known as a“remotely activated kinetic energy device” or RAKED (not shown) having a parallel bore and nose.

Projectile 1 comprises an elongate hollow cylindrical body 2 inside which is housed an inert highly dense gel 3. The body 2, which is made of plastic, has six elongate (strip) weakened areas 4 spaced apart from each other about the outer surface of the body 2 and extend axially parallel to the longitudinal axis L of projectile 1.

Projectile 1 has a domed impact nose 5 at its fore end to assist passage of air-flow around projectile 1 when it is in flight, and to also assist in a gradual entry through an impacted material. Projectile 1 also has a rubber O-ring 9 located at the fore end of projectile 1 near the impact nose 5. The rubber O-ring 9 ensures that projectile 1 remains firmly in the bore of the RAKED when being handled or conveyed. In use, projectile 1 can be fired from a RAKED (not shown) towards an explosive device.

FIGS. 3 (a)-(b) depict projectile 1 as (a) just before and (b) as it impacts the steel outer wall 7 of an explosive device. Initially the tip of impact nose 5 begins to fail as it impacts the outer wall 7, and provides a cutting edge that pierces the outer wall 7. Also at this time, the weight at the rear of the projectile 1 has put excess load on body 2 thereby causing the center of projectile 1 to bulge. Once the impact nose 5 has ruptured the gel 3 begins to move forward towards the primary target 8 of the explosive device, which may for instance be a battery, an IC chipboard, etc. As shown in FIG. 4, the sidewall of body 2 has ruptured (or failed). This allows the highly dense gel 3 to exit through the body 2 and move forward and spreading outwards thereby imparting its kinetic energy with primary target 8.

Preferably the highly inert gel 3 is impregnated with an abrasive agent such as any one or more of glass, metal, silicone, bentonite, polymer or ceramic.

A RAKED is able to deliver the inert projectile 1 at a high velocity from a greater distance than is achievable with prior art RAKED projectiles. The projectile 1 also provides a strategic impact area thus reducing the overall damage, thus allowing a higher percentage of forensic evidence to be obtained after the explosive device 8 has been made safe. The projectile 1, is also capable of penetrating a wide variety of materials, including thin metal sheet, densely woven material and leather.

While the abovementioned embodiment of projectile 1 is described as being suitable for use with a RAKED, it should be understood that in another embodiment the projectile 1 may be used with the device to disrupt and/or disarm an explosive device as disclosed in International patent publication No. WO 2004/00538.

An advantage of the projectile 1, whether fired from a RAKED or the device to disarm and/or disrupt as disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 2004/00538, is that it can be fired with effect at an explosive device at an) range of up to about 20 metres. However, it is envisaged that projectile 1 will typically be fired from a range of 2-10 metres. This is an advantage over the prior art projectiles fired from disarming devices, in that it significantly reduces the danger risks to operators thereof

Also, while the impact nose 5 assists in the gradual entry through an impacted material, the projectile 1 also is effective in penetrating an impacted material if the projectile has spun, and impacted the material on its broad side.

FIGS. 5-8 depict a non-lethal projectile that is fired from a shotgun in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention. Like that of the earlier embodiment projectile 101 comprises an elongate hollow cylindrical body 102 made of plastic, containing a gel 103. Body 102 has a plug 112 at its aft end. Also like that of the earlier embodiment, the body 102 comprises six weakened areas 104 which are spaced apart from each other about the outer surface of the body 102. However, in this embodiment the body 102 is housed within a conventional plastic shotgun cartridge 106 having a magnum primer cap 107 that is intended to ignite a fast burning propellant powder 110.

In a typical arrangement the load weight of the propellant powder 110 is about 10 grains.

A wad 108 is disposed between propellant 110 and body 102. To ensure efficient burn of propellant powder 110 and to provide a suitable time delay, a friction rolled cartridge end 111 is incorporated. This means of packing provides a time delay and higher pressure build-up behind the projectile.

Body 102 is preferably about 36 mm long and about 18 mm in diameter with 0.5 mm wall thickness. Each of the six weakened areas 104 is about 24 mm long, 2.5 mm wide and about 0.2 mm thick. The plug 112 extends rearwardly from body 102 about 4 mm.

In use, projectile 101 (see FIG. 8 (a) ) is loaded in a standard 12 bore pump-action (non-choked) shotgun and fired in a conventional manner. As the body 102 containing gel 103 exits cartridge 106 it is put into flight (see FIG. 8 (b)) and the body 102 upon impacting a target is able to collapse as a result of the weakened areas 104 and spread its dense contents over a large impact area, thus dissipating the impact load (see FIG. 8 (c) ). As the projectile body 102 collapses and its side walls rupture (or fail) it allows for the heavy gel compound to move in a forward direction and spread outwardly from the immediate impact area

Preferably gel 103 is manufactured from food grade materials and different additives such as food grade dye and heavy earth substances may be added to gel 103 to suit different purposes. The heavy earth substances give projectile 101 the specific weight required for effectiveness. Also, other substances such as those used in capsicum spray and the like may be incorporated within gel 103. It should also be understood that while other such non-lethal or non harmful substances may also be included, in other not described embodiments harmful substances may be included in the projectile 101.

Projectiles 101 are preferably intended for an operational parameter from 1 meter to 55 meters. However, this operational parameter can be extended to suit demand by altering the abovementioned embodiment. To ensure non-lethality, these projectiles are designed to collapse and spread their contents over a large area to dissipate the impact load.

FIGS. 9-11 depict a third embodiment of the present invention that can be used as a “breech/entry” projectile to be fired at doors and locks for entry) into dwellings and vehicles. Like that of the second embodiment, projectile 201 comprises an elongate hollow cylindrical body 202 made of plastic, containing a gel 203. Body 202 has a plug 212 at its aft. Also like that of the second embodiment, the body 202 has six weakened areas 204 which are spaced apart from each other about the outer surface of the body 202.

Also like that of the second embodiment, the body 202 is housed within a conventional plastic shotgun cartridge 206 having a magnum primer cap 207 that is intended to ignite a fast burning propellant powder 210. In a typical arrangement, the load weight of the propellant powder is about 25 grains. A wad 208 is disposed between propellant powder 210 and body 202. Also like that of the second embodiment, a friction rolled cartridge end 211 is provided to ensure efficient burn of propellant powder 210 and a time delay.

However, this third embodiment is also provided with a stainless steel central core 215, that is adapted to breech the lock or door, upon firing of the projectile 201. It should be understood that in other not shown embodiments the central core 215, may be made of some other metal or hard substance.

While the abovementioned first embodiment of projectile 1 may contain bentonite, a type of clay, it should be understood that it may also be added to the other embodiments of projectiles 101 and 201. The amount of bentonite within the gel may vary depending on whether the intended use is projectile 1 (disarmer/disrupter), projectile 101 (non-lethal) or projectile 201 (breech/entry). The bentonite in the above referenced embodiments may also be mixed with, or substituted by, other clays or clay compounds.

While in all of the abovementioned three embodiments there are six elongate (strip) weakened areas 4,104 and 204 on body 2,102 and 202, respectively, it should be understood that the size, shape, number and overall dimensions of these weakened areas may differ, as well as that of the body in other not shown embodiments. For instance, in another not shown embodiment the weakened areas may be one or more annular rings disposed about the body 2,102 or 202.

Other components of the projectiles 1,101 and 201 may also differ. For instance in an alternative embodiment more than one O-ring 9 on projectile 1, may be used.

It should be understood that in other not shown embodiments the projectiles 1,101 and 201 can be sized and shaped to be fired from different caliber projectile firing devices.

It should also be understood that the non-lethal projectiles 1 and 101 can be used in confined spaces where it is inappropriate or unsafe to use conventional projectiles. One such application is for security use within pressurised aircraft cabins, where projectiles 1 and 101, would not pose a risk to the structural integrity of the aircraft. The non-lethal projectiles 1 and 101, are also suitable for use in training exercises carried out by military and police forces.

All references made to a“disarming device”, throughout the specification, should be understood to refer to a device also known as a“disarmer/disrupter”.

The term“comprising” as used herein is used in the inclusive sense of “including” or “having” and not in the exclusive sense of “consisting only of”.

What has been described above are preferred aspects of the present invention. It is of course not possible to describe every conceivable combination of components or methodologies for purposes of describing the present invention, but one of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that many further combinations and permutations of the present invention are possible. Accordingly, the present invention is intended to embrace all such alterations, combinations, modifications, and variations that fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.