Title:
Cargo-lock systems
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A locking mechanism, designed specifically for cargo vehicles (e.g., cargo trucks) is provided for use with one sliding door, the mechanism comprising of one “control box” and at least one optional, remote electrical operating device. The operating device may be manually operated, e.g., by a truck operator, from outside the cargo vehicle, to unlock the door. In a typical context, the control box comprises a microchip controlled magnetic lock.



Inventors:
Lazarte-lovatoni, Paul F. (Walnut Creek, CA, US)
Harrington, Richard John (Pleasanton, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/238661
Publication Date:
04/05/2007
Filing Date:
09/30/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D55/14
View Patent Images:
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20090241619Latch LockOctober, 2009Kuester et al.
20090241609SASH LOCKING SYSTEMOctober, 2009Laporta
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20090282880KEYED LOCK DOOR HANDLENovember, 2009Baser
20070289342ELECTRONIC RESTRAINT SYSTEMDecember, 2007Brooks et al.
20040011093Curved shackle lockJanuary, 2004Fantl
20080307837Convertible motorized latchDecember, 2008Greiner et al.
20060236732Vibration-protected casement lockOctober, 2006Hoffman



Primary Examiner:
AMAYA, CARLOS DAVID
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PAUL LAZARTE-LOVATONI (WALNUT CREEK, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A locking mechanism designed specifically for cargo vehicles, including cargo trucks, for use with at least one door of a cargo vehicle, the mechanism comprising of one commercial magnetic 3″×10″ product box which is a magnetic device and at least one remote, electrical operating device.

2. A locking mechanism as claimed in claim 1, comprising at least one remote, electrical operating device specifically used for unlocking/locking the control box.

3. A locking mechanism, as claimed in claim 2, comprising a microchip design that includes a timing device to lock or unlock the locking mechanism.

4. A locking mechanism, as claimed in claim 2, which is operated by a remote control device (optional) which may be manually operated, e.g., by a truck operator from outside cargo vehicle, to unlock a truck door.

5. A remote control device, as claimed in claim 3, which unlocks a truck door when truck operator depresses “unlock” button on remote control device.

6. A remote control device, as claimed in claim 3, which locks a truck door when truck operator depresses “lock” button on remote control device.

Description:

This written treatment of the CARGO-LOCK mechanism seeks to elucidate the components, mechanics and operation of this new security system for securing property in cargo vehicles as envisioned and developed by Paul Lazarte-Lovatoni and Richard Harrington, the inventors of the CARGO-LOCK secure system. CARGO-LOCK was designed specifically for use by cargo trucks and other cargo vehicles. This treatment was populated as the abstract required for utility patent application filing for this innovation.

This new mechanism was invented for the first time by Paul Lazarte-Lovatoni and Richard Harrington on Jun. 17, 2005.

This treatment will be presented in the following key section Areas:

  • I. Background & Context
  • II. The Problem of Securing Transported Cargo
  • III. Description of the CARGO-LOCK Technology
  • IV. How the CARGO-LOCK Operates
  • V. CARGO-LOCK Secure System Schematic

Section I: Background & Context

In the cargo truck business, vandalism and theft of property is a rampant problem that is burgeoning as criminals discover that cargo-stored property is literally an easy crime that anyone can get away with.

The most conservative statistics bear out the criticality of this problem. In California, there are over 100,000 cargo trucks that use a key-lock system to secure their storage area. Approximately, twenty-five percent of these trucks experience some level of vandalism/theft. By any analysis of criminal data, such a figure is excessive and critical to business viability, not to mention business survival. Thus, the daily commonplace dilemma of securing stored property is a rampant problem for cargo truck operators. The above-stated theft/vandalism occurs at different levels of causation: key-lock mechanisms are successfully tampered with through the thieves' use of tools (e.g., plyers) that are capable of breaking the lock or “skeleton” keys that can open the lock.

The state of the problem is at a crossroads-level period. In other words, any solution that is more than a plausible approach to this burgeoning business concern of truck owners may be regarded as the latest proverbial “idea whose time has come.”

The inability to fully secure property has serious business implications that may result in loss of dollar revenues, competitive leading-edge status, and other related legal problems including breach of contract—not to mention the ultimate failure of a specific commercial enterprise.

By extension, all of the above concepts/principles concerning the need for truck cargo security also can apply to a specific subsidiary of a company as well as to any individual person who may irregularly operate a cargo truck of any size.

The CARGO-LOCK mechanism also enhances a user's need for time efficiency since without the need to use a key—much less the need to remember to use it—the user can focus on other priorities required in their delivery or storage of the cargoed items.

Section II: The Problem of Securing Transported Cargo

The issue of securing transported cargo is currently of a continuing nature whose solution seems elusive—or appears that way—for any person or entity engaged in transporting cargo via truck or other vehicle. As the FIGS., delineated in section I illustrate, the problem is at a critical level where a solution begs the issue.

So, how does CARGO-LOCK security system make a difference in being an intended solution to this problem? Simply stated, the CARGO-LOCK security system solves the problem by utilizing digital control logic technology to enhance the effectiveness of the locking mechanism.

By designing CARGO-LOCK specifically for cargo vehicles and making lock/unlock access of the locking mechanism limited via use of a remote device, the possibilities of the locking mechanism being accessed by thieves is significantly, if not completely, addressed.

At the present time, no locking mechanism addressing the above problem exists that is specifically designed for cargo vehicles. Thus, corporate entities and individuals are presently at common, regular risk to thieves and/or vandals when they use existing latch or key-lock mechanisms to secure property in cargo vehicles. There are lock mechanisms based on digital control logic technology that exist. However, none of these locking mechanisms are designed specifically for cargo vehicles.

The CARGO-LOCK mechanism also enhances a user's need for time efficiency since without the need to use a key—much less the need to remember to use it—the user can focus on other priorities required in their delivery or storage of the cargoed items.

Section III: Description of the CARGO-LOCK Technology

The technology described herein has been denominated as the CARGO-LOCK by its innovators. This system comprises a two-part locking mechanism [See Section V schematic] and a genie remote locking/unlocking mechanism [See Section V schematic].

This technology involves a solution that is an extension of a scientific development often referred to as digital control logic technology. This technology, innovated in

The CARGO-LOCK secure system are comprised of the following components:

  • (1) Control Box
  • (2) Remote Control Device (Optional)

Section IV: How the CARGO-LOCK Operates

Sequentially, the CARGO-LOCK generally operates as follows:

  • (1) User chooses to unlock cargo door that is presently locked via a magnetic field that is in lock position. Using a remote control device, he presses the unlock icon on the device which sends electronic pulse (contact closure) that runs the motor mechanism in the CARGO-LOCK control box component and unlocks the motor for a short time.
  • (2) The signal is then sent to the locking mechanism.
  • (3) At the exact second that the locking mechanism receives the signal from the genie, the locking mechanism is opened. Consequently, the lock is placed in the unlock position.
  • (4) The above sequence repeats when user chooses to lock the cargo door except the lock icon is pressed and the electronic pulse sends a lock signal on the remote is pressed. Consequently, the lock is placed in the lock position.

By making the locking mechanism accessible exclusively through the CARGO-LOCK remote device, as opposed to a key or a latch located on the locking mechanism as is the case with most other cargo locks, the CARGO-LOCK secure system better ensures the protections/safekeeping of property in the truck cargo storage area.

Relative to the truck operator's purchase of the CARGO-LOCK system, more than one CARGO-LOCK genie can be provided to be used by employees according to the truck operator determination of who should have access to the stored cargo.

Section V: CARGO-LOCK Operation Schematic