Title:
Gunstock having laser sighting device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A gunstock assembly includes a laser sighting device, and a gunstock having a cavity containing the laser sighting device. In one exemplary embodiment, a portion of the laser sighting device extends outside the cavity at a fore end of the gunstock. In another exemplary embodiment, a laser output port of the laser sighting device is substantially flush with a fore end of the gunstock. In yet another exemplary embodiment, a laser output port of the laser sighting device is recessed from a fore end of the gunstock within the cavity. The laser sighting device can also include an actuator switch that, when actuated, causes the laser sighting device to emit a laser beam.



Inventors:
Richeson, Leland Jay (Dayton, OR, US)
Application Number:
11/321573
Publication Date:
04/05/2007
Filing Date:
12/28/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
42/146, 42/71.01
International Classes:
F41G1/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
HAYES, BRET C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JOSEPH P. CURTIN (Hillsboro, OR, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A gunstock assembly, comprising: a laser sighting device; and a gunstock having a cavity containing the laser sighting device.

2. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein a portion of the laser sighting device extends outside the cavity of a fore end of the gunstock.

3. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein a laser output port of the laser sighting device is substantially flush with a fore end of the gunstock.

4. The gunstock assembly according to claim 3, wherein the laser sighting device includes at least one of an elevation adjustment and a windage adjustment, and wherein the gunstock includes an access hole for each adjustment.

5. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein a laser output port of the laser sighting device is recessed from a fore end of the gunstock within the cavity.

6. The gunstock assembly according to claim 5, wherein the laser sighting device includes at least one of an elevation adjustment and a windage adjustment, and wherein the gunstock includes an access hole for each adjustment.

7. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein the laser sighting device includes an actuator switch that, when actuated, causes the laser sighting device to emit a laser beam.

8. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein the gunstock is a unitary-body gunstock.

9. The gunstock assembly according to claim 1, wherein the gunstock is formed by at least two mating pieces.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATION

The present patent application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application 60/723,607, invented by Leland J. Richeson, filed Oct. 5, 2005, and incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

The subject matter disclosed herein relates to firearms. More particularly, the subject matter disclosed herein relates to a gunstock for a firearm.

Laser sighting devices for firearms are well known. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,026,054, 4,161,076 and 4,295,289 each to Snyder disclose laser aiming devices that attached to firearms. U.S. Pat. No. 4,244,131 to Kaelin discloses an aiming device that attaches to a firearm that includes a laser device that emits a laser beam in the direction of the muzzle of the firearm. U.S. Pat. No. 4,313,273 to Matthews et al. discloses a laser beam aim assisting system that attaches to a firearm that is selectably activatable for providing an aiming mark on a target of the firearm.

Additionally, LaserLyte, L.L.C. provides a number of lasersights that attach to a firearm and provide a cord to an actuator switch that also attaches to the firearm. The LaserLyte, L.L.C. lasersights mount externally to the gunstock or barrel of a firearm, as does the actuator switch and the cord. One drawback with such an exposed configuration is that the cord is easily caught on branches or other objects when, for example, a hunter is moving through underbrush.

What is needed, among other things, is a laser sighting system for a firearm that is convenient to use and does not have an exposed configuration.

BRIEF SUMMARY

The subject matter disclosed herein provides, among other things, a laser sighting system for a firearm that is convenient to use and does not have an exposed configuration.

The advantages of the subject matter disclosed herein are provided by a gunstock assembly that includes a laser sighting device, and a gunstock having a cavity containing the laser sighting device. The gunstock can be a unitary-body gunstock or a gunstock that is formed by at least two mating pieces. In one exemplary embodiment, a portion of the laser sighting device extends outside the cavity at a fore end of the gunstock. In another exemplary embodiment, a laser output port of the laser sighting device is substantially flush with a fore end of the gunstock. For such an exemplary embodiment, the laser sighting device includes at least one of an elevation adjustment and a windage adjustment, and the gunstock includes an access hole for each adjustment. In yet another exemplary embodiment, a laser output port of the laser sighting device is recessed from a fore end of the gunstock within the cavity. For this exemplary embodiment, the laser sighting device includes at least one of an elevation adjustment and a windage adjustment, and the gunstock includes an access hole for each adjustment. The laser sighting device can also include an actuator switch that, when actuated, causes the laser sighting device to emit a laser beam.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter disclosed herein is illustrated by way of example and not by limitation in the accompanying figures in which like reference numerals indicate similar elements and in which:

FIG. 1A shows a left side view of a portion of a first exemplary gunstock assembly having a laser sighting device;

FIG. 1B shows a top view of a portion of the first exemplary gunstock assembly;

FIG. 1C shows a front view of a portion of the first exemplary gunstock assembly;

FIG. 1D shows a front view of an exemplary embodiment of a base for a laser sighting device;

FIG. 1E shows a right side view of the exemplary embodiment of the base shown in FIG. 1D;

FIG. 2 shows a top view of a portion of a second exemplary gunstock assembly having a laser sighting device; and

FIG. 3 shows a top view of a portion of a third exemplary gunstock assembly having a laser sighting device.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1A shows a left side view of a portion of a first exemplary gunstock assembly 100 having a laser sighting device. FIG. 1B shows a top view of a portion of exemplary gunstock assembly 100. FIG. 1C shows a front view of a portion of exemplary gunstock assembly 100. Gunstock assembly 100 includes a gunstock 101 having a cavity 102, a base, or bracket, 103 and a laser sighting device 104. While cavity 102 is depicted as providing more space than is absolutely needed for containing base 103 and laser sighting device 104, it should be understood that the term “cavity” as used herein means a space within a gunstock that at least contains a sighting device. Base 103 securely holds laser sighting device 104 within cavity 102 in a manner such that a portion of body 104a of laser sighting device 104 extends from fore end 101a of gunstock 101.

Gunstock 101 can be a unitary-body gunstock or a gunstock formed by at least two mating pieces. In one exemplary embodiment, gunstock 101 can be a gunstock for a Ruger Model 10/22 firearm made by Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. in Southport, Conn. or by Butler Creek in Belgrade, Mont. It should be understood, though, that the subject matter disclosed hererin is not limited to use of a gunstock for a Ruger Model 10/22 firearm and is applicable to other gunstocks for other types of firearms and to gunstocks made by other manufacturers. In one exemplary embodiment, laser sighting device 104 can be, for example, the PLR-0006-140 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch or the PLR-0006-090 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch available from LaserLyte, L.L.C., located in Cottonwood, Ariz. It should be understood, though, that the subject matter disclosed herein is not limited to use of the PLR-0006-140 or the PLR-0006-090 laser sighting devices available from LaserLyte, L.L.C. and is applicable to other laser sighting devices available from LaserLyte, L.L.C. and/or from other manufacturers and suppliers.

FIG. 1D shows a front view of base 103 for laser sighting device 104. FIG. 1E shows a right side view of base 103 and a front portion 103a of base 103. Back portion 104b of laser sighting device 104 is securely clamped by base 103. In an alternative embodiment, the back portion of laser sighting device 104 includes threads that threadably engage a threaded aperture in base 103. In yet another alternative embodiment, the back portion of laser sighting device 104 is press fit into an aperture in base 103.

Laser sighting device 104 includes a windage adjustment 105 and an elevation adjustment 106 that are used for accurately setting the pointing direction of laser sighting device 104 with respect to the barrel (not shown) of a firearm (not shown) to which gunstock assembly 100 is attached. Laser sighting device 104 includes a compartment for batteries (not shown) internal to laser sighting device 104 and wires 107 that are coupled to an activation switch 108. Activation switch 108 includes an electrical contact portion 108a and an actuation extension member 108b. Activation switch 108 is accessible on the left side of gunstock 101. When activation switch 108 is depressed, actuation extension member 108b transmits the depressing force to electrical contact portion 108a, thereby completing an electrical circuit and causing laser sighting device 104 to emit a laser beam from laser output port 104c. Electrical contact portion 108a includes a resilient spring member that opens the electrical circuit when pressure is removed from actuation switch 108. Activation switch 108 could alternatively be accessible on the bottom or on the right side of gunstock 101. Additionally or alternatively, activation switch could have a different physical configuration as long as laser sighting device 104 emits a laser beam while the activation switch is activated.

Prior to use, the elevation and windage adjustments are set in conjunction with the sight settings for the firearm on which gunstock assembly 101 is mounted. In use, the firearm on which gun stock assembly 100 is mounted is pointed toward a target by a user, and the user depresses actuation switch 108, thereby causing laser sighting device 104 to emit a laser beam that appears on the target. The user then uses a dot formed by the laser beam on the target for accurately aiming the firearm.

FIG. 2 shows a top view of a portion of a second exemplary gunstock assembly 200 having a laser sighting device. Gunstock assembly 200 includes a gunstock 201 having a cavity 202, a base 203 and a laser sighting device 204. Base 203 securely holds a laser sighting device 204 within cavity 202 in a manner such that the laser output port 204b of laser sighting device 204 is substantially flush with fore end 201a of gunstock 201. It should be understood that the subject matter disclosed herein is applicable to gunstocks for all types of firearms and to gunstocks made by many different manufacturers. Laser sighting device 204 can be, for example, the PLR-0006-140 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch or the PLR-0006-090 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch available from LaserLyte, L.L.C., located in Cottonwood, Ariz.

Gunstock assembly 200 includes access holes (not shown) for the windage adjustment and the elevation adjustment provided by laser sighting device 204. Laser sighting device 204 includes a compartment for batteries (not shown) internal to laser sighting device 204 and wires 207 that are coupled to an activation switch 208. Activation switch 208 includes an electrical contact portion 208a and an actuation extension member 208b. Activation switch 208 is accessible on the left side of gunstock 201. When activation switch 208 is depressed, actuation extension member 208b transmits the depressing force to electrical contact portion 208a, thereby completing an electrical circuit and causing laser sighting device 204 to emit a laser beam from laser output port 204b. Electrical contact portion 208a includes a resilient spring member that opens the electrical circuit when pressure is removed from actuation switch 208. Activation switch 208 could alternatively be accessible on the bottom or on the right side of gunstock 201. Additionally or alternatively, activation switch could have a different physical configuration as long as laser sighting device 204 emits a laser beam while the activation switch is activated.

FIG. 3 shows a top view of a portion of a third exemplary gunstock assembly 300 having a laser sighting device. Gunstock assembly 300 includes a gunstock 301 having a cavity 302, a base 303 and a laser sighting device 304. Base 303 securely holds a laser sighting device 304 within cavity 302 in a manner such that the laser sighting device 304 is recessed or can be located anywhere within the cavity of the stock within fore end 301a of gunstock 301. It should be understood that the subject matter disclosed herein is applicable to gunstocks for all types of firearms and to gunstocks made by many different manufacturers. Laser sighting device 304 can be, for example, the PLR-0006-140 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch or the PLR-0006-090 Universal Pistol Laser with wireless switch available from LaserLyte, L.L.C., located in Cottonwood, Ariz.

Gunstock assembly 300 includes access holes (not shown) for the windage adjustment and the elevation adjustment provided by laser sighting device 304 Laser sighting device 304 includes a compartment for batteries (not shown) internal to laser sighting device 304 and wires 307 that are coupled to pressure pad, etc. an activation switch 308. Activation switch 308 includes an electrical contact portion 308a and an actuation extension member 308b. Activation switch 308 is accessible on the left side of gunstock 301. When activation switch 308 is depressed, actuation extension member 308b transmits the depressing force to electrical contact portion 308a, thereby completing an electrical circuit and causing laser sighting device 304 to emit a laser beam from laser output port 304b. Electrical contact portion 308a includes a resilient spring member that opens the electrical circuit when pressure is removed from actuation switch 308. Activation switch 308 could alternatively be accessible on the bottom or on the right side of gunstock 301. Additionally or alternatively, activation switch could have a different physical configuration as long as laser sighting device 304 emits a laser beam while the activation switch is activated.

Although the subject matter disclosed herein has been described in some detail for purposes of clarity of understanding, it will be apparent that certain changes and modifications may be practiced that are within the scope of the appended claims. Accordingly, the present embodiments are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive, and the subject matter disclosed herein is not to be limited to the details given herein, but may be modified within the scope and equivalents of the appended claims.