Title:
Toeball - rules of the game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Toeball is a new sport, similar in many respects to soccer (American) and futbol (International), but with important evolutionary changes that make it something radical and new. In Toeball, the field has new markings, and the goal stands partially blocked off by a “bounce board” around the edges. In Toeball, we have only 10 players on the field at any one time because there is no goalkeeper—nor is there an offside penalty. Shots from the field count for two or three points, and foul shots count for one point, like basketball. Teams must shoot the ball within 40 seconds of when they take possession, or lose possession. Referees are required to make foul calls whenever one player initiates contact against another player, which makes toeball a much gentler game than the game of soccer. When making an in-bounds pass, players can kick the ball in or throw it in. There are no corner kicks. The clock stops on every referee whistle and does not start again until an inbounds player touches the ball. Finally, in toeball, we have four 15-minute quarters, teams can call multiple time outs in each quarter, and teams can make substitutions from the bench with much greater frequency than in the sport of soccer. The combination of a few radical new rules changes, plus the additional of many evolutionary rules changes add up cumulatively to a completely new and original sport worthy of a patent in its own right.



Inventors:
Lion, James Michel (West Hollywood, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/120276
Publication Date:
03/29/2007
Filing Date:
09/29/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B67/00
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Primary Examiner:
ARYANPOUR, MITRA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
James Lion (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Claims:
1. This specification applies to patent application Ser. No. 11/120,276, filed May 3, 2005 by James Michel Lion. The game or sport of toeball is an entirely new sport original in design and concept, made by combining two preexisting sports—namely soccer (or futbol) and basketball. Specifically, toeball takes the general game of soccer, and changes the rules around to more closely resemble the rules of basketball, such as the scoring system of basketball. Furthermore, the sport of toeball contains several unique and completely original inventions that make it much more than merely a combination of two preexisting sports, and make it capable to stand alone as a new and unique sport within its own right. These innovations include the creation of a new kind of goal, about the size and shape of a soccer goal, but with a “bounce board” around the sides; new markings on the field-of-play; new rules about making in-bounds passes or kicks, and new rules regarding goaltending. Please see also accompanying toeball rules. The sole inventor of this sport, James Michel Lion, claims sole and undisputed right to commercial exploitation of this sport, worldwide, in any and all venues, including but not limited to amateur athletic competitions and leagues, and/or professional athletic competitions and leagues. Those who wish to enjoy this sport for fun, and have no intent to commercially exploit this sport or the toeball trademark are not claimed to be covered by this patent application. However, any individual or company that inadvertently profits from the sport of toeball, the patent applicant hereby claims within the purview of this patent application.

Description:

Measure and mark the playing field in accordance with the Toeball Field of Play diagram.

The surface of the field of play must be flat and covered with grass.

The field must measure 100 yards long and 50 yards wide, with clear boundary lines called the end line and sidelines. It must have a clear line parallel to the end lines and equidistant from them called the midfield line. It must have two clear lines parallel to the midfield line, each 10 yards offset from the midfield line, called the three-point lines.

Mark a center circle exactly in the center of the field, with a 10-yard radius.

Mark a square penalty area at each end of the field 40 yards wide along the end line and 20 yards deep into the field. Mark a half-circle foul shot area, with a 10-yard radius, at the top of each penalty area so the flat portion of the half-circle faces toward the nearest respective goal.

Mark a square goaltending area at each end of the field, 20-yards wide along the end line and 10-yards deep into the field, directly in front of each goal.

The area from the end line, to the nearest three-point line we call the offensive zone for the team shooting at the goal at that end of the field. The rest of the field we call the defensive zone for that team.

The 2-point shot-on-goal area for each team consists of its offensive zone.

The 3-point shot-on-goal area for each team consists of its defensive zone.

The goal measures 8′ tall and 20′ across. Each goal must rest in the middle of each end line, with its front face on the outer edge of the line, and face with the goalmouth open toward the field.

The goalmouth measures 5′ tall and 12′ across. A wooden or hard plastic bounce board surrounds the mouth of the goal. It extends 18′ below the bottom of the goalmouth, 4′ out to either side of the goalmouth, and 18′ above the top of the goalmouth. The edges of the bounce board extend out to the extremities of the goal.

Attach nets, made of cloth or nylon, to each goal, behind it and off the field of play. The nets must catch all shots on goal that enter the goalmouth.

A metal or wood framework, or goal, open at the goalmouth, supports the bounce board and the net.

Home management must have on hand a spare goal, bounce board, and net in case of breakage.

The ball must be an officially approved Major League Toeball (MLT) ball between 27 to 28 inches in circumference, weighing 14 to 16 ounces, and inflated to 8½ to 9½ pounds pressure.

The basic compulsory equipment for a player consists of a jersey or shirt, shorts, socks, shin guards, and footwear.

One-digit or two-digit numbers must appear on the back of all shirts. Each player must have two shirts—a basic white one for home games and a basic dark colored one for away games. The colors of the numbers on the shirts must contrast with the basic shirt color.

Socks must entirely cover the shin guards.

Shin guards must provide a reasonable degree of protection, and come from a suitable material (rubber, plastic or similar substances).

Footwear must come from canvas or soft leather, or similar substance, with soles and cleats of rubber or similar material. No metallic soles or cleats allowed.

A player must not use equipment or wear anything dangerous to himself or any other player, including any kind of jewelry.

The game officials shall be a crew chief and two referees—assisted by an official scorer and two trained timers. One timer will operate the game clock and the other will operate the 40-second clock. Only MLT approved officials may serve.

The officials shall wear the uniform prescribed by MLT.

The officials shall, prior to the start of the game, inspect and approve all equipment, including field of play, goals, nets, balls, lines, timer's and scorer's equipment.

The officials shall not permit players to play with any type of hand, arm, face, nose, ear, head or neck jewelry.

The officials shall not permit any player to wear equipment, which, in his judgment, is dangerous to other players. Any equipment that is of hard substance (casts, splints, guards and braces) requires padding or foam covering with no exposed sharp or cutting edge. All the facemasks and eye or nose protectors must conform to the contour of the face and have no sharp or protruding edges. Approval is on a game-to-game basis.

The officials must check the game ball to see that it is properly inflated. The recommended ball pressure should be 8½ to 9½ pounds.

The crew chief shall be the official in charge.

If a coach desires to discuss a rule or interpretation of a rule prior to the start of a game or between periods, it will be mandatory for the officials to ask the other coach to be present during the discussion. The officials must follow this same procedure if they wish to discuss a game situation with either coach.

The designated official shall drop the ball at the start of the game. The crew chief shall decide whether a goal shall count if the officials disagree, and he shall decide matters upon which scorers and timers disagree.

All officials shall be present during the 20-minute pre-game warm-up period to review scoring and timing procedures with table personnel. Officials may await the on-field arrival of the first team.

Officials must meet with team captains prior to the start of the game.

Officials must report any atypical or unique incident to the designated TAA representative. Officials must report flagrant, punching, kicking or fighting fouls, or a team's failure to have 12 players present to begin the game.

The officials shall have the power to make decisions on any point not specifically covered in the rules. They must advise the designated TAA representative of all such decisions at the earliest possible moment.

The crew chief shall have the authority to set aside or question decisions regarding a rule interpretation made by either one of the other officials.

It is the primary duty of the crew chief to determine whether a shot-on-goal attempt shall count, if successful. If he does not know, he will ask the other officials for assistance. If none of the officials knows, the official timer makes the final decision.

If the officials give conflicting signals as to who caused a ball to go out-of-bounds, a drop ball must occur between the two players involved. However, the calling officials may change the call after consulting with one another.

In the event that a violation and foul occur at the same time, the foul will take precedence.

The officials have the power to render decisions for infractions of rules committed inside or outside the boundary lines. This includes periods of game stoppage.

When a personal foul or violation occurs, an official will blow his whistle to terminate play. The whistle is the signal for the timer to stop the game clock. If a personal foul has occurred, the official will indicate the number of the offender to the official scorer, the type of foul committed and the number of free kicks, if any, to be attempted or indicate the spot of the inbounds pass. If a violation has occurred the official will indicate (1) the nature of the violation by giving the correct signal (2) the number of the offender, if applicable (3) the direction in which the ball will be advanced.

When a team is entitled to an inbounds pass, an official shall clearly signal (1) the act that caused the ball to become dead (2) the spot of the inbounds pass (3) the team entitled to the inbounds pass, unless it follows a successful shot-on-goal or free shot.

When a whistle sounds erroneously, whether the ball is in a possession or non-possession status, it counts as an inadvertent whistle and causes suspension-of-play.

Officials may correct an error if a rule is inadvertently set aside and results in the following: (1) a team takes an unmerited free shot (2) the wrong player takes a merited free shot (3) a team fails to take a merited free shot. In each case, the timer stops the clock, the official corrects the error, and play resumes from the point of interruption.

The Officials must discover and rectify all errors that occur in the first or third periods, prior to the start of the next period.

The Officials must discover and rectify all errors that occur in the second period prior to the officials leaving the floor at the end of the period.

The Officials must discover and rectify all errors that occur in the fourth period or overtime(s) prior to the end of the period.

If the second, third or fourth period begins with the wrong team awarded possession: (1) if less than 40 seconds have elapsed, officials must nullify all play and restart the period (2) if more than 40 seconds have elapsed, officials must allow the game to continue without correcting the error.

The Officials cannot nullify any points scored off free shots rewarded for acts of unsportsmanlike conduct and flagrant fouls.

The officials may correct a record keeping error by the official scorer, which involves the score, number of personal fouls and/or timeouts, at any time prior to the end of the fourth period. They must correct any such error that occurs in overtime prior to the end of that period.

The scorers shall record the shots-on-goal made, the free shots made and missed and shall keep a running summary of the points scored. They shall record the personal and technical fouls called on each player and shall notify the officials immediately whenever they call a third personal foul on any player. They shall record the timeouts charged to each team, shall notify a team and its coach through an official whenever that team takes its last legal timeout and shall notify the nearest official each time a team is granted a charged timeout in excess of the legal number. In case there is a question about an error in the scoring, the scorer shall check with the crew chief at once to find the discrepancy. If they cannot find an error, the official shall accept the record of the official scorer, unless he has knowledge that forces him to decide otherwise.

The scorers shall keep a record of the names, numbers and positions of the players who are to start the game and of all substitutes who enter the game. When there is an infraction of the rules pertaining to submission of the lineup, substitutions or numbers of players, they shall notify the nearest official immediately if the ball is dead, or as soon as it becomes dead if it is in play when the scorer discovers the infraction. The scorer shall mark the time when players disqualify due to receiving three personal fouls, so that it may be easy to ascertain the order in which the players are eligible to go back into the game in accordance with [2001] and [2002].

The scorers shall use a horn or other device unlike that used by the officials or timers to signal the officials. The scorer may use this device only when the ball is dead or in certain specified situations when the ball is in control of a given team.

When the scorer or timer indicates a player disqualified from the game, or a penalty free shot awarded, they must notify the game officials with a buzzer, siren or some other clearly audible sound. It is the duty of the scorer to be certain the officials have acknowledged the third personal foul buzzer and the penalty shot buzzer.

The scorer shall not signal the officials while the ball is in play, except to notify them of the necessity to correct an error.

The players on the field should ignore the horn while the ball is in play. The officials must use their judgment in stopping play to consult with the scorers table.

Scorers shall record on the scoreboard the number of team fouls up to a total of four, which will indicate that the team is in a penalty situation.

Scorers must immediately record the name of the team that secures the first possession of the game.

The timers shall note when each half is to start and shall notify the crew chief and both coaches five minutes before this time. They shall signal the scorers two minutes before starting time. They shall record playing time and time of stoppages as provided in the rules. The official timer and the 40-second clock operator shall be provided with digital stop watches to be used with the timing of timeouts and in case the official game clock and 40-second clocks located behind the goals fail to work properly.

At the beginning of the first period, any overtime period or during a drop ball, the game clock and 40-second clock both start when any player touches the ball. In case of an illegal drop ball requiring a new drop, the timer resets the 40-second clock.

If the game clock stops for a violation, successful shot-on-goal or free shot attempt and the ball put in play by an inbounds pass, the game clock and the 40-second clock start when any player on the field legally touches the ball. The starting of the game clock and the 40-second clock will be under the control of the official timer.

During an unsuccessful free shot attempt, the game clock starts when any player legally touches the ball. The 40-second clock resets when a player from either team gains clear possession of the ball.

The game clock stops at the expiration of time for each period and when an official signals timeout. For a charged timeout, the timer shall start a digital stopwatch and shall signal the official when it is time to resume play.

The game clock and the scoreboard will combine to cause a horn to sound, automatically, when playing time for the period has expired. If the horn or buzzer fails to sound, or is not heard, the official timer shall use any other means to notify the officials immediately. In the meantime, if a player scores a successful shot-on-goal or commits a personal foul, the Crew Chief shall consult his fellow officials and the official timer. If the official timer states that time expired before the shot-on-goal attempt left the players foot, the field goal shall not count. If the official timer states that time expired before the personal foul occurred, they must disregard the personal foul, unless it was unsportsmanlike. If there is a disagreement between the officials and the official timer, the shot-on-goal counts and the personal foul penalized, unless the officials have other personal knowledge.

In a dead ball situation, if the clock shows time has expired, then the period or game is over, even if the horn hasn't sounded.

Each team consists of ten players. No team may have fewer than ten players. If a player in the game receives his third personal foul and the official has disqualified all substitutes, said player shall remain in the game and charged with a personal and team foul, and a technical foul assessed against his team. All subsequent personal fouls by this player, including offensive fouls, receive the same treatment. All players receive the same treatment that have three or more personal fouls and remain in the game.

In the event only ten eligible players remain and one of these players must leave the game due to injury or ejection, replace him with the last player disqualified for receiving three personal fouls. Treat each subsequent requirement to replace an injured or ejected player the same way.

In the event that a player becomes ill and must leave the field while the ball is in play, the official stops play immediately when the team of the ill player gains possession. Substitutions can occur once play has stopped.

At least ten minutes before the game begins, each team must supply the scorers with the name and number of each player who may participate in the game. Each team must indicate their starting line-up.

The coach's position may be on or off the bench from the three-point line to the end line. They are permitted between the three-point line and the midfield line to relay information to players but must return to the bench side of the three-point line immediately or be called for an non-unsportsmanlike technical foul. A coach is not permitted to cross the midfield line, or the end line and violators will be assessed an unsportsmanlike technical foul immediately. All assistants and trainers must remain on the bench. Coaches and trainers may not go to the scorer's table, for any reason, except during a dead ball.

The coach may not at any time play in the game.

Any club personnel not seated on the bench must conduct themselves in a dignified manner at all times just prior to, during and just after the game.

Only head coaches approved by MLT may sit on the bench at any time, plus up to three additional individuals who may be assistant coaches or trainers.

A team's goal consists of the metal or wood framework or goal, the bounce board and the net into which its players try to kick the ball. The visiting team has the choice of goals for the first half. The goal selected by the visiting team when it first enters onto the field shall be its goal for the first half.

The teams change goals for the second half—which includes all overtime periods.

The goalmouth and facing sides of the bounce board are inbounds when contacted by the ball. The back of the bounce board, the back and sides of the goal superstructure, and the net are out-of-bounds.

The edges of the bounce board (two sides and top) are inbounds.

The goalmouth zone—defined as that area encompassed on all sides by the goalmouth line, the end line and the diagonal lines—shall be out-of-bounds for players, but in-bounds when the ball passes through it. If the ball comes to a full and complete stop inside the goalmouth zone, the official must deem it out-of-bounds and determine possession according to [7001]-[7011]

Blocking is illegal personal contact that impedes the progress of an opponent.

A dribble is movement of the ball, caused by a player in control, who kicks the ball on the ground or into the air. The dribble ends when the player takes a shot-on-goal, passes the ball so it goes outside the player's control, or if another player takes control of the ball.

A common personal foul is illegal physical contact that occurs with an opponent after the ball has become live.

A technical foul is the penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct or violations by team members on the floor or seated on the bench. This includes illegal contact that occurs with an opponent before the ball becomes live.

A double foul is a situation in which two opponents commit personal or technical fouls against each other at approximately the same time.

A loose ball foul is illegal contact, after the ball is alive, when team control does not exist.

A flagrant foul is unnecessary and/or excessive contact committed by a player against an opponent whether the ball is dead or alive.

A free shot is the privilege given a player to score one point from a position inside the foul shot area. The player may not leave this area until after taking the foul shot and the ball has subsequently gone in the goalmouth, bounces off the bounce board, or gone out of bounds. The player has 10 seconds from the official whistle to take this shot.

A team's offensive zone consists of the playing field between its goal and the nearest edge of the nearest three-point line, including the goalmouth zone and bounce board.

A team's defensive zone consists of the entire three-point line from [3014] and the rest of the playing field to include the opponent's goalmouth zone and bounce board.

A ball controlled by a player: (1) is in the offensive zone only if the ball touches the offensive zone, (2) is in the defensive zone only if the ball touches the defensive zone.

The ball enters the offensive zone once it breaks the plane of the three-point line due to the action of a controlling player.

Illegal contact occurs whenever a player touches the ball with his hands, arms, or shoulders.

A screen is the legal action of a player who, without causing undue contact, delays or prevents an opponent from reaching a desired position.

A shot-on-goal occurs when a player tries to kick the ball into his goal for a 2-point or 3-point score. The act of shooting starts when, in the official's judgment, the player has started his shooting motion and continues until the shooting motion ceases and he returns to a normal field position. It is not essential that the ball receive a kick from the shooter's foot. An opponent or accident may block his legs or body and prevent him from actually kicking the ball. The term also includes the path of the ball until it stops moving or another player touches it. During any shot-on-goal attempt, the player must kick the ball, or otherwise impel it toward the goal before the game clock expires or the goal, if any, doesn't count.

An inbounds pass is a method of putting the ball in play from out-of-bounds in accordance with [7006]. The inbounds pass begins when the ball is at the disposal of the team or player entitled to it, and ends after the kick-in or throw-in, when another player touches the ball on the playing field.

When the game clock shows 4:00, the game enters the four-minute period.

During any free shot attempt, an opponent in the game who is in the visual field of the free shot kicker may not distract him by (1) waving his arms, (2) making a sudden dash up field, (3) talking to the free shot kicker, or (4) talk loudly in a disruptive manner.

An official can suspend play for retrieving an errant ball, re-setting the timing devices, delay-of-game warning, inadvertent whistle or any other unusual circumstance. During such a suspension, substitutions cannot occur, and only the team in possession of the ball can request a timeout.

A team is in possession when a player dribbles or passes the ball. Team possession ends when the defensive team takes possession of the ball, or the offensive team attempts a shot-on-goal.

A legal shot-on-goal or free shot attempt scores when a live ball from the playing field enters the goal through the goalmouth.

A successful shot-on-goal from the offensive area counts for two points.

A successful shot-on-goal from the defensive area counts for three points.

A field goal accidentally scored in an opponent's goal counts for two points added onto the opponent's score. The opposing player nearest the shooter gets credit for the points.

A player may not attempt a shot-on-goal at an opponent's goal. If he does, his team loses possession of the ball and the opposing team receives an inbounds pass from the nearest three-point line.

A successful free shot attempt counts one point.

If there is a discrepancy in the score and it cannot be resolved, the running score shall be official.

All periods of regulation play in MLT last 15 minutes.

All overtime periods of regulation play in MLT last 6 minutes.

All halftime periods of regulation play in MLT last 15 minutes.

The time between the first and second periods, the third and fourth periods and before any overtime period lasts 3 minutes.

Each team has 30 seconds to replace a disqualified player.

The game enters the four-minute part when the game clock shows 4:00 or less time remaining in the period.

The public address operator is required to announce when 4 minutes remain in each period.

The game clock shall be equipped to show tenths-of-a-second during the last minute of each period.

Each period ends when time expires. EXCEPTIONS: (1) If a live ball is in flight, the period ends when the shot-on-goal enters the goalmouth, leaves the playing field, stops moving, or a player touches it. (2) If the official's whistle sounds prior to the horn or 00.0 on the clock, the period is not over and the clock reset to where it was when the whistle sounded (3) If a timeout request occurs at approximately the instant time expires for a period, the period ends and the official must deny the timeout.

If the ball is dead and the game clock shows 00.0, the period has ended even though the horn may not have sounded.

With a score tied at the end of the fourth period, play resumes in 3 minutes without change of goals for any of the overtime periods required.

The timing devices stop following a successful shot-on-goal during the last 4 minutes of every regulation period and during the last 2 minutes of every overtime period.

The timing devices stop whenever the official's whistle sounds indicating one of the following: (1) a personal or technical foul (2) a drop ball (3) a dead or out-of-bounds ball (4) an unusual delay or suspension (5) a time-out.

Officials may not use official time to permit a player to change gear.

The official honors a player's request for a 40-second timeout only when the ball is dead or in control of the team making the request. The official ignores all other requests.

Each team has one (1) 40-second timeout per half, for a total of two (2) per game, including overtimes.

During a 40-second timeout, a team may substitute one or two players. If the team calling the 40-second timeout replaces one or two players, the opposing team may also replace one or two players. EXCEPTION: In the last 4 minutes of the fourth period and/or during any overtime period, both teams have free substitution privileges.

If a player requests a second 40-second timeout during a half (including over-times), his team receives a regular timeout.

The official shall instruct the timer to record the 40 seconds and inform him when the time expires. If play cannot resume at the expiration of the 40-second period, the official charges the team with an additional regular timeout. EXCEPTION: The official can waive this requirement if a team has run out of regular timeouts and has an injured player on the field.

Players should say “40-second timeout” when requesting this time.

During the last 4 minutes of the first, second and third quarters, the last 4 minutes of the fourth quarter, and during overtime play, the team granted a 40-second timeout has the option of where to put the ball into play. They may select a three-point line in the offensive zone, a three-point line in the defensive zone, or any spot on the defensive end line outside the edges of the penalty area.

A 40-second timeout shall not be granted or charged to any team during an official's suspension-of-play for (1) delay-of-game warning, (2) retrieving an errant ball, (3) an inadvertent whistle or (4) any other unusual circumstance.

The official honors a player's request for a 90-second timeout only when the ball is dead or in control of the team making the request. The official ignores all other requests.

Each team is entitled to six (6) charged timeouts during regulation play. Each team is limited to no more than three (3) timeouts in the fourth period and no more than two (2) timeouts in the last 4 minutes of regulation play. (This is in addition to one 40-second timeout per half.)

During a regular timeout, both teams may have unlimited substitutions.

In overtime periods, each team has three (3) 60-second timeouts regardless of the number of timeouts called or remaining during regulation play or previous overtimes.

There must be two 90-second timeouts in the first and third periods and three 90-second timeouts in the second and fourth periods. If neither team has taken a timeout prior to 4:59 of the first or third period, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it at the first dead ball and charge it to the home team. If no subsequent timeouts occur prior to 2:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it and charge it to the team not previously charged. If neither team has taken a timeout prior to 7:59 of the second or fourth period, the Official Scorer must call a mandatory timeout and charge it to neither team. If there are no subsequent timeouts taken prior to 4:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it at the first dead ball and charge it to the home team. If no subsequent timeouts occur prior to 2:59, it shall be mandatory for the Official Scorer to take it and charge it to the team not previously charged. The Official Scorer shall notify a team when it receives a mandatory timeout.

A 90-second timeout shall not be granted or charged to any team during an official's suspension-of-play for (1) delay-of-game warning, (2) retrieving an errant ball, (3) an inadvertent whistle or (4) any other unusual circumstance.

During the last 4 minutes of the first, second and third quarters, the last 4 minutes of the fourth quarter, and during overtime play, the team granted a 90-second timeout has the option of where to put the ball into play. They may select a three-point line in the offensive zone, a three-point line in the defensive zone, or any spot on the defensive end line outside the edges of the penalty area.

The official shall charge the team with a regular timeout if it formally challenges an official ruling and requests a rule interpretation. If the rules sustain the formal challenge, the officials must not charge any timeout to the challenging team.

Officials must grant requests for timeout in excess of the authorized number, and then assess a technical foul against the requesting team. Following the timeout, the opposing team takes possession of the ball. They select the spot for the inbounds pass from any of the four locations on the field where a three-point line intersects a sideline.

If an official, upon receiving a timeout request from the defensive team, inadvertently signals while the play is in progress, play stops and the team in possession takes an inbounds pass at the three-point line mark nearest where the ball was when the signal occurred. The 40-second clock remains the same.

If an official, upon receiving a timeout request from the defensive team, inadvertently signals for a timeout during a successful shot-on-goal or free shot attempt, the point(s) count. If this occurs during an unsuccessful shot-on-goal attempt, play resumes with a drop ball at the drop circle between any two opponents. If this occurs during an unsuccessful free shot attempt, the official applies the distraction rule [3023] and awards a substitute free shot.

If an official inadvertently blows his whistle during (1) a successful shot-on-goal or free shot attempt, the points count, or (2) an unsuccessful shot-on-goal or free shot attempt, play resumes with a drop ball at the drop circle between any two opponents.

When a team receives a timeout, play resumes after the full amount of time elapses, and not before it elapses.

A player cannot call a timeout unless both feet touch ground somewhere on the field of play. Only a designated team coach can call timeout from the bench.

After time has been out, the game clock restarts when any player on the field of play legally touches the ball.

On an unsuccessful free shot, if the ball continues in play, the game clock restarts when any player legally touches the ball.

If play resumes with an inbounds pass, the game clock restarts when any player legally touches the ball on the field of play.

If play resumes with a drop ball, the game clock restarts when any player legally touches the ball within the drop circle.

The game and overtimes start with a drop ball in the drop circle.

The team that gains first possession at the beginning of the game also kicks the ball into play at their defensive zone end line to begin the fourth period. The other team kicks the ball into play at their defensive zone end line to begin the second and third periods.

In making an inbounds pass, the kicker must place the ball at the designated spot on the ground prior to kicking it in. If the player opts to throw the ball in, he must do so from the spot designated by the official. All defensive players on the field must give the kicker a 3-yard clearance so he has room to make the kick. Offensive players can disregard the 3-yard clearance rule.

After any dead ball, play resumes with a drop ball, inbounds pass or free shot.

After any normal shot-on-goal, the scored upon team takes possession of the ball with an inbounds pass from their defensive end line, from an area on the end line, but outside the penalty area. This rule does not apply when the inbounds pass follows a timeout, or if the official calls a foul during the shot-on-goal.

On the following infractions, the ball goes to the opposing team out-of-bounds at the nearest three-point line: (1) 40-second violation (2) offensive screen set out-of-bounds (3) free throw violation by the offensive team (4) any foul not resulting in a free shot (5) ball bouncing off an out-of-bounds area of the goal and back into play (6) offensive interference with a shot-on-goal (7) accidental illegal contact with the ball outside the penalty area

On the following infractions, the ball goes to the opposing team on the end line at the nearest spot outside the edge of the penalty area: (1) the ball goes out-of-bounds on the end line (2) an inbounds pass violation occurs on the end line.

On any play where the ball goes out-of-bounds on the sideline, the ball goes to the opposing team at that spot.

Following a regular 90-second timeout called while the ball was alive, the inbounds pass occurs on the sideline at the nearest three-point line upon resumption of play, except as specified in [4038].

Following a special 40-second timeout called while the ball was alive, the inbounds pass occurs on the sideline at the three-point line selected by the offensive team, except as specified in [4040].

The official must give the ball to the offensive player as soon as he is in a position out-of-bounds and ready to accept the ball. If either team substitutes a player on the field, the official must wait until the substitution finishes.

The ball becomes live when: (1) an official releases it during a drop ball (2) an official puts it at the disposal of an offensive player for an inbounds pass (3) an official puts it at the disposal of a free shot kicker.

The ball becomes alive when: (1) a player legally touches it after an official releases it during a drop ball (2) a player legally kicks it inbounds (3) a player kicks it during a free shot attempt.

The ball becomes dead and/or remains dead when the following occurs: (1) an official blows his/her whistle (2) a free shot automatically followed by another free shot (3) following a score, but before the official puts the ball at the disposal of the inbounds pass player (4) time expires for the end of any period. EXCEPTION: If a live ball is in flight, the ball becomes dead after a successful shot, a miss, or when touched by an offensive player.

The official puts the ball into play in the drop circle by a drop ball between any two opponents: (1) at the start of the game (2) at the start of each overtime period (3) when two players foul each other (4) due to a suspension of play during a loose ball (5) when the officials cannot determine what team caused the ball to go out-of-bounds (6) when both players in a drop ball touch the ball before it strikes ground

The start of game drop ball occurs between any two opponents in the game at that time. If injury, ejection or disqualification makes it necessary to replace any player, his substitute may not participate in the drop ball.

Where applicable, all other drop balls occur between two of the players involved, one from each team, unless injury or ejection precludes one of the players from participation. In this case, the coach of the team may select a different player to participate in the drop ball, and the injured or ejected player cannot return to the game.

All drop balls take place at the drop circle.

Each drop ball participant must have at least one foot on or inside his half of the drop circle, which is farthest from his own goal.

The drop ball must strike ground before either player can touch it. If a player touches the ball before it strikes ground, possession of the ball goes to the other team.

Neither drop ball participant may leave his half of the drop circle until one of them legally touches the ball.

The 14 other players must remain outside the drop circle until a player legally touches the drop ball. Teammates may not occupy adjacent positions around the circumference of the drop circle if an opponent desires one of the positions. No player may position himself immediately behind an opponent around the circumference of the drop circle. Each team must have three players in its offensive zone and four players in its defensive zone during any drop ball.

Each team has first choice of position during the drop ball in its defensive zone and second choice in its offensive zone. The official resolves all disputes regarding choice of position during a drop ball. Players refusing to comply with the determination of the official in this regard are subject to the assessment of a technical foul by the official.

The 40-second clock starts when a team gains new possession of a ball in play.

On an inbounds pass, the 40-second clock starts when a player on the field other than the inbounds passer legally touches the ball.

An official on the field of play must signal to the timer the beginning of any new 40-second clock period when, in the determination of the official, a team gains clear possession of the ball.

A team must attempt a shot-on-goal within 40 seconds after gaining possession of the ball. To constitute a legal shot-on-goal attempt, the following applies (1) the player must kick or impel the ball prior to the expiration of 40 seconds; (2) after kicked or impelled, the ball must make contact with the goal or the bounce board, or it must enter the goalmouth for a score.

If the ball has entered the defensive zone of the last team in possession, but the official determines that the situation has changed and no team has clear possession of the ball, the timer must turn off the 40-second clock and wait until one team gains clear possession before he restarts it.

A team has possession of the ball when one player on that team gains uncontested control of the ball.

Team possession ends when: (1) a legal field goal attempt occurs, or (2) an opponent player gains possession of the ball.

If a defensive player legally touches the ball without gaining possession of the ball, the 40-second clock continues to run.

If a defensive player causes the ball to go out-of-bounds, the 40-second clock stops and the offensive team inbounds it. The offensive team has only the unexpired time remaining on the 40-second clock in which to attempt a shot-on-goal.

If the 40-second clock reads 0:00, a 40-second violation has occurred, even though the horn may not sound.

If less than 40-seconds remain in a period, the 40-second clock must not function for the rest of the period.

When in doubt about the occurrence of a 40-second shot violation, the officials make the final decision.

If a team fails to attempt a shot-on-goal within the time allotted, the official must call a 40-second violation. The official awards the ball to the defensive team at the three-point line mark nearest the spot where play was suspended.

The timer resets the 40-second clock when: (1) possession of the ball changes from one team to the other and the official signals the change of possession (2) the ball contacts the goal or bounce board of the team in possession (3) a drop ball occurs.

When the officials call a violation against the defense that does not result in a score or free shot for the offense, then the timer must leave the 40-second clock alone, or reset it to 20 seconds, whichever provides the offensive team with the most time.

The player is out-of-bounds when he touches the field or any object on or outside a boundary line. For a jumping player, his position remains that spot where he last touched the ground.

The ball is out-of-bounds when it touches a player who is out-of-bounds or any other person, the ground, or any object on, above or outside of a boundary or the supports or back of the goal.

The last player to touch the ball before it goes out-of-bounds caused it to go out, with one exception—if the ball first touches an out-of-bounds player before it touches anything else out-of-bounds, then the out-of-bounds player caused it to go out.

If the ball goes out-of-bounds and was last touched simultaneously by two opponents, both of whom are inbounds or out-of-bounds, or if the official is in doubt as to who last touched the ball, or if the officials disagree, play resumes with a drop ball between the two involved players in the drop circle.

After the ball goes out-of-bounds, the team in possession of the ball designates a player to make the inbounds pass. He makes the inbounds pass at the spot out-of-bounds nearest where the ball crossed the boundary. Once the official has put the ball at the disposal of this player, the team cannot substitute a new inbounds passer without first calling a timeout.

If a player or players trap the ball against the bounce board, the official shall make a determination as to which team caused the ball to be trapped, and shall award an inbounds pass to the opposite team from the nearest spot on the end line outside the penalty area.

The inbounds pass starts when the official puts the ball at the disposal of a designated player. He must throw or kick the ball inbounds within 8 seconds from the time the inbounds pass starts.

If no player on either team legally touches the ball after an inbounds pass, the ball returns to the original inbounds spot and a new inbounds pass granted to the opponent team.

The inbounds pass must go directly inbounds, not bounce off any object or surface situated out-of-bounds. When the passer violates this rule, a new inbounds pass goes to the opponent from the same spot as the original inbounds pass.

The passer cannot score on an inbounds pass. The ball must legally touch at least one other person before entering the goalmouth. When the passer violates this rule, a new inbounds pass goes to the opposing team from the same spot as the original inbounds pass.

No inbounds pass can occur from within the penalty area of the end line. In cases where the rules suggest otherwise, the inbound pass must occur from the nearest spot on the end line situated at the edge of the penalty area, but outside of it.

Upon awarding a free shot, the official puts the ball in play by placing it at the disposal of the free shot kicker.

The kicker must make the kick with his feet entirely within his foul shot area. Once the ball is live, he cannot leave the foul shot area until after he kicks the foul shot, unless his team calls a timeout, or if the official stops play.

If the kicker steps outside the foul shot area, he loses the shot. The opposing team inbounds the ball from a spot on their defensive end line, but outside the penalty area.

During a free shot for a personal foul, all the other players on both teams must stand (1) outside the goaltending box and along the sides of it (2) or they must stand outside the penalty area.

Once the official puts the ball in play, all other players must remain in place until after the free shot player kicks the ball.

If a defender moves, or distracts the kicker, and the free shot attempt misses, the official awards a new free shot to the kicker.

If an offensive player moves, and the free shot attempt succeeds, it doesn't count and the kicker loses the shot.

If the ball is to become dead after the last free shot, players shall not take positions along the sides of the goaltending box. Under these conditions, all players must stand outside the penalty area.

The offended player takes any free shot(s) awarded due to a personal foul.

If the offended player sustains an injury or ejection from the game, the opposing coach selects the substitute player who takes the free shot(s) from the bench of the offended team. This substitute player must remain in the game until the next whistle. The injured or ejected player cannot return to the game.

If unsportsmanlike conduct or a flagrant foul caused the offended player to sustain an injury that prevents him from taking the free shot, the injured player's coach may select any eligible player on his team to take the free shot(s). The injured player can return to the game.

The official must handle the ball prior to every free shot attempt to make it legal.

No player can stand inside the penalty area, the goaltending area or between the kicker and the goalmouth while the ball is live during a free kick.

Each free shot attempt must occur within 20 seconds after the official places the ball at the disposal of the kicker.

After a successful free shot not followed by another free shot, the ball goes into play with an inbounds pass from the end line, as after any successful shot-on-goal.

After a free shot violation by the kicker or his teammate, the inbounds pass occurs from out-of-bounds at the nearest three-point line, as determined by the official, except as noted in [8003].

After the official places the ball at the disposal of a free shot kicker, his attempt shall be within 20 seconds in such a way that the ball enters the goalmouth, or touches the goal or bounce board before any other player touches it. The kicker must make his shot from entirely within the foul shot area directly in front of his goal.

A player who stands on the edge of the goaltending box may not enter the box, nor back off 3-yards from the edge of the box during a free shot attempt. All other players must stand outside the penalty area, as determined by the official. These restrictions apply until the free shot kicker kicks the ball.

The free shot kicker cannot enter the penalty area until after the ball enters the goalmouth, strikes the goal, or strikes the bounce board.

No player can touch or deflect the ball before it enters the goalmouth, or touches the goal or bounce board on a free shot attempt.

The free shot kicker cannot deliberately fake a free shot attempt.

An opponent in the game shall not distract the free shot kicker in any way, once the official places the ball at the disposal of the kicker.

If a defensive player commits a free shot violation, the official awards another shot to the kicker.

If an offensive player commits a free shot violation, the shot is lost and does not count if scored.

When a player causes the ball to go out-of-bounds, his team loses possession of the ball. The opposing team receives an inbounds pass from a spot on the sideline or end line nearest where the ball went out-of-bounds.

A player cannot touch the ball with his hands—from the tip of the fingers to the elbow, inclusive. A player cannot deliberately try to touch the ball with any part of his arms or shoulders.

If the official determines that the player deliberately touched a ball illegally, he must assess a technical foul against the offending team and grant one free-shot to the offended team.

If the official determines that the player accidentally touched a ball illegally, but that such contact did not materially affect the game, he must assign possession of the ball to the offended team and grant an inbounds pass from the nearest three-point line.

If the official determines that, the player touched a ball illegally and in a way that materially affected the game, he must assess a technical foul against the offending team and grant two free-shots to the offended team. This must occur whether the illegal ball contact occurred by accident or on purpose. In this case, contact materially affects the game if it prevents the ball from entering the goalmouth, interrupts a pass that would have led to a clear shot-on-goal, or if it occurs within the penalty area.

If one player causes an opponent to make illegal contact with the ball, through no fault of the opponent, play continues without interruption, unless one of the players commits a personal foul, flagrant foul, or acts in an unsportsmanlike way during the play.

The inbounds pass player cannot dribble the ball onto the field, nor pass it to himself, nor fail to inbound the ball within 10 seconds. He cannot touch the ball on the field until another player has touched it. He cannot move the ball from the inbounds spot once he sets it on the ground for a kick. He cannot step inbounds while passing the ball in. He must throw or kick the ball inbounds and not throw or kick it out-of-bounds.

Once an official recognizes the designated player to inbound the ball, the offensive team cannot change the inbounds pass player without making a substitution from the bench, calling a timeout, or during a suspension of play. Violation of this rule causes loss of possession. The offended team receives a inbounds pass from the spot of the original inbounds pass.

A player participating in a drop ball must observe all drop ball rules.

The 40-second clock starts once the official indicates to the timer clear possession of the ball established by either team.

If either team commits a foul or violation during the drop ball, before the official establishes clear possession, the offended team receives possession of the ball and an inbounds pass from the nearest three-point line. If both teams commit a foul or violation, a new drop ball occurs.

If either team commits a flagrant foul or acts in an unsportsmanlike way, the official must award free shots in accordance with the rules for such behavior.

Defensive players may not block any shot-on-goal while standing in or moving into the goaltending box, except in case of [9014]. If any player blocks a shot-on-goal from within the goaltending box, the shot shall count for the offensive team the same as if it had entered the goalmouth unimpeded.

Defensive players may block a shot-on-goal while standing in or moving into the goaltending box if the shot attempt originated from within the penalty area of the offensive team. In all other cases, refer to [9013].

A player may not enter the goalmouth, nor force any other player to enter the goalmouth.

If a player enters the goalmouth, and the official determines the contact inadvertent or accidental, he may ignore the violation, at his discretion. If a player enters the goalmouth zone, and the official determines the contact deliberate, or if it affects the trajectory of the ball or the outcome of the play, the official must charge the offending party with a technical foul and grant one free shot to the opposing team. This is in addition to any calls made for goaltending.

An offensive player cannot leave the field of playing in order to set a screen for a teammate. When this occurs, the official must grant possession of the ball to the opposing team, and allow them an inbounds pass at the nearest three-point line or at the end line nearest where the violation occurred, but outside the edge of the penalty area.

The official must grant a request for a timeout in excess of the authorized number and assess a technical foul against the requesting team. During the free shot, all players must line up in the kicker's defensive zone. Following the timeout and free shot attempt, the inbounds pass goes to the team that took the free shot from the nearest three-point line, from where play stopped.

If the official grants an excessive timeout prior to a drop ball, he must cancel the drop ball, and assess a technical foul against the requesting team. Following the timeout and free shot attempt, the inbounds pass goes to the team that took the free shot from a three-point line selected by the offensive team.

The official must call delay-of-game against any team (1) that interferes with the ball after a successful goal (2) that fails to give the ball to the nearest official when a foul or violation occurs (3) that leaves the field of play during an inbounds pass (4) that prevents the prompt restart of play at any time.

The official must warn the team for its first delay-of-game violation, and assess a technical foul against the offending team for each successive violation.

A substitute must report to the official scorer while standing in the “substitution box”—an area directly in front of the scorer's table and off the field of play.

A substitute may not enter the field until an official signals he may do so.

A disqualified player or substitute cannot re-enter the game.

It is the responsibility of each team to observe substitution rules and to have the proper number of players on the field at all times. Failure to do so results in a technical foul assessed against the team.

The official must assess an unsportsmanlike foul against any player who deliberately enters any goalmouth, deliberately causes another player to enter any goalmouth, sits or stands on any part of a goal, and or pulls or tugs at any part of a goal, including the net

The official may overlook such a violation if he judges the infraction occurred to prevent injury or risk of bodily harm to a player.

An official may assess a technical foul, without warning, at any time. The official may assess a technical foul(s) against any player on the field or anyone seated on the bench for conduct detrimental to the game, but not for physical contact when the ball is alive, except for fighting and/or taunting with physical contact.

The official may assess a technical foul for unsportsmanlike tactics. These include (1) disrespectfully addressing an official (2) physically contacting an official (3) overt actions indicating resentment to a call (4) use of profanity (5) a coach entering the field without permission of an official (6) taunting (6) tripping (7) pushing or shoving (8) holding (9) sliding, jumping or charging into a player (10) spitting at a player.

The official may assess a maximum of two technical fouls for unsportsmanlike acts against player or bench personnel. The official may eject an offender for one unsportsmanlike act, but must eject an offender for two unsportsmanlike acts.

Cursing at or criticizing an official shall not be considered the only cause for imposing technical fouls. Running tirades, continuous criticism or griping may be sufficient cause to assess a technical. Excessive misconduct shall result in ejection from the game.

Officials must avoid assessing technical fouls whenever and wherever possible; but when necessary, must assess them without delay or procrastination. Once the official ejects a player or the game ends, he can no longer assess technical fouls regardless of the provocation, but he must report unsportsmanlike conduct to MLT.

If the official assesses both a technical foul and a personal foul on the same team, the free shot attempt for the technical foul goes first. The inbounds pass goes to the team that takes the free shot, whether the free shot succeeds or not. Play resumes with an inbounds pass at the three-point line nearest the spot where play stopped.

Anyone guilty of illegal contact which occurs during a dead ball may be assessed

(1) a technical foul, if the contact is deemed to be unsportsmanlike in nature, or (2) a flagrant foul, if unnecessary and/or excessive contact occurs.

When the official assesses a technical foul, any player in the game when the violation occurs may make the free shot attempt. No other player may do so. If the violation occurs before the opening drop ball, any player in the starting lineup may make the free shot attempt. If the violation occurs before the coach submits an opening lineup, any player may make the free shot attempt.

The official cannot eject any player unless he also calls a technical or flagrant foul against the offending player.

The official must eject a player, coach or trainer for (1) a punching foul (2) a fighting foul (3) an attempted punch that does not make contact (4) deliberately entering the stands or bleachers other than as a continuance of play (5) kicking a player on purpose, or trying to do so.

When the official assesses a technical foul, one free shot attempt goes to the opposing team.

No free shot attempts occur when the official assesses a double technical foul.

The deliberate act of throwing the ball or any object at an official, spectator or another player, by a player, coach or trainer is a technical foul and may cause ejection.

The Board of Directors of MLT determines all fines for unsportsmanlike behavior and flagrant fouls.

A player shall not hold, push, charge into, or impede the progress of an opponent by extending a hand, forearm, leg or knee or by bending the body into a position that is not normal, or by grabbing or tearing at clothing. Contact that results in the re-routing of an opponent is a personal foul that the official must call immediately.

Contact initiated by the defensive player guarding a player with the ball is not legal. This contact includes, but is not limited to legs, forearms, hands, or body check. The official must call this type of foul.

Any player whose actions against an opponent cause illegal contact with yet another opponent has committed a personal foul.

A personal foul committed by the offensive team during an inbounds pass shall be an offensive foul, regardless of whether the player has made the inbounds pass.

The dribbler commits a personal foul if he deliberately kicks the ball at a defender to cause illegal contact by the defender, unless this occurs during a shot-on-goal and the defender stands between the shooter and the goal.

A defensive player who commits a personal foul against an offensive player in the process of a shot-on-goal attempt receives a personal foul. His team is assessed a team foul. The offended player gets one free shot if he scored during the shot-on-goal. If he missed, he gets two free shots for a two-point shot attempt and three free shots for a three-point shot attempt.

If the official interprets contact committed against a player, with or without the ball, as excessive and unnecessary, then he must assess a flagrant foul. The penalty for a flagrant foul includes a personal foul charged to the offender and a technical foul charged to the team. The offended team gets two free shot attempts and control of the inbounds pass from the three-point line nearest where the offense occurred. If the offended player sustains injury due to the flagrant foul, the coach of his team may select a replacement shooter. This replacement shooter must stay in the game until the next whistle. The injured player cannot return to the game. The officials must eject any player who commits two flagrant fouls.

Each team is limited to two fouls per period (regular or overtime) without additional penalties. When a team commits more than two fouls per period, the excess fouls carry the penalty of one free shot attempt plus a penalty free shot attempt.

Personal fouls committed during a successful shot-on-goal attempt, which result in one free shot awarded, will not result in an additional free shot attempt if the penalty situation exists. The most points a team may score on a successful 2-point shot-on-goal is 3 points, if the player also scores on a penalty free shot. The most points a team may score on a successful 3-point shot-on-goal is 4 points, if the player also scores on a penalty free shot.

No free throw attempts occur after a double foul, whether personal or technical.

Double personal fouls add to a player's total, but not to the team total.

If a double foul occurs, the team in possession of the ball at the time of the call shall retain possession. Play resumes on the sideline, from the nearest three-point line. The timer must leave the 40-second clock alone, or reset it to 20 seconds, whichever provides the offensive team with the most time.

If a double foul occurs with neither team in possession of the ball at the time of the call, the official calls a drop ball in the drop circle. The players involved in the double foul must each participate in the drop ball, unless one of them fouls out on the call. In this case, the coach of the fouled-out player may select any other eligible player to participate in the drop ball. The substitute player must remain in the game until the next whistle.

If a double foul occurs during a successful shot-on-goal or free shot attempt, then the team scored upon inbounds the ball in from the end line, as after any other score.

If a double foul occurs due to a difference in opinion by the officials, no points count and play resumes with a drop ball at the drop circle. The coaches of each respective team may select who participates in the drop ball from among the active players on the field at the time of the double foul.

When the official assesses a personal foul against an offensive player, no points count against the defensive team if scored during the play. The offending player receives a personal foul, but his team does not receive a team foul. The offended team inbounds the ball in from the nearest three-point line.

If neither team has possession of the ball, and if the official calls a foul (not flagrant or unsportsmanlike) it's a loose ball foul. The player who committed the foul receives a personal foul, and his team receives a team foul. The offended team inbounds the ball from the nearest three-point line, unless the offending team is in a penalty situation.

If the offending team scores a goal during the commission of the loose ball foul, the official must disallow the goal.





 
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