Title:
Hurricane emergency pump
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A pumping device for extracting water directly from a functionally disabled domestic water distribution system using a two stroke pump. The pump body is an elongated tube having a reciprocating piston therein and two diametrically opposed lateral extended open ports and each port containing a backflow valve. The backflow valves open and close alternately as the piston reciprocates within the pump body The pump has a hand operated attachment means that permits the pump to be physically, mechanically and directly attached to the hose bib or faucet of a dysfunctional disabled domestic water distribution system without the use of tools.



Inventors:
Brewer Jr., Willard (Daphne, AL, US)
Application Number:
11/202395
Publication Date:
03/29/2007
Filing Date:
08/08/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
417/460
International Classes:
F04B53/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KOCZO JR, MICHAEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WILLARD BREWER JR. (DAPHNE, AL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A water pumping device that is hand operated and can be mechanically attached to the spigot of a private domestic water distribution system without the use of hand tools. an elongated tube body having a first end and a second end, a reciprocating piston received inside the elongated tube body, the piston together with the elongated tube body will define a tube body cavity, an enclosing end cap, securely and sealingly mounted and attached to the first end of the elongated tube body, the end cap having an air relief vent hole and a plunger shaft guide hole therein, a plunger shaft with a piston attached is inserted through the end cap guide hole to facilitate the attachment of a pump handle to the plunger shaft, a piston attached to the plunger shaft is smaller on the outside diameter than the inside diameter of the elongated tube body which will facilitate the free and easy reciprocating movement of the piston within the elongated tube body, a piston that has one wide surface and one narrow surface, the wide surface of the piston is attached to the plunger shaft and the narrow surface has an annulus ring cut into the surface to receive an annular sealing ring that will make an airtight seal between the piston and the inside surface of the elongated tube body, an airtight seal between the piston and the elongated tube body surface will permit an increase or decrease of pressure within the tube chamber as the piston reciprocates, the increase and decrease of pressure inside the tube chamber will cause an alternating siphon and discharging of the tube chamber contents, and alternately opening and closing the backflow valves, an elongated tube body having a second end containing two laterally extended diametrically opposed open ports, open ports that communicate the outside of pump with the inside of pump, ports permit water to be siphoned into the tube chamber through the inlet port and discharged out of the tube chamber through the outlet port, an elongated tube body having opposing open ports, each port having a backflow valve installed so that water does not backflow through either port, both valves will open and close alternately and the piston reciprocates with the tube chamber, both backflow valves are installed in the flow path of water with the opening and closing portion of the valve pointed down stream from the inlet open port a laterally extended inlet open port having a hand operated moveable attachment means to facilitate attaching the pump to a standard spigot, the moveable attachment means has a standard female hose thread and can be manipulated easily without the use of hand tools a laterally extended outlet open port having a threaded attachment means, the attachment means is a standard male hose thread that will facilitate the attachment of hoses to the pump.

2. A hand operated pumping device that can be used remotely, a pumping device having all the claims and aperture as in claim one. a foot rest attached to the bottom of pump to support the pump when the pump is in use remotely. a pumping device that can be used remotely by attaching a semi-rigid flexible hose (not shown), that will not implode into itself under negative pressure, to the inlet side of the pump and the other end of hose to any desired source, attach a discharge hose to the outlet side of the pump if desired to discharge the contents to any distant location. a hand operated pumping device using only the water contained inside the water distribution system source to restore a dysfunctional water pump, there is no need for supplemental water from an outside source. a hand operating pumping device is attached to the spigot of a water distribution system that has a dysfunctional water pump that has lost its prime, reciprocating the pump handle will siphon water from within the water distribution system source until water is restored to the dysfunctional pump, restoration of water to the pump restores the pumps prime and allows the pump to become operational without calling a plumber or using hand tools or supplemental water.

3. A pumping device that can be used as a pneumatic pumping device. a pumping device having all the apertures and claims in claim one, two and three. a pumping device when fitted with modified attachment means will perform such inflation task as inflating balls, tires and inflatable beach toys or inflatable camping equipment. a pumping device using modified attachment means will facilitate the inflation and deflation of any flexible, rigid containers or air bladders

Description:

The invention relates primarily to the need for potable water for human consumption. Since severe weather conditions create circumstances beyond human control, we find ourselves denied the use of such necessities as potable water. For example: during the time of severe weather conditions such as hurricanes, tornados, snowstorms and ice storms, there could be a disruption of electrical power. The lack of electrical power causes the water pump, a domestic water distribution system, to shut down and cease to function. When the water pump stops, there will not be any water available from the system. Since water is essential to life, the lack of water can cause serious threats to human and animal life. When a device is available to solve this problem, the device could be a life saving device for humans and animals, such as pets and farm animals.

The invention was developed and used to extract water from a dysfunctional domestic water distribution system. The invention is simple and easy to use. The invention is lightweight and can be used by anyone capable of reading and following the instructions.

The invention has many applications in different areas, such as marine, recreational, agriculture, and more specific plumbing. The invention is usable in most circumstances that require the evacuation or siphoning of free flowing liquids. The marine industry may use it for bilging. The agriculture industry could use it for evacuation, siphoning or filling liquid tanks from lakes or ponds. The invention could be used to supply emergency water for livestock animals. The invention can be used as a water pump for recreational vehicles and particularly any campsite near a stream or lake by attaching a hose of any length.

Plumbers will surely use the invention to restore the prime to dysfunctional domestic water pumps that have lost their prime. Plumbers will find the invention to be very useful, since no wrenches or reserve water are needed to restore an electrical water pump that has lost its prime. The plumber simply attaches the invention to the appropriate hose bib outlet and pull the handle and enough water will be siphoned into the pump to restore the prime.

SUMMARY

This invention is a hand operated water pump that can be attached directly to any standard domestic water distribution system hose bib outlet connection. The invention is used to siphon free flowing liquids from their source. Free flowing liquids can be water from a potable source such as a deep or shallow well, water and liquids not restrained under pressure. The invention is not recommended for use on municipal water systems. The invention is not recommended for liquids that may damage the pump. The invention is also capable of pumping air needed to inflate basket balls, soccer balls, car and bicycle tubes and any other devices containing an air bladder. Such an invention is a necessity when there is an emergency situation that demands water.

The invention may be constructed of any length and diameter using suitable material such as PVC or metal. The invention is a cylindrical tube capped on both ends. One end of the cylinder has a pumping handle installed. The end of the tube opposite the handle has one inlet side and one outlet side. The handle end of the cylinder has a metal rod, with a handle attached, and the rod is inserted through the end cap into the cavity of the cylinder. The end of the rod that has been inserted into the cylinder has been attached with a piston and a sealing ring embedded in the piston to help create suction or vacuum. A pull of the handle creates a vacuum inside the cylinder while a push of the handle creates a pressure in side the cylinder. To coordinate and relieve the pressures inside the cylinder that have been created during the pumping action, backflow check valves are installed to the inlet side and outlet side of the cylinder. Pulling handle out of the pump will close the outlet side backflow valve and open the inlets side backflow. Pulling the handle out creates a vacuum inside the cylinder and the vacuum is filled with a siphoned liquid until the handle is fully extended. When the cylinder is full of liquid it is time to discharge the liquid. Pushing the handle into the cylinder will close the inlet backflow valve and open the outlet backflow valve which allows the liquid to be discharged as the handle is pushed into the cylinder. Repeating the push and pull of the handle will continue the siphoning and discharging until the needed amount of liquid is accumulated.

DISCLOSURES

This document is to assert and make records of an idea for a device that may result in a patent from the United States Patent Office.

This idea is solely mine. This idea has not been the result of a conversation with another person. There has not been any material or financial support or input from another person under any circumstances. I have never seen such a device nor have I ever read any description of such device. I have never sold the device nor attempted to sell the device to another person.

This device has been shown in part to employees of the local hardware. The purpose for the showing this device was to demonstrate what parts I needed to purchase from that store. The two local hardware stores are the ACE Hardware and the Fairhope Hardware, both store are located in Fairhope, Ala. I demonstrated the function of this device as a prototype model at the home of William D. Fearno near the Christmas Tree farm located on state road #9 in Fairhope, Ala. I demonstrated the function of this device to a neighbor next door to Marthanne Meyers at 7541 Ridgeline Ct West, Mobile, Ala. I do not know the name of this person but I can describe him as large, gray hair suffering spinal surgery. The date of these two demonstrations was 4 Jan. 2003. I demonstrated the device to an employee at Olde Tyme Seeds on Greeno Rd. Fairhope, Ala.

While I was attempting to purchase parts at Rubber Hose of Mobile a representative of Irish & Associates overheard and listen to my conversation with a young tall employee of Rubber Hose of Mobile. The man was stocky build, blonde hair and wore kakki pants and green sweater. He asked a few questions about the device and the term “pd” which means “positive displacement” and I said I worked for a pump company and the date was 5 or 6 Jan. 2003. I could tell immediately he had knowledge about pumping devices.

The device is a hand operated pump. The pump is used to evacuate or siphon liquids using a hand operated pump. The basic principle is to create a vacuum sufficient to siphon a liquid from its source. The ideal use is for homeowners and plumbers to use when there is a dysfunctional water distribution pump, usually due to the lack of electricity. The device is best used for free flowing liquids such as free flowing water sources and shallow or deep wells that with dysfunctional water pumps. The device is not recommended for use with municipal water systems.

The operation of the device is simple. Attach the hose bib connector of the device to any standard plumbing hose bib outlet on a domestic water distribution system or free flowing water supply. A simple push and pull stroke of the device will create a siphon within the device to siphon water from its source and force it out through the outlet to any desire location. A garden hose may be connected to the outlet side to direct the liquid to a designated container any distance away from the device.

This is a description of flowing liquids through the device and explain the operation of the parts. After the device has been attached to a hose bib outlet connection of a water system you simply push or pull the handle of the device. A pull stroke of the device will open the back flow valve on the inlet side of the device and at the same time close the back flow valve on the outlet side. As the handle is pull out it will created a vacuum inside the device sufficient to pull enough water into the pump and equalized the negative pressure inside the pump. When the pressure is neutralized the inlet back flow valve will close. When the pump full of water it is time to discharge the water by pushing the handle inward. Pushing the handle inward will create a pressure inside the pump that will close the inlet back flow valve and open the outlet back flow valve. When the outlet back flow valve is open it allows the water to be discharged through the outlet side of the pump as the pump handle is pushed inward to a complete discharged. A continued push and pull of the handle will allow the pump to discharge as much water as is desired.

DESCRIPTION

A hand operated water pump comprised of an elongated tube body tube body with a plunger shaft inserted through a hole in the end cap that encloses the end thereof. The said plunger shaft has a piston attached with a slightly smaller outside diameter than the inside diameter of said tube body to enable easy movement of said piston within the said elongated tube body. The said tube body is elongated sufficient to hold water. The said plunger shaft has a handle attached to one end of said plunger shaft while the end opposite the said handle has a piston attached with an annular groove cut into said piston to receive an annular sealing ring. The use of said annular sealing ring creates an airtight seal between the said piston and inside wall surface of the said tube body. The said plunger shaft with said handle and said annular ring attached is inserted into said tube body through a hole in the said end cap. The end of said tube body opposite the enclosed end cap is equipped with two diametrically opposed laterally extended open ports. Each of the said open ports has a backflow valve that is inserted directly inside the flow path of water as the water passes through the said water pump. The first of the said open ports is the inlet side of said tube body. The said inlet side of said tube body is equipped with a standard thread female garden hose attachment means that is complete with a moveable locking mechanism to facilitate the physical attachment of said pump to a standard thread male garden hose bib outlet or spigot of a dysfunctional domestic water distribution system and other liquid sources. The said standard thread female garden hose attachment means is an integral part of the said tube body lateral open port. The second of said open ports of the said tube body is the said outlet side of said tube body. The said outlet side of said tube body is equipped with a standard male thread garden hose outlet that is an integral part of said tube body to facilitate the attachment of a garden hose to said tube body outlet when a garden hose is needed to direct the flow of the discharge water and liquids away from the said pump.

The said backflow valves are sensitive to pressure changes within the said tube body and the pressure changes will make said backflow valve either open or close alternately. The said inlet backflow valve is inserted directly within the inlet flow path of water while the said outlet backflow valve inserted directly within the outflow path of water. The said backflow valves will open and close alternately as pressure changes inside the said tube body. The pressure change inside said tube body is created by the movement of said plunger shaft in or out of said tube body. The out stroke of said plunger shaft will close the said outflow valve and decreasing the inside pressure of said tube body will open said inflow backflow valve devise and continue decreasing the pressure inside said tube body sufficient to siphon water from a dysfunctional domestic water distribution system or other liquids from their sources into the said tube body. The in stroke of said plunger shaft will increase pressure inside said tube body sufficient to close the said inlet backflow valve and increase the pressure inside the said tube body sufficient to open the said outflow valve device. The continued in stroke of said plunger shaft will discharge water or liquid from said pump. Repeating the in and out stroke of said plunger shaft will continue to discharge water or liquid until the desired amount of accumulation is acquired. The pump is equipped with a foot rest attached on the second end of the pump opposite the handle end to stabilize the pump during remote use.

BACKGROUND

The prior art in pumps is prolific in patents that disclose various types of air and fluid pumps that claim numerous unique features and configurations. Some of the most pertinent researched patents of prior art are patent numbers U.S. Pat. No. 6,497,560 B2 issued Dec. 24, 2002; U.S. Pat. No. 6,499,974 issued Dec. 31, 2002; U.S. Pat. No. 1,414,463 issued May 2, 1922; U.S. Pat. No. 2,557,139 issued Jun. 19, 1951; U.S. Pat. No. 5,230,611 issued Jul. 7, 1993; U.S. Pat. No. 4,975,028 issued Dec. 4, 1990; and U.S. Pat. No. 2,462,980 issued Mar. 1,1949.

The use of hand pumps of various designs and configuration for pumping air into or out of inflatable objects are well established in prior art. Despite numerous designs and configurations that have been developed by prior art the basic principal remains constant, useful and limitless for developing new ideas. New technologies and present day materials make possible new methods of development, construction and manufacturing new pumping apparatus for present day use. This proposed pump is the result of these new technologies, materials and manufacturing processes based on new ideas. While many patents disclose pumps for evacuating and inflating air into objects, most of the prior art pumps are based on the familiar bicycle type pump. The fluid pump configuration patented by P. M. Grant, U.S. Pat. No. 1,414,463 issued May 2, 1922, is made to Grants idea to make it more useful, easier to use and more diverse in an emergency situation. These improvements are embodied in the proposed pump making the pump more useful and diverse in an emergency situation. Grants pump has one side port slip joint fitting making the joint generic at best. The side port opposite the slip joint fitting is a smooth open port making the smooth open port useless for attachments. The proposed pump is significant improvement over Grants pump in that it has a mechanical attachment means on both the inlet side open port and outlet side open port which makes the pump better suited for the intended purpose of the pump and that purpose is to be able to attach the proposed pump directly to a hose bib or spigot of a domestic water distribution system without the use of hand tools and makes the proposed pump an integral part of the water distribution system. The improvements to Grants pump are embodied in the proposed pump making the proposed pump more useful and easier to use in an emergency situation.

The proposed pump is simplicity in design, constructed of non-corrosive materials and functionality are significant improvements over prior art. The most novel feature of the proposed pump, which is the primary claim for a patent, is that it has a hand operated moveable female attachment means which allows the pump to be directly attached to the hose bib or faucet of a disabled domestic water distribution system without the use of hand tools and the pump becomes an integral part of the domestic water distribution system.

Another prior art pump is U.S. Pat. No. 4,975,028 issued Dec. 4, 1990 to Glen R. Shultz. The Shultz pump does have an attachment means that may be considered mechanical attachment; even though it is a slip joint fitting. However, this attachment means also is not specific enough in its method of attachment and is generic in use and does not have a true specific mechanical threaded attachment means for inlet or outlet purposes as in the proposed pump.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,462,980 issued to S. W. Litt on Mar. 1, 1949 is a prior art fluid pump. The pumps patented to Grant and Litt are difficult to use because of their design using to many parts interiorly and exteriorly and do not mechanically attach directly to the object to be inflated, deflated or pump water. The Litt and Grant pumps are mechanically elaborate in their use and functionality while the proposed pump is the simplest form of mechanical use and functionality.

The proposed pump has both male and female standard hose thread attachment means that are an integral part of the pump. The moveable female attachment means permits the pump to be attached directly and mechanically to a standard thread male hose outlet or standard thread female hose outlet. A regular garden hose may be attached to the male side of the pump when necessary to direct the flow of discharge to any desire distant location. A regular semi-rigid flexible hose can be attached to the female side of the side of the pump when necessary to direct the flow of discharge to any desire distant location. A regular semi-rigid flexible hose can be attached to the female side of the pump when the pump is to be used remotely.

The inventor has found that when this pump is used for air or water needs it is extremely effective and useful in emergencies situations such as hurricane or tornado damaged areas that resulted in the loss of electrical power which may disables the water pump of a domestic water distribution system. P. M. Grants U.S. Pat. No. 1,414,463 was issued May 2, 1922 is excellent prior art showing a similar basic design for pumping fluids. However, the proposed pump ,with its novel feature is an improvement over prior art patent by Grant.

New technology, materials and manufacturing processes have allowed the inventor to make a more useful, efficient, maintenance free and durable pump that will not corrode. The proposed pump can be manufacture by using off the shelf PVC polyvinyl chloride parts and assembled at room temperature using air drying adhesives.

The most novel feature of the new pump, that is not demonstrated as a part of any prior art, is that it can be physically and mechanically attached to a spigot and become an integral part of a disabled private domestic water distribution system. The pump is hand operated and can be used to extract water from a disabled private domestic water distribution system or other unrestricted water sources without the use of electrical power.

References to prior art:

U.S. Pat. No. 6497560 B2Robert T. CarlsonDec. 24, 2002
1414463P. M. GrantMay 2, 1992
2557139G. E. Peter ET ALJun. 19, 1951
5230611Billy R. SheltonJul. 7, 1993
4975028Glen R. ShultzMar. 1 1949

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 Overall view

FIG. 1A Longitudinal view showing the cross section of all parts

FIG. 2 Backflow check valve “open”

FIG. 3 Backflow check valve “closed”

FIG. 4 Overhead view

FIG. 5 Modified adapter attachment means to convert pump from water to pneumatic inflation or deflation.

FIG. 6 Inflation attachment to be connected to the modified adapter when using pump for inflation or deflation of auto tires, bicycle tires and recreation balls or other bladders.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to the drawings and initially to FIG. 1a of a pumping device for extracting water from a disabled private water distribution system. The pump has an elongated tube body (24) with a tube body cavity (39) therein, and an enclosed end cap (25). Said end cap (25), having a guide hole (27) and an air relief vent hole (26) therein, to enclose one end of said elongated tube body (24). A plunger shaft (28) is inserted through the said guide hole(27) in the said enclosed end cap (25) into the said tube cavity (39). Said plunger shaft (28) has a pump handle (29) attached to one end of said plunger shaft (28) and opposite the said handle (29) of said plunger shaft (28) a piston (23) is attached. Said piston (23) has an annulus groove (30) cut into the said piston (23) to receive an annular sealing device (31). Said annular sealing device (31) creates an airtight seal between the said piston (23) and the inside wall of said elongated tube body (24). The second end of said elongated tube body (24) opposite the said enclosed end cap (25), has two laterally extended open ports; an inlet open port (32) and an outlet open port (33) and both ports communicate the outside of said pump with the inside tube body cavity (39), of said elongated tube body (24). Said lateral extended open port inlet (32) has a threaded female moveable locking attachment means (35). The said threaded female moveable locking attachment means (35) has a standard female hose thread attachment means (36) to permit the attachment of said pump directly to spigot or hose bib (not shown). Said lateral extended open port outflow outlet (33) has a standard male hose threaded attachment means (37) to allow attachment of a garden hose to the pump which directs the flow of discharged water to another location. Said lateral open port inlet opening (32) has an inflow backflow valve (41) installed directly into water flow path (40). Said lateral extended open port outflow outlet (33) has a backflow valve (38) inserted directly into said water flow path (40). The inlet backflow valve (41) and outflow backflow valve (38) are installed so that they will open and close alternately when the pressure within said tube body cavity (39) changes as a result of any movement inward and outward of said plunger shaft (28). The outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will create a vacuum within the said tube body cavity (39) strong enough to extract water from its source. The outward movement of said plunger shaft (28 )will cause the said outflow backflow valve (38) to close, FIG. 3, and at the same time open the inflow backflow valve (41), FIG. 2, and siphon water into said tube body cavity (39) through said lateral open port inlet opening (32) and the inflow backflow valve (41) will remain open until the outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) stops, filling the said tube body cavity (39) with water. The inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will create a pressure within the said tube body cavity (39) strong enough to close inflow backflow valve (41) and open said outflow backflow valve (38) and force water out of the said tube body cavity (39) through the lateral open port outlet (33). The inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will close the said inflow backflow valve (41) and open the said outflow backflow valve (38) and the out flow backflow valve (38) will remain open until the movement of said plunger shaft (28) stops; and the continued inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will discharge the remaining water within the tube body cavity (39). Repeating the inward and outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will discharge water until the desired amount is accumulated. The pump is equipped with a foot rest (34) to help anchor and stabilize the pump when the pump is used remotely.

Reference patents:

1414463issued to P. M. Grant 2 May 1922
4975028issued to Glen R. Shultz 4 Dec. 1990
2462980issued to S. W. Litt 1 Mar. 1949
2557139issued to G. E. Peters et al19 Jun. 1947
5230611issued to Billy R. Shelton27 Jul. 1993
U.S. Pat. No. 6499974 B2Issued to Bjorn Bach31 Dec. 2002
U.S. Pat. No. 6497560 B2issued to Robert T. Carlson24 Dec. 2002

How to Construct a Hurricane Pump

In order to construct a Hurricane Pump you will need the following materials: 1—suitable pump handle, your choice; 1-¼×18 inch metal rod threaded on both ends approximately 1½ thread length; 2—¼ flat metal washers; 2—⅜ hex nuts; 1—¾ inch diameter double action rubber suction cups that will fit snuggly in side the ¾ inch dia. tube; 1—¾ inch diameter×16 inch long pvc pipe; 1—¾ pvc “T” fitting; 1—¾ inch pvc end cap; 2—¾ inch×1½ inch long pvc pipe; 1—¾ inch female slip joint hose bib connector; 1—¾ inch slip joint male hose bib connector; 2—suitable backflow check valves, check valves must fit inside a ¾ inch diameter pvc pipe.

NOTE: The double suction cup can be made using two brake cylinder cups installed in opposite direction to each other. Using this method for suction is a substitute for the making of an expensive piston with an annular groove and annular ring installed on the piston

Assembly

Drill a 5/16 inch diameter hole in the center of the end cap. Attach the handle to the metal rod. Insert the rod through the hole in the end cap. The end of rod opposite the handle attach the piston assembly by installing one hex nut and a flat washer, next insert the rod through the suction cup by drilling a suitable hole in the center of cup. Add the other flat washer and secure in place by attaching the remaining hex nut. Tighten the hex nuts just slightly snug; to tight and the suction cup will distort. Lubricate the inside of the 16 inch pvc pipe with cooking oil and insert the piston and rod-handle assembly into the pipe, and slip the end cap onto the pipe for a snug fit. Do not glue this joint. Insert the 16 inch pipe, with the piston installed, into the right angle side opening of the pvc “T” fitting and glue in place. Install both the remaining ¾×1½ inch pvc pipe into the opposing ends of the “T” fitting and glue into place. Install the backflow check valves into the ends of the ¾ inch pvc pipes before installing the slip fittings. It is very important to install the backflow check valves correctly. When installing the backflow check valve next to the female hose bib connector, the inlet side, be sure the valve will open when pressure inside the pumps is decreased. Proper installation of the backflow check valve will insure that the valve will open when the pump handle is pulled out to siphon liquid from its source. The backflow check valve installed in outlet side must open when pressure is applied to it by pushing the handle in order to discharge the liquid. When the valves are installed correctly the inlet valve will open on the pull stroke while the outlet valve is closed; and the outlet valve will be closed when the inlet valve is open. Pushing the handle in will close the inlet valve and open the outlet valve. When you are sure the valves are installed correctly apply glue to the joints to ensure the stability of the connectors and the check valves. Be sure you have connected the female hose bib connector to the inlet side of the pump and the male hose outlet to the outlet side of the pump. When assembly is completed it is time to test the pump.

Testing the pump is simple. Attach the female hose bib connector side of pump to a standard domestic water distribution hose bib outlet. Attach, snuggly, tight to prevent air from infiltrating in to the pump while pulling the handle out. You may use the push and pull stroke until the water is pulled from its source and discharged on the outlet side of the pump. It will take several strokes of the handle to discharge water, depending on how far the water source may be siphoned.

Operating Instructions

1. Take the pump out of the box and investigate pump for damage.

Make sure the handle will go in and out freely.

2. Make sure the pump handle is pushed inward as far as it will go.

Attached the pump to a standard hose bib connection on the water supply system by using the hose bib connector on the inlet side of the pump. Turn the hose bib connector clockwise until hand tightened. Do not use a mechanical tool to tighten the connector, it will damage the connector, hand tighten only. It is a good idea, using the hand, to support the pump body during the stroking procedure.

2. After the connection is made to the water supply system open the water supply valve to allow the pump access to the water supply in the system. Using a push and pull stroke of the pump handle will siphon water from the water supply. The number of strokes of the pump to achieve water will depend on the location of the water supply to the pump connection. Several strokes will be needed.

3. It is absolutely essential that there not be any air leaks in the water supply system. Air leaks will prevent the proper function of the pump. Be sure to close “tight” all water system valves. Kitchen and bath valves must be closed tight. Be sure the commode or water closet valve can not allow air to enter the water supply system when attempting to use the pump.

4. When the desire amount of water has been accumulated you may disconnect the pump. Close the water supply system valve that was open to allow access to the water source. Disconnect the pump from the connection by turning the hose bib connector counterclockwise until it is disconnected.

5. The Hurricane Emergency Pump can be used to restore the prime to a dysfunctional electric water pump. Be sure the electricity to the water pump is disconnected or switched off. Attach the Hurricane Emergency Pump to the water supply system as close as possible to the disabled electrical water pump. Be sure the Hurricane Emergency Pump is attached to a faucet downstream from the disabled water pump. Open the faucet valve, using the push and pull strokes of the Hurricane Emergency Pump handle will restore water to the disabled pump when water is discharge from the outlet side of the Hurricane Pump. Close the faucet valve and restore the electricity to the water pump. If prime is not restore repeat the process. Disconnect the Hurricane Emergency Pump and store in a safe and protected area near the water distribution system.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to the drawings and initially to FIG. 1a of a pumping device for extracting water from a disabled private water distribution system. The pump has an elongated tube body (24) with a tube body cavity (39) therein, and an enclosed end cap (25). Said end cap (25), having a guide hole (27) and an air relief vent hole (26) therein, to enclose one end of said elongated tube body (24). A plunger shaft (28) is inserted through the said guide hole(27) in the said enclosed end cap (25) into the said tube cavity (39). Said plunger shaft (28) has a pump handle (29) attached to one end of said plunger shaft (28) and opposite the said handle (29) of said plunger shaft (28) a piston (23) is attached. Said piston (23) has an annulus groove (30) cut into the said piston (23) to receive an annular sealing device (31). Said annular sealing device (31) creates an airtight seal between the said piston (23) and the inside wall of said elongated tube body (24). The second end of said elongated tube body (24) opposite the said enclosed end cap (25), has two laterally extended open ports; an inlet open port (32) and an outlet open port (33) and both ports communicate the outside of said pump with the inside tube body cavity (39), of said elongated tube body (24). Said lateral extended open port inlet (32) has a threaded female moveable locking attachment means (35). The said threaded female moveable locking attachment means (35) has a standard female hose thread attachment means (36) to permit the attachment of said pump directly to spigot or hose bib (not shown). Said lateral extended open port outflow outlet (33) has a standard male hose threaded attachment means (37) to allow attachment of a garden hose to the pump which directs the flow of discharged water to another location. Said lateral open port inlet opening (32) has an inflow backflow valve (41) installed directly into water flow path (40). Said lateral extended open port outflow outlet (33) has a backflow valve (38) inserted directly into said water flow path (40). The inlet backflow valve (41) and outflow backflow valve (38) are installed so that they will open and close alternately when the pressure within said tube body cavity (39) changes as a result of any movement inward and outward of said plunger shaft (28). The outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will create a vacuum within the said tube body cavity (39) strong enough to extract water from its source. The outward movement of said plunger shaft (28 ) will cause the said outflow backflow valve (38) to close, FIG. 3, and at the same time open the inflow backflow valve (41), FIG. 2, and siphon water into said tube body cavity (39) through said lateral open port inlet opening (32) and the inflow backflow valve (41) will remain open until the outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) stops, filling the said tube body cavity (39) with water. The inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will create a pressure within the said tube body cavity (39) strong enough to close inflow backflow valve (41) and open said outflow backflow valve (38) and force water out of the said tube body cavity (39) through the lateral open port outlet (33). The inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will close the said inflow backflow valve (41) and open the said outflow backflow valve (38) and the out flow backflow valve (38) will remain open until the movement of said plunger shaft (28) stops; and the continued inward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will discharge the remaining water within the tube body cavity (39). Repeating the inward and outward movement of said plunger shaft (28) will discharge water until the desired amount is accumulated. The pump is equipped with a foot rest (34) to help anchor and stabilize the pump when the pump is used remotely.

Reference patents:

1414463issued to P. M. Grant 2 May 1922
4975028issued to Glen R. Shultz 4 Dec. 1990
2462980issued to S. W. Litt 1 Mar. 1949
2557139issued to G. E. Peters et al19 Jun. 1947
5230611issued to Billy R. Shelton27 Jul. 1993
U.S. Pat. No. 6499974 B2Issued to Bjorn Bach31 Dec. 2002
U.S. Pat. No. 6497560 B2issued to Robert T. Carlson24 Dec. 2002