Title:
Architectural interleaf for shingle roof
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An interleaf for creating a visible roof feature. The interleaf has a first surface defining a first side. The interleaf has a second surface defining a second side. The interleaf has one or more contact points which define a third side of the interleaf. The third side of the interleaf defines a second acute angle with the second surface and a first angle with the first side. The first surface of the interleaf is visible when the interleaf is placed between two or more courses of shingles on a roof and the third side contacts a portion of a shingle.



Inventors:
Maurer, Scott D. (Rocky River, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/234735
Publication Date:
03/29/2007
Filing Date:
09/26/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/90.1
International Classes:
E04B7/02; E04D1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
AHMAD, CHARISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FAY SHARPE LLP (Cleveland, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An interleaf for creating a visible roof feature comprising: a first surface defining a first side; a second surface defining a second side; and one or more contact points which define a third side of the interleaf, the third side of the interleaf defining a second acute angle with the second surface and a first angle with the first side; wherein the first surface of the interleaf is visible when the interleaf is placed between two or more courses of shingles on a roof and the third side contacts a portion of a shingle.

2. The interleaf of claim 1 wherein the third side is notched.

3. The interleaf of claim 1 wherein the second acute angle is within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees.

4. The interleaf of claim 1 wherein the interleaf includes a generally wide portion and a generally narrow portion.

5. The interleaf of claim 4 wherein the first surface is located at the generally wide portion of the interleaf.

6. The interleaf of claim 1 further comprising a generally squared end wherein the generally squared end includes the first surface.

7. The interleaf of claim 1 further comprising a generally sloped end wherein the generally sloped end is the first surface.

8. The interleaf of claim 1 further comprising a generally rounded end wherein the generally rounded end is the first surface.

9. The interleaf of claim 1 wherein the third side is layered.

10. The interleaf of claim 9 wherein the second acute angle is within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees.

11. An interleaf for creating a visible roof feature comprising: a narrow portion and a wide portion; and a first surface located at the generally wide portion of the interleaf; wherein the wide portion of the interleaf tapers toward the narrow portion of the interleaf.

12. The interleaf of claim 11 further comprising a squared end wherein the squared end includes the first surface.

13. The interleaf of claim 11 further comprising a sloped end wherein the sloped end is the first surface.

14. The interleaf of claim 11 further comprising a rounded end wherein the rounded end is the first surface.

15. A decorative accessory for a roof comprising: a head having a first surface and a second surface defining an acute angle with the first surface; and a body operatively connected to the head, wherein the body is adapted to be generally positioned between a shingle and an interleaf and the head generally protrudes from the interleaf.

16. The decorative accessory of claim 15 wherein the first surface includes a generally planar surface.

17. The decorative accessory of claim 15 wherein the first surface is generally concave.

18. The decorative accessory of claim 15 wherein the first surface is generally convex.

19. The decorative accessory of claim 15 wherein the interleaf includes a generally narrow portion and a generally wide portion.

20. The decorative accessory of claim 19 wherein the narrow portion defines an acute angle within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A residential and commercial roof generally serves utilitarian functions for building structures. The roof serves to keep moisture out of the structure and control the climate inside. The materials selected for construction of the external surfaces of the roof were likewise generally utilitarian. Tile, slate, wood, composite materials, and the like have traditionally been selected for roof construction due to concerns of cost and durability. The aesthetic properties of roof construction materials have generally taken a back seat.

Roofing products can be classified in three basic groups: shingles, roll roofing and underlayment. Shingles and roll roofing are typically outer roof coverings designed to withstand exposure to weather and the elements. In a typical roof installation, the underlayment is first laid on top of the roof deck, and then the outer roofing covering (e.g., shingles or roll roofing) is attached on top of the underlayment.

Asphalt, or “composite” shingles are a commonly used roofing material. Asphalt shingles may include an organic felt or fiberglass mat base on which an asphalt coating is applied. The organic felt or fiberglass mat base gives the asphalt shingle the strength while the asphalt coating provides resistance to weathering. An outer layer of mineral granules may also be applied to the asphalt coating to form a weather surface which shields the asphalt coating from the sun and provides additional fire resistance.

Composite shingles are typically manufactured as three tab shingles, laminated shingles, interlocking shingles, or large individual shingles. Even though composite shingles offer significant cost, service life, and fire resistance advantages, wood shingles are sometimes preferred due to pleasing aesthetic features, such as greater thickness as compared to composite shingles. Wood shingles may result in a layered look for a roof. Various composite shingles have been developed to provide an appearance of thickness comparable to wood shingles.

Roofs having composite shingles frequently have a dull or otherwise unpleasing appearance. Roofs are typically void of attention to architecturally appealing features. Current attempts to make roofs better looking and more interesting have been largely unsuccessful. There remains a long-felt need for a suitable means of creating a roof with an interesting appearance.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a series of interleafs in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a series of layered interleafs in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a series of relieved interleafs in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an interleaf of FIG. 1 placed between two courses of shingles on a roof.

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of an interleaf of FIG. 1 placed between two courses of shingles on a roof.

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view in elevation of an interleaf with a generally squared edge.

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view in elevation of an interleaf with a generally sloped edge.

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view in elevation of an interleaf with a generally rounded edge.

FIG. 9 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a slanted decorative accessory with an interleaf having a generally squared edge.

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a convex rounded decorative accessory with an interleaf having a generally squared edge.

FIG. 11 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a concave rounded decorative accessory with an interleaf having a generally squared edge.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view in elevation of a series of interleafs stacked together.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view in elevation of a series of interleafs rolled together.

FIG. 14 is a cross sectional view in elevation of a series of interleafs rolled together viewed along A-A of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is an elevational view of a structure without the interleaf in the roof.

FIG. 16 is an elevational view of a structure with the interleaf in the roof.

FIG. 17 is an elevational view of the interleaf of FIG. 2 placed between two courses of shingles on a roof.

FIG. 18 is an elevational view of the interleaf of FIG. 3 placed between two courses of shingles on a roof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Preliminarily, it should be noted that certain terms used herein, such as for example above, below, upper, lower left and right, are used to facilitate the description of the invention. Unless otherwise specified or made apparent by the context of the discussion, such terms and other directional terms should be interpreted with reference to the figure(s) under discussion. Such terms are not intended as a limitation on the position in which the invention or components may be used. Indeed, it is contemplated that the components of the invention may be easily positioned in any desired orientation for use. Likewise, numerical terms such as for example “first”, and “second” are not intended as a limitation or to imply a sequence, unless otherwise specified or made apparent by the context of the discussion. The term “operatively connected” is understood to include a linking together of the portions under consideration and may include a physical engagement and/or a functional or operational connection.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 16 an interleaf, indicated generally at 20, according to the invention. The term “roof” may be understood to include an upper covering of a building. The term “interleaf” may be understood to include a device positioned generally between two or more shingles or other roof coverings on a roof. The term “shingle” may be understood to include a generally flat structure used to cover a roof. Shingles may be used in generally overlapping rows, or courses—or in any other suitable fashion.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 through 5, the interleaf 20 is shown positioned between an illustrated upper course 25 of shingles and an illustrated lower course 30 of shingles. Any of the interleafs shown in this application may be generally positioned as is the interleaf 20 shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The upper course 25 includes a series of shingles positioned generally on top of the interleaf 20. The lower course 30 includes a series of shingles positioned generally below the interleaf 20. Each shingle shown includes a headlap portion 35 and a tab portion 40. It will be appreciated for the upper course 25 and lower course 30 shown, that the interleaf 20 is secured to the under surface of the tab portion 40 of the upper course 25 and the upper surface headlap portion 35 of the lower course 30. The interleaf 20 may be secured with any suitable adhesive, fastener or the like.

The interleaf may have any suitable length, width, and/or thickness. It will be appreciated that the illustrated interleaf 20 has a length L1 which is about the same as the sum of the length L2 of the tab portion 40 plus the length L3 of the headlap portion 35. In other words, for the interleaf 20 shown, L1=L2+L3. The length of the interleaf 20 may be lesser or greater than the length of a single shingle. It may be a multiple of the length of a single shingle or any suitable proportion or multiple thereof. The interleaf 20 shown has a thickness T1 at the exposed portion of the interleaf 20.

Referring to FIG. 1, it will be noted that the length of the interleaf 20 can vary as desired. FIG. 1 shows a plurality of interleafs 20a, b, c, d, e, f, g of varying lengths. For purposes of clarity in this application, the interleaf will be referred to with the single reference number 20. It will be understood that any suitable interleaf may be employed as desired—even though only the single reference number 20 is used. Referring primarily to FIG. 1, the illustrated interleaf 20 includes a first surface 50 (a first side) a second surface 55 (a second side) and a third surface 60 (a third side). The first surface 50 and the third surface 60 define an angle A1. The third surface 60 and the second surface 55 define an angle A2. The first surface 50 and the second surface 55 and the third surface 60 are generally adjacent to each other. The term “adjacent” is understood to include structures or components generally near or generally close to each other.

For the illustrated interleaf 20, the angle A2 is an acute angle within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees. The angle A2 is located at a relatively narrow edge of the interleaf 20. The angle A1 is located at the relatively wide edge of the interleaf 20. The first surface 50 is preferably that portion of the interleaf 20 that is most visible when the interleaf 20 is installed—as shown on FIG. 16. The first surface 50 is located at the relatively wide edge of the interleaf 20.

Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, it will be appreciated that the illustrated first surface 50 is generally aligned with the downward most portion of the shingle. Any suitable alignment may be employed. The downward most portion of the shingle is that portion of the shingle that is generally closest to the ground (not shown) or foundation of the structure on which the shingle is positioned. The tab portion 40 of the shingle is generally raised by the interleaf 20 underneath, thereby allowing the first surface 50 of the interleaf 20 to be visible. The illustrated tab portion 40 of the shingle generally terminates to generally align with the visible first surface 50 of the interleaf 20 as shown. Any suitable alignment may be employed.

Referring to FIG. 2, a series of laminated (or layered) interleafs 70 of varying lengths are shown. FIG. 2 shows a plurality of interleafs 70a, b, c, d, e, f, g of varying lengths. For purposes of clarity in this application, the interleaf may be referred to with a single reference number. It will be understood that any suitable interleaf may be employed as desired—even though only the single reference number is used. It will be appreciated that the interleafs of FIG. 2 may be readily substituted with and/or used in conjunction with the interleafs of FIGS. 1 and/or 3.

Each illustrated interleaf 70 includes a first surface 75 (a first side), a second surface 80 (a second side), and a third side 85. The illustrated third side 85 is a generally stepped side of the interleaf 70. The interleaf 70 is generally tapered. The term “tapered” may be understood to include a structure which becomes generally relatively narrower at one end and/or generally relatively smaller in size or amount. The interleaf 70 generally tapers to an acute angle within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees.

Referring to FIG. 3, a series of relieved (or notched) interleafs 90 of varying lengths are shown. The term “notched” is understood to include structures or components generally having an indentation therein. FIG. 3 shows a plurality of notched interleafs 90a, b, c, d, e, f, g of varying lengths. For purposes of clarity in this application, the interleaf may be referred to with a single reference number. It will be understood that any suitable interleaf may be employed as desired—even though only the single reference number is used. It will be appreciated that the interleafs of FIG. 3 may be readily substituted with and/or used in conjunction with the interleafs of FIGS. 1 and/or 2.

Each illustrated interleaf 9 includes a first surface 95 (a first side), a second surface 100 (a second side), and a third side 105. The illustrated third side 105 is a generally notched side of the interleaf 90. The interleaf 90 is generally tapered. The interleaf 90 generally tapers to an acute angle within the range of from about one degree to about ten degrees.

Referring to FIG. 6 the interleaf 20 may include a generally squared end 110. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the generally squared end 110 as desired. The generally squared end 110 may be employed as the generally relatively wider end of the interleaf 20. The generally squared end 110 is preferably that portion of the interleaf 20 that is most visible when the interleaf 20 is installed—as shown on FIG. 16.

Referring to FIG. 7 the interleaf 20 may include a generally sloped end 115. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the generally sloped end 115 as desired. The generally sloped end 115 may be employed as the generally relatively wider end of the interleaf 20. The generally sloped end 115 is preferably that portion of the interleaf 20 that is most visible when the interleaf 20 is installed—as shown on FIG. 16.

Referring to FIG. 8 the interleaf 20 may include a generally rounded end 120. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the generally rounded end 120 as desired. The generally rounded end 120 may be employed as the generally relatively wider end of the interleaf 20. The generally rounded end 120 is preferably that portion of the interleaf 20 that is most visible when the interleaf 20 is installed—as shown on FIG. 16. The generally rounded end 120 may be generally concave, generally convex, or any other suitable generally rounded shape.

Referring to FIG. 9, a decorative accessory 130 may also be employed with the interleaf 20. It will be appreciated that, when installed, the decorative accessory 130 generally hides and/or obscures the first surface 50 of the interleaf 20. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the optional decorative accessory. The decorative accessory 130 is shown with the interleaf 20 having the generally squared end 110, though may be employed with any suitable interleaf. The term “accessory” is understood to include a part or component that may be fitted to and/or with something to perform an additional function or enhance performance and/or appearance. The term “head” is understood to include a projecting part of an object. The term “body” is understood to include a mass of matter generally distinct from other masses. These definitions are provided solely to facilitate an understanding of the invention—not to limit the invention.

The illustrated decorative accessory 130 includes a head 135 and a body 140. The illustrated head 135 for the decorative accessory 130 includes a first surface 145 and a second surface 150. The illustrated first surface 145 and the illustrated second surface 150 define an angle A3. The illustrated angle A3 is an acute angle. The first surface 145 may be generally planar, as shown. The second surface 150 may be generally planar, as shown. The illustrated head 135 of the decorative accessory 130 is generally planar. The body 140 of the decorative accessory 130 is shown generally between the tab portion 40 of the shingle and the interleaf 20. The head 135 and the body 140 may be integrally formed or may be separate components.

Referring to FIG. 10, a decorative accessory 230 may also be employed with the interleaf 20. It will be appreciated that, when installed, the decorative accessory 230 generally hides and/or obscures the first surface 50 of the interleaf 20. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the optional decorative accessory. The decorative accessory 230 is shown with the interleaf 20 having the generally squared end 110, though may be employed with any suitable interleaf.

The illustrated decorative accessory 230 includes a head 235 and a body 240. The illustrated head 235 for the decorative accessory 230 includes a first surface 245 and a second surface 250. The illustrated first surface 245 and the illustrated second surface 250 define an angle A4. The illustrated angle A4 is an acute angle. The first surface 245 may be generally planar, as shown. The second surface 250 may be generally planar, as shown. The illustrated head 235 of the decorative accessory 230 is generally rounded and convex. The body 240 of the decorative accessory 230 is shown generally between the tab portion 40 of the shingle and the interleaf 20. The head 235 and the body 240 may be integrally formed or may be separate components.

Referring to FIG. 11, a decorative accessory 330 may also be employed with the interleaf 20. It will be appreciated that, when installed, the decorative accessory 330 generally hides and/or obscures the first surface 50 of the interleaf 20. The interleaf 70 of FIG. 2 and interleaf 90 of FIG. 3 may likewise include the optional decorative accessory. The decorative accessory 330 is shown with the interleaf 20 having the generally squared end 110, though may be employed with any suitable interleaf.

The illustrated decorative accessory 330 includes a head 335 and a body 340. The illustrated head 335 for the decorative accessory 330 includes a first surface 345 and a second surface 350. The illustrated first surface 345 and the illustrated second surface 350 define an angle A5. The illustrated angle A5 is an acute angle. The first surface 345 may be generally planar, as shown. The second surface 350 may be generally planar, as shown. The illustrated head 335 of the decorative accessory 330 is generally rounded and concave. The body 340 of the decorative accessory 330 is shown generally between the tab portion 40 of the shingle and the interleaf 20. The head 335 and the body 340 may be integrally formed or may be separate components.

It will be appreciated that the head of the decorative accessory 130, 230, 330 generally protrudes from the interleaf. The term “protrude” is understood to include situations where something is caused to project and/or to jut out from the surrounding surface or context and/or to stick out from or through something. It will also be appreciated that the body of the accessory 130, 230, 330 is generally positioned between the shingle and the interleaf. The decorative accessory 130, 230, 330 may be made of any suitable material and may be colored and/or reflective as desired.

Referring now to FIGS. 12, 13, and 14, the interleaf 20 may be packaged and/or stored in a number of suitable ways. For example, the interleaf 20 may be stacked. FIG. 12 shows the wider end 160 of the interleaf 20 alternating of the narrower end 165 of the interleaf 20, allowing a plurality of the interleafs 20 to be stacked generally vertically as shown. FIGS. 13, and 14 show that interleafs 20 may be generally stacked and processed into a roll 170 for convenient packaging as shown.

In use, the interleaf 20 may include an adhesive strip on one or both of the upper and lower surfaces. Proper installation of the interleaf will generally resist wind uplift. The adhesive strip may be any suitable chemical or composition. The adhesive strip may be generally positioned between the interleaf 20 and the roofing surface and/or roofing product positioned on top of the interleaf 20. The adhesive strip may be generally positioned between the interleaf 20 and the roofing surface and/or roofing product positioned below the interleaf 20.

The interleaf 20 and the decorative accessory may be made from any suitable material and by any suitable method. The materials may be generally water resistant, generally compression resistant, generally resistant to ultraviolet exposure, and generally temperature resistant. The parameters for temperature resistance are generally within the range of from about −75 degrees Fahrenheit to about 225 degrees Fahrenheit. The invention may be adapted to fit a wide variety of uses. It will be appreciated that the components of the invention may be easily modified as needed to accommodate varying sizes and shapes.

Referring now to FIGS. 15 and 16, it will be appreciated that the invention improves the appearance of the roof. The generally horizontal darker lines on the roof of FIG. 16 enhance the appearance of the roof of FIG. 16 in comparison to the roof of FIG. 15. The interleaf 20 provides a decorative edge. The first surface 50 of the interleaf 20 is visible. The decorative accessory 130, 230, 330 may also be employed with the interleaf 20 to further enhance the appearance of the roof. The decorative accessory 130, 230, 330 may be used on each of the generally darker lines on the roof—or alternating lines or the like.

It will be appreciated that the interleaf may include one or more contact points. A contact point may be understood to include a terminal part or portion of the interleaf that creates a union or junction of surfaces. For the interleaf 20 of FIG. 1, the contact point includes the third surface 60. The third surface 60 is a third side of the interleaf 20. In use, the third surface 60 may be the downward most facing surface and/or side of the interleaf 20. The interleafs 70 of FIG. 2 include a number of contact points 71, as shown. The contact points 71 define a third side of the interleafs 70. The interleafs 90 of FIG. 3 include a number of contact points 91, as shown. The contact points 91 define a third side of the interface of the interleafs 90. The interleafs 20, 70, 90 includes a generally thicker end that tapers to a generally thinner end. The term “taper” may be understood to include a generally gradual diminution of thickness, diameter, and/or width of an object.

Referring to FIG. 17, it will be appreciated that the illustrated first surface 50 is shown generally aligned with the downward most portion of the lowermost overlying shingle. Any suitable alignment may be employed. The tab portion 40 of the shingle is generally raised by the interleaf 70 underneath, thereby allowing the first surface 50 of the interleaf 70 to be visible. The illustrated tab portion 40 of the shingle generally terminates to generally align with the visible first surface 50 of the interleaf 70 as shown. Any suitable alignment may be employed.

Referring to FIG. 18, it will be appreciated that the illustrated first surface 50 is shown generally aligned with the downward most portion of the lowermost overlying shingle. Any suitable alignment may be employed. The tab portion 40 of the shingle is generally raised by the interleaf 90 underneath, thereby allowing the first surface 50 of the interleaf 90 to be visible. The illustrated tab portion 40 of the shingle generally terminates to generally align with the visible first surface 50 of the interleaf 90 as shown. Any suitable alignment may be employed.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The disclosure may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including equivalent constructions. Further, the purpose of the foregoing abstract is to enable the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally, and especially the scientists, engineers and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The abstract and disclosure are neither intended to define the invention of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor are they intended to be limiting as to the scope of the invention in any way.