Title:
Fungus strip
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fungus strip that release ions when precipitation flows down on the strip that are deleterious to fungus and algae. The strip is positioned on a building material. The strip has a length, width and thickness. The ions are preferably of zinc or tin. The building material can be asphaltic roofing shingles, non-asphaltic roofing, or siding.



Inventors:
Railkar, Sudhir (Wayne, NJ, US)
Chich, Adem (Kearny, NJ, US)
Duffy, Brian (Wayne, NJ, US)
Zarate, Walter (Prospect Park, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/199519
Publication Date:
02/22/2007
Filing Date:
08/08/2005
Assignee:
BUILDING MATERIALS INVESTMENT CORPORATION
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B61D17/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, CHI Q
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Tarter Krinsky & Drogin LLP (New York, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A fungus strip comprising: a strip having a length, width and thickness, positioned on a building material that releases ions when contacted by water deleterious to fungus and algae.

2. The fungus strip of claim 1 wherein: the ions are of zinc or tin.

3. The fungus strip of claim 1 wherein: the strip comprises a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, lead, zinc, iron, cuprous oxide, cuprous bromide, nickel, bromate, and mixtures and compounds thereof.

4. The fungus strip of claim 1 wherein: the building material is selected from the group consisting of asphaltic roofing shingles, non-asphaltic roofing, siding, shake shingles, and decking.

5. The fungus strip of claim 1 wherein: the strip has a width of from about 1/16th to 12 inches, and a thickness of from about 1/64th inch to about 2 inches.

6. A fungus strip comprising: a strip that releases ions deleterious to biological growth fixed to a building.

7. The fungus strip of claim 6 wherein: the strip comprises a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, lead, zinc, iron, cuprous oxide, cuprous bromide, nickel, bromate, and mixtures and compounds thereof.

8. The fungus strip of claim 6 wherein: the strip is positioned as a flashing on a building, or the strip is positioned on a flashing on a building.

9. The fungus strip of claim 6 wherein: the strip comprises tin, zinc, or tin and zinc.

10. The fungus strip of claim 6 wherein: the strip has a width of from about 1/16th to 12 inches, and a thickness of from about 1/64th inch to about 2 inches.

11. A roof covering comprising: a ridge vent; and, a fungus strip adjacent to the ridge vent for releasing ions deleterious to fungus and algae when precipitation falls on the ridge vent and flows down on the strip and on to a roof.

12. A roof covering as in claim 11 wherein: the ridge vent comprises a unitary panel of plastic material having a length and a width and top and bottom faces and being flexible in a lateral direction so as to be adjustable to the slope of the roof; support structures in the bottom face of the unitary panel to prevent collapse or warping over the roof; ventilation means allowing the flow of air from the space below the panel to the exterior; and, exterior baffles integral with the unitary panel.

13. A roof covering as in claim 11 wherein: the strip comprises a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, lead, zinc, iron, cuprous oxide, cuprous bromide, nickel, bromate, and mixtures and compounds thereof.

14. The roof covering of claim 11 wherein: the ions are of zinc or tin.

15. The roof covering of claim 11 wherein: the strip has a width of from about 1/16th to 12 inches, and a thickness of from about 1/64th inch to about 2 inches.

16. The roof covering of claim 11 wherein: the fungus strip is positioned on a flashing that is positioned adjacent to the roof ridge vent.

17. The roof covering of claim 11 wherein: the fungus strip is integral with the flashing, or the fungus strip is integral to the ridge vent, or the fungus strip is integral to the baffle.

18. A method of preventing the build-up of algae and fungus on a building comprising: providing a strip on a building material for releasing ions deleterious to fungus and algae when precipitation falls on the strip.

19. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the strip is positioned adjacent to a roof ridge vent for releasing ions when precipitation falls on the roof ridge vent and flows down on the strip and onto a roof.

20. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the strip comprises a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, lead, zinc, iron, cuprous oxide, cuprous bromide, nickel, bromate, and mixtures and compounds thereof.

21. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the ions are of zinc or tin.

22. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the strip is positioned on a flashing, or the strip is integral with the flashing.

23. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the strip has a width of from about 1/16th to 12 inches, and a thickness of from about 1/64th inch to about 2 inches.

24. A method as in claim 18 wherein: the building material is selected from the group consisting of asphaltic roofing shingles, non-asphaltic roofing, siding, shake shingles, and decking.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to strips capable of reducing discoloration and deterioration in roof shingles. More particularly, the invention relates to strips comprising copper, tin or zinc attached to a building material such as roofing or adjacent to vents to reduce or eliminate the growth of algae and fungi.

2. Reported Developments

Roofing granules are extensively used in roll roofing and asphalt shingle compositions. The roofing granules are embedded in the asphalt coating on the surface of the asphalt-impregnated base material, the granules thus forming a coating that provides an adherent, weather-resistant exterior roofing surface.

While the problem exists in many climates, in warm and humid climates discoloration and deterioration of asphalt roofing compositions by the growth of algae, fungi and other biological growth is of particular concern. Roofing materials, such as shingles, frequently comprise a fiberglass substrate with a filled asphalt coating. The filler in the asphalt coating acts to make the roofing materials more fire resistant; but it has also been partly responsible for the increase in microbial growth-induced staining.

An organism responsible for the microbial growth-induced staining of roofing materials is a cyanobacterium, known as blue-green algae. Other bacterium species are also known to cause discoloration primarily by secreting a mucilaginous biofilm around their cells.

This condition can also arise with other building materials such as Modified Bitumen APP Membranes, Modified Bitumen SBS Membranes, TPO, PVC and EPDM membranes, vinyl, fiber cement, wood and other siding materials.

To prevent such discoloration the prior art proposed the use of metallic algaecides and fungicides incorporated into roofing granules that are effective in retarding the biological growth of algae and fungi. The biological growth-preventive compounds include: metallic chips, such as copper, lead, zinc, and iron; zinc-containing compounds such as ZnO and ZnS; cuprous oxide and cuprous bromide; zinc, copper, nickel and mixtures thereof; bromate; and cuprous oxide and zinc sulfide. The metallic algaecides and fungicides are deleterious to algae and fungi thereby curtailing their growth on roof shingles and other building materials and preventing discoloration.

The above referred-to compositions incorporated in roofing granules are essentially designed for new roof coverings made by manufacturers of roof shingles. Alternatively, a cleaning procedure may be used which comprises a gentle application of dilute chlorine bleach and trisodium phosphate to avoid roof damage and discoloration. Roof material cleaning by gentle application of chlorine bleach and trisodium phosphate is only temporarily effective. To eliminate the problem the roof shingles may also be replaced with asphalt shingles containing algaecides and fungicides. Such replacement is costly, cumbersome and economically undesirable.

The present invention provides algaecidal and fungicidal designs for asphalt and non-asphalt roof shingles and other building materials accomplished by a simple, economically advantageous design which does not require replacement of roof shingles on existing buildings and/or can be used in new roof construction, and does not require roofing or siding containing algaecidal or fungicidal compounds or compositions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides for an algae and fungi-retardant apparatus comprising a strip attached to the building material on a side, roof or attached below and adjacent to a roof ridge vent. The strip has one or more lengths to cover a length of a roof or side; preferably a width of from about 1/16th to 12 inches but maybe several feet; and preferably a thickness of from about 1/64th to 2 inches or more. The strip can be secured to an asphaltic or non-asphaltic roof covering in a position designed to provide for precipitation to flow over the strip and over the roofing material. The strip can be positioned adjacent to the external baffle of a roof ridge vent and secured thereto by the use of adhesives, nails, screws or other known methods. Alternatively, the strip may be used as a flashing, attached to a flashing, and any combination of the above. The strip can further be positioned on a building side that is exposed to precipitation flowing over it. As precipitation flows over the strip, the ions released from the strip flow over the building material and reduce or eliminate the growth of algae and fungi on the building material.

The present invention is convenient and economical for use on existing asphalt shingles with and without algaecidal and fungicidal compositions incorporated therein, it may also be used on new shingles covering newly constructed roofs with or without algaecidal and fungicidal compositions incorporated therein. The present invention may also be used on non-asphaltic roofs, including single ply-membranes, roofing tiles, roll roofing, built up roofing, commercial cap sheets, modified bitumen cap sheets, shakes and sidewalls. Further, the invention may be used on different siding materials. Besides the materials already mentioned, this invention may be used with any building material susceptible to fungus and mold growth including but not limited to modified bitumen APP (Atactic Polypropylene) membranes, modified bitumen SBS (Styrene butadiene styrene) membranes, TPO (Thermoplastic olefin membrane), PVC (Polyvinyl chloride), and EPDM (Ethylene propylene diene terpolymers) membranes, vinyl, fiber cement, and other siding materials.

The fungus strip may be used with any type of roof and with a variety of ridge vents. However, when used on a ridge vent it is preferred to use the strip with a specific plastic ridge vent that is described hereunder. Other ridge vents include but are limited to those embodied in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,924,761; 4,957,037; 5,095,810; 5,704,834; 5,772,502; and 6,227,963.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a schematic exploded view of a plastic ridge vent attached to a roof;

FIG. 2 is a schematic exploded perspective view of a plastic ridge vent attached to a roof;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the plastic ridge vent mounted on a section of a building roof;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the plastic ridge vent and one embodiment of the fungus strip;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the plastic ridge vent and a second of the fungus strip;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of the plastic ridge vent and a third embodiment of the fungus strip.

FIG. 7 is a schematic view of fungus strip applied to a shingled roof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows a schematic exploded perspective view of a plastic ridge vent 10 attached to a roof 12 to which fungus strip 1 is secured. The fungus strip 1 is positioned longitudinally and parallel to the plastic ridge vent which comprises external baffles 50 and 50′. Fungus strip 1 terminates in ends 2 and 2′ projecting at about 90° therefrom. Preferably, the fungus strip can be bent and secured to roof 12 underneath the external baffles 50, 50′ by nails or glue. Preferably, the fungus strip comprises tin or zinc. The thickness of the strip is typically 1/16th to 2 inches or more.

FIG. 2 shows a schematic exploded perspective view of a plastic ridge vent 10 attached to a roof 12 to which fungus strip 1 is secured. The fungus strip 1 is positioned longitudinally and parallel to the plastic ridge vent which comprises external baffles 50 and 50′. Fungus strip 1 terminates in ends 2 and 2′ projecting at about 90° therefrom and has a vertical portion and a horizontal portion that are not necessarily 90° from each other. In a preferred embodiment, the fungus strip 1 is marked with nail or glue points 5 on its horizontal portion to aid installation. Preferably, the fungus strip comprises tin or zinc. The width of the horizontal portion is typically 1/16th to 12 inches or more, the height of the vertical portion may be 1/16th to 4 inches, while the thickness of the strip is typically 1/16th to 2 inches or more.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the plastic ridge vent 10 mounted on a section of a building roof 12. Building roof 12 comprises a plurality of crossbeams 14 and 14′ joined together at 16 to form the structural support for building roof 12. Plywood decking 18 and 18′ are laid over the cross-beams. The plywood decking is covered with shingles 20 and 20′. The plywood decking and covering shingles on the plywood decking do not completely cover the roof; at the ridge of the roof there is an opening or ridge slot 22 that serves as an vent for air from space below the ridge 24. The ridge slot exists between each pair of cross-beams defining a continuous space under the peak of the roof so that the attic air can be vented to the outside. While the ridge slot provides for ventilation of the attic space, it also allows entry of rain, snow, insects and debris to enter into the attic space. To prevent such entry, as well-known in the art, a ridge vent covers the ridge slot and at least partially overlaps the plywood deck and shingles of the roof. The overlap ensures that precipitation does not migrate toward the peak of the roof and enter the attic space or space below the ridge.

The ridge vent 10 covers a slot at the peak of the roof and provides for proper ventilation of attic space 24 while preventing entry of moisture, insects and other elements thereinto without substantially affecting the maximum ventilating capability of the gap if left uncovered.

The plastic ridge vent comprises a unitary panel 26 that is disposed over the ridge of the roof. The vent can be contoured to the configuration of the roof angle, which can be of about 10° to 45° or more since the plastic material of which the panel is made can be contoured to any desired angle on the roof. While the unitary construction is preferred, the panel may be constructed of two isometric panels joined together at the peak of the roof or other suitable means. Accordingly, the plastic ridge vent has a top face and bottom face. The vent is bent at central point line 28 so that the panel conforms to the peak of the ridge. To obtain a smooth configuration, plastic ridge vent 10 can be bent not only at central point line 28 but also at linear point lines 30 and 30′. The fungus strip 1 is applied to the external baffles 50 and 50′ of the ridge vent 10.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the fungus strip 1, nailed 55 to the baffle 50 of the ridge vent 10 (the ridge vent partially shown). In FIG. 4 the strip terminates at the top 60 and bottom 62 of the baffle 50 and is the approximate width and contour of the baffle.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the fungus strip 1 nailed to the roof 12 by nail 55 which also secures the ridge vent 10 (partially shown). In this embodiment the fungus strip 1 is a continuous strip from the top of the baffle 60 under the louvers 32 of the louver portion of the ridge vent 10 and beyond the nail portion 64 of the ridge vent 10.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the fungus strip 1 nailed to the roof 12 by nail 55 which also secures the ridge vent 10 (partially shown). In this embodiment the fungus strip 1 is substantially planar and is of a width such that it extends beyond the baffle 50 at one end and beyond the nail portion on the other end.

It is not necessary that the fungus strip follow the contour of the baffle, it may be substantially planar and it may also rise above or below the baffle top 60.

In FIG. 7 the fungus strip 1 is applied to a shingled roof 100 without a ridge vent. The strip may be applied to any part of the roof without regard to a vent or venting system. Additionally, the strip may be applied to a non-asphaltic roof. The strip may be attached to the roof through known means including adhesives, double sided tape, and fasteners including nails and screws. Further, the building materials may be in various forms including, for example, asphalt roofing shingles, non-asphaltic roofing shingles, roofing tiles, roll roofing, commercial cap sheets, modified bitumen cap sheets, shakes and sidewalls.

Accordingly, it should be readily appreciated that the device and method of the present invention has many practical applications. Additionally, although the preferred embodiments have been illustrated and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. Such modifications are to be considered as included in the following claims.