Title:
Golf putter with reflective head and method of using the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf putter having a head which has a highly reflective upper surface. The reflective surface on the putter allows the golfer to see his eye position reflected in the putter. The putter is positioned adjacent the golf ball so that the reflected image of the golfer's eyes lays slightly behind and below the golf ball. As the golfer putts, he or she maintains the set-up position of their head to keep their eyes in the same position on takeaway as they were when they initially addressed the ball. This helps the golfer keep his head and body in the correct position while they are putting and helps them develop a more consistent putting stroke.



Inventors:
Haack, Scott G. (Massillon, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/490223
Publication Date:
01/25/2007
Filing Date:
07/19/2006
Assignee:
OPTIX GOLF COMPANY, LLC (Massillon, OH, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PASSANITI, SEBASTIANO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SAND, SEBOLT & WERNOW CO., LPA (CANTON, OH, US)
Claims:
1. A golf putter comprising: a head having an upper surface, a lower surface and a putting face disposed therebetween; said lower surface being adapted to be soled on a grass surface when a golfer addresses a golf ball; a shaft extending outwardly away from the upper surface of the head; and a reflective surface provided on the upper surface of the head; said reflective surface being adapted to permit the golfer to observe at least a portion of the reflection of his face therein.

2. The golf putter as defined in claim 1, wherein the reflective surface comprises one of a mirror and a metallic layer affixed to the upper surface of the head.

3. The golf putter as defined in claim 2, wherein the one of the mirror and the metallic layer is affixed to upper surface of the head by one of an adhesive layer, screws and rivets.

4. The golf putter as defined in claim 1, wherein the reflective surface is a highly polished metallic member.

5. The golf putter as defined in claim 4, wherein the highly polished member is affixed to the upper surface by one of an adhesive layer, screws and rivets.

6. The golf putter as defined in claim 4, wherein the highly polished member is integrally formed with the upper surface of the head.

7. The golf putter as defined in claim 1, wherein the upper surface of the head is substantially flat.

8. The golf putter as defined in claim 1, wherein the reflective surface is sufficiently reflective so as to allow the golfer to easily and clearly observe his reflection therein.

9. A method of putting comprising: observing the location of a hole toward which a golf ball is to be hit; positioning a putting face of a golf putter adjacent the golf ball; looking into a highly reflective surface on an upper surface of a head of the golf putter to see a reflected image of the golfer's eyes therein; observing the position of the eyes in the reflected image relative to the position of the golf ball; adjusting the position of one of the putter head and the golfer's body so that the eyes in the reflected image lay behind and below the position of the ball to be putted; and striking the golf ball with the putting face of the putter.

10. The method of putting as defined in claim 9, wherein the step of adjusting the position of one of the putter head and golfer's body includes the alternating steps of: checking the line of sight to the hole; checking the relative positions of the reflected eyes in the upper surface of the putter and the position of the ball until the ball is aligned with the golfer's best estimated line of site to the remote hole.

11. The method of putting as defined in claim 9, wherein the step of striking the golf ball with the putting face of the putter includes the steps of: swinging the putter rearwardly while maintaining the position of the golfer's head and eyes; swinging the putter forwardly to strike the ball while continuing to maintain the position of the golfer's head and eyes.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a standard utility application claiming priority from U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/702,131 which was filed on Jul. 25, 2005, the entire specification of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

This invention generally relates to golf clubs. More particularly, the invention relates to golf putters. Specifically, the invention relates to a golf putter that has a reflective upper surface on its head to help the golfer learn to position his head correctly and thereby putt more accurately.

2. Background Information

Golfers are always trying to improve their game and there are consequently numerous aids, teaching tools, videos and programs aimed at the golfer to assist them in achieving their potential. The golfer may utilize all of these resources yet still encounter problems when they are out on the course. Many amateurs presume that the most important part of the game is driving the ball to the green. Consequently, the golfer may spend a lot of their self-improvement time and effort in an attempt to correct their drive to minimize slicing or hooking of the ball and hitting the ball as far as possible.

While these aspects of the game are important, most golfers tend to drop strokes when they reach the putting green. The problem many golfers face on the putting green is that they have little awareness of where their head should be in relation to the ball and whether or not their position is appropriate for viewing the correct line of sight to the hole. They therefore tend to place the club before striking the ball, look at the hole one or twice and then execute a motion to try and sink the ball in the hole. On occasion, the position of the putter head and the position of the golfer's head and body is correct and they accidentally manage to make a good putt. Other times, however, because the golfer is not aware of the position of their head in relation to the head of the golf club, they tend to assume an incorrect body and putter position and they make a bad putt. The golfer therefore tends to be inconsistent in their putting and their overall game is weakened.

There is therefore a need in the art for a device which will aid the golfer in becoming more consistent and successful in their putting.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The device of the present invention is a golf putter that has a head with a reflective upper surface. The reflective surface on the upper surface of the putter allows the golfer to see the reflection of his eye position in the reflective surface. The putter is positioned adjacent the golf ball so that the putting surface abuts the ball and the reflected image of the golfer's eyes lies slightly behind and below the golf ball. As the golfer putts, he maintains his head in the position he assumed when he addressed the ball. The putter of this invention helps the golfer learn to keep his or her head in the correct position while they are putting and helps them develop a more consistent putting stroke.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The preferred embodiments of the invention, illustrative of the best mode in which applicant has contemplated applying the principles, are set forth in the following description and are shown in the drawings and are particularly and distinctly pointed out and set forth in the appended claims.

FIG. 1 is a partial perspective view of a golf putter in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view showing a golfer viewing his reflection in the reflective putter head and positioning himself correctly to putt the golf ball;

FIG. 3 is a top illustrative view through line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and showing part of the golfer's face reflected in the reflective surface on the putter head;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional side view through line 3-3 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a top view of a golfer addressing a ball and showing the putter head's reflection of the golfer's eyes in an incorrect position proximate a lower edge of the putter head;

FIG. 6 is a top view of a golfer addressing a ball and showing the putter head's reflection of the golfer's eyes in an incorrect position proximate an upper edge of the putter head; and

FIG. 7 is a top view of a golfer addressing a ball and showing the putter head's reflection of the golfer's eyes in a correct position proximate the midline of the putter head.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to FIGS. 1-4, there is shown a golf putter in accordance with the present invention and generally indicated at 10. Putter 10 includes a shaft 12 and a club head 14. The general shape of club head 14 is by way of example only as the invention can be carried out on any shape of putter head. Club head 14 has an upper surface 16, a lower surface 18 and sides 20. Lower surface 18 of club is adapted to be soled, or rested, on the grass of a putting green when the golfer is ready to putt.

In accordance with a specific feature of the present invention, upper surface 16 includes a reflective surface 22. Upper surface 16 preferably is substantially flat so that when a golfer stands in a correct position with their head immediately over club head 14, the golfer is able to observe their reflection in reflective surface 22. Furthermore, reflective surface 22 preferably is sufficiently reflective so as to allow the golfer 24 to easily and clearly observe his reflection 26 therein (FIG. 3). Reflective surface 22 may be made of any suitable highly reflective material such as a mirror or a highly polished metallic layer that is applied to upper surface 16. Reflective surface 22 may be secured to upper surface 16 of head 14 in any suitable manner such as by way of an adhesive applied between upper surface 16 and reflective surface 22, or by screws, rivets or other fasteners. It will be understood that head 14 may alternatively be manufactured entirely from metal and the upper surface 16 highly polished to form the reflective surface 22. In this instance, reflective surface 22 is integrally formed with the remainder of the body of the head 14. It will also be understood that upper surface 16 of head preferably is substantially planar in nature so that the reflected image observed in reflected surface 22 is not distorted.

FIGS. 2, 3 and 5-7 illustrate the golf putter 10 of the present invention in use. Golfer 24 looks at the remote hole (not shown) toward which golf ball 30 is to be hit, assumes his/her stance for putting and places the putting face 28 of head 14 in abutting contact with the ball 30. Golfer 24 then looks into reflective surface 22 and moves his body so that when he looks downwardly toward upper surface 16, he is able to see at least a portion of his face in reflected in reflective surface 22. Golfer 24 then carefully observes the position of the reflected image 26 of his eyes relative to the position of golf ball 30. The optimum desired relative position is for the reflection 26 to lie behind and slightly below ball 30 (FIG. 3). If, when golfer 24 looks downwardly he does not see his reflection 26 in the correct relative position, he then adjusts one of the position of putter head 14 and his body so that reflected image 26 is brought into the correct position. It is easiest for golfer 24 to position himself and the putter 10 properly if the reflection 26 of his eyes 32 lies substantially on the midline X-X′ of head 14 and not proximate upper side 20b or lower side 20a of putter 10. If necessary, golfer 24 adjusts his position of that of head 14 to ensure that the ball 30 and the reflection 26 of his eyes 32 are aligned with the hole and substantially in the middle of head 14.

FIG. 5 shows the situation where the reflection of the golfer's eyes 32 lies proximate the lower side face 20a, in alignment with the hole 34, but out of alignment with ball 30. If golfer 24 strikes the ball 30 with the putter 10 in this position, the ball 30 will miss hole 34 as illustrated by the line A-A′.

FIG. 6 illustrates the situation where the reflection of the golfer's eyes 32 lies proximate the upper side face 20b of head 14, in alignment with the hole 34, but out of alignment with ball 30. In this instance, if golfer 24 strikes ball 30 with putter 10, ball 30 will pass below the hole 34 as illustrated by line B-B′.

FIG. 7 illustrates the situation where the reflection of the golfer's eyes 32 lies proximate the midline of head 14, in alignment with hole 34 and adjacent ball 30. If golfer 24 strikes ball 30 with putter 10 in this position, ball 30 will sink in hole 34 as illustrated by the line C-C′.

Golfer 24 then alternatively checks the line of sight to the remote hole and the relative position of the image 26 of his reflected eyes 32 and ball 30 until the ball is aligned with the golfer's best estimated line of site to the remote hole. Golfer 24 then swings putter 10 rearwardly while maintaining the position of their head and eyes. Golfer 24 then swings putter 10 forwardly to strike ball 30 while continuing to maintain the position of their head and eyes.

As golfer 24 practices and plays with putter 10, his putting will become more consistent. He will learn through practice the correct position and placement of the putter 10 relative to ball 30 in order to obtain the correct line of sight to the hole. He will also learn through repetitiously correctly positioning the reflection of his eyes in reflective surface 22 of head 14, where to hold his head when he putts.

Golfer 24 may practice drawing putter 10 rearwardly and turning his head slightly to, attempting to keep the reflection of his eyes 32 in the same position on surface 22 as putter 10 is drawn rearwardly. However, when golfer 24 intends to actually strike ball 30, he assumes the correct stance and putter head 14 placement as previously described, draws putter 10 rearwardly while maintaining the set-up position of both his head and eyes (i.e., not turning his head or moving his eyes to follow the movement of putter head 14) and then swings putter 10 forwardly so that head 14 strikes ball 30 while continuing to keep his head and eyes in the set-up position (i.e., not moving his head or eyes to follow either the swing of putter head 14 or the movement of the ball 30 after it is struck.

In the foregoing description, certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness, and understanding. No unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirement of the prior art because such terms are used for descriptive purposes and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the description and illustration of the invention are an example and the invention is not limited to the exact details shown or described.