Title:
Jack rafter connectors
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A jack rafter connector comprises a first part (70) insertable in a first hollow roof beam (7) and a second part (90) for attachment to the side of a second roof beam (4), said parts being mutually engageable to connect the first and second roof beams, one of which constitutes a jack rafter.



Inventors:
Richardson, Christopher (Lanchashire, GB)
Application Number:
10/546881
Publication Date:
01/18/2007
Filing Date:
03/01/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/57
International Classes:
E04B7/18; E04B7/06; E04D3/08; E04D13/00; F16B7/04; F16B21/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CAJILIG, CHRISTINE T
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WOOD, PHILLIPS, KATZ, CLARK & MORTIMER (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:
1. A jack rafter connector comprising a first part insertable in a first hollow roof beam and a second part for attachment to the side of a second roof beam, said parts being mutually engageable to connect the first and second roof beams, one of which constitutes a jack rafter.

2. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 1, wherein one connector part has a slot and the other part has a spigot to fit the slot.

3. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 2, wherein the slot has a first dimension and a second dimension normal to and shorter than the first dimension.

4. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 2, wherein the spigot has an end plate of similar dimensions to the slot but orientated through 90° in its in use position relative to the slot, whereby the two parts can be engaged and rotated through 90° to connect the two parts and orientate the two roof beams correctly relative to each other.

5. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 2, wherein the slotted connector part is slidably insertable into a roof beam end and the spigot connector is attachable to the side of a roof beam.

6. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 1, wherein screws or the like may be used to fix either or both of the connector parts to their respective roof beams.

7. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 1, wherein the connector part that is inserted into a roof beam has connecting formations at both ends.

8. A jack rafter connector as claimed in claim 7, wherein the end faces of said connector part are at different angles to each other, so that the connector part may be reversed to enable it to be used in forming jack rafter connections at two different preset angles.

9. A jack rafter arrangement comprising first and second roof beams connected by a connector as claimed in any one of claims 1 to 8.

10. A jack rafter arrangement, wherein first and second roof beams comprise a core profile of metal, a plastics member fitted to the core profile and providing at least one ledge for carrying an edge of a sheet of glazing material and a cap mountable on the plastics member for retaining the glazing sheet thereon.

11. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the core profile is a hollow extrusion and the plastics member is a sheath for the core profile.

12. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the plastics member is mountable on top of the core profile.

13. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 12, wherein the plastics member is a sliding fit or a snap fit on the top of the core profile.

14. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 12, wherein reinforcement is provided internally of the core profile.

15. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 14, wherein the reinforcement is in the form of steel profiles inserted into the core profile.

16. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein either or both of the core profile and the sheath are shaped to reduce direct contact between them.

17. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 16, wherein the sheath has on its inner spaced surface ribs or the like to provide the only lines of contact with the core profile in certain regions.

18. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 16, wherein additionally or alternatively, the core profile bar has spaced feet or flanges that make end contact with the sheath.

19. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the core profile has a sectional profile of a trapezium having a narrow base and wider top.

20. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 19, wherein the sheath has a corresponding profile to that of the core profile.

21. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the plastics member has a pair of ledges, one each side of a connection formation for attachment of the cap.

22. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 21, wherein holes for the internal projections of the end cap are provided in the ledges.

23. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 21, wherein the ledges have gasket material thereon for sealing against the underside of glazing material.

24. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 23, wherein the gasket material is of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material.

25. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 23, wherein the gasket material is fitted in grooves or the like in the ledges or bonded to or co-extruded onto the ledges.

26. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 21, wherein between the ledges and the connection formation, the sheath has longitudinal channels to provide drainage passages in case of water penetration through the roof beam.

27. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 21, wherein the connection formation of the plastics member is in the form of a slot whose sides extend upwardly from the top of the sheath.

28. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 27, wherein the sides end with internal lips, whose top surfaces are chamfered for ease of entry of a connection formation of the cap.

29. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 28, wherein the cap has an, in use, depending connection formation having at least one pair of ribs thereon that can be pushed into the slot of the plastics member and retained there with glazing material sandwiched between the cap and the ledges of the plastics member.

30. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 29, wherein two pairs of ribs are provided on the cap connection formation, so as to allow the cap to be fitted at two different heights relative to the plastics member to accommodate glazing materials of different thickness.

31. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 29, wherein the cap has a single pair of ribs and the slot of the plastics member has two pairs of internal barbs or the like to allow the cap to be fitted over two different thicknesses of glazing material.

32. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the cap is generally of T-section, the stem of the T providing the connection formation.

33. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 32, wherein the cross bar of the T-section has gasket material at ends thereof for sealing against the topside of glazing material.

34. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 33, wherein the gasket material is of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material.

35. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 33, wherein the gasket material is fitted in grooves or the like in the ends of the cap crossbar or bonded to or co-extruded onto the ends thereof.

36. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein the cross bar of the cap is arcuate and ends thereof depend to meet the glazing material.

37. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, having anti-theft means.

38. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 37, wherein, said anti-theft means is a clip or the like that can be positioned on the end of the cap to mask the slot or channel from insertion of a lifting tool.

39. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 38, wherein the clip or the like is generally U-shaped to fit either side of the slot or channel.

40. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 39, wherein internally of the clip one or more barbs are provided for gripping the outer sides of the slot or channel or for locating in depression or holes provided in the sides of the slot or channel.

41. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 38, wherein the clip has flared ends to facilitate fitting thereof.

42. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 38, wherein the clip has a pair of lugs that extend from the closed end of the clip to overlie the top edges of the slot or channel sides, in order to prevent insertion of a lifting tool.

43. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, any one of claims 10 to 42 having a flashing trim located under the caps of the jack rafter and the main roof beam.

44. A jack rafter arrangement as claimed in claim 10, wherein a spring clip is provided on the glazing bar of the jack rafter to retain the sheath thereon.

45. (canceled)

46. (canceled)

Description:

This invention concerns improvements in and relating to jack rafter connectors.

In, for example, so-called Georgian style conservatory roofs, it is common to have main glazing roof beams at roof ends extending from one end of a central ridge to corners of the roof and to have so-called jack rafters extending from one or both sides of such a beam to the eaves of the roof. In our co-pending application (P5135) we have proposed a new form of roof beam based on a hollow core profile and a plastics member for receiving a cap for retaining a glazing panel.

An object of this invention is to provide a jack rafter connector for use with the new form of roof beam.

According to this invention there is provided a jack rafter connector comprising a first part insertable in a first hollow roof beam and a second part for attachment to the side of a second roof beam, said parts being mutually engageable to connect the first and second roof beams, one of which constitutes a jack rafter.

Preferably one connector part has a slot and the other part has a spigot to fit the slot. Preferably the slot has a first dimension and a second dimension normal to and shorter than the first dimension. Preferably the spigot has an end plate of similar dimensions to the slot but orientated through 90° in its in use position relative to the slot, whereby the two parts can be engaged and rotated through 90° to connect the two parts and orientate the two roof beams correctly relative to each other.

Preferably the slotted connector part is slidably insertable into a roof beam end and the spigot connector is attachable to the side of a roof beam. Screws or the like may be used to fix either or both of the connector parts to their respective roof beams.

Preferably the connector part that is inserted into a roof beam has connecting formations at both ends. Preferably the end faces of the connector part are at different angles to each other, so that the connector part may be reversed to enable it to be used in forming jack rafter connections at two different preset angles. A jack rafter connection in a Victorian style conservatory roof will be at a different angle to that in a Georgian style roof because and two such possibilities are preferably catered for by the jack rafter connector of the invention.

The roof beams to which the present invention particularly pertains are preferably those comprising a core profile of metal, a plastics member fitted to the core profile and providing at least one ledge for carrying an edge of a sheet of glazing material and a cap mountable on the plastics member for retaining the glazing sheet thereon.

In a first preferred embodiment the core profile is a hollow extrusion and the plastics member is a sheath for the core profile. In another preferred embodiment, the plastics member is mountable on top of the core profile. For example, the plastics member may be a sliding fit or a snap fit on the top of the core profile. Reinforcement may be provided internally of the core profile, such as in the form of steel profiles inserted into the core profile. Such reinforcement is mainly intended for use with core profile lengths over a predetermined threshold for additional strength. The core profile and or the sheath are preferably shaped to reduce direct contact between them. For example, the sheath may have on its inner spaced surface ribs or the like to provide the only lines of contact with the core profile in certain regions. Additionally or alternatively, the core profile bar can have spaced feet or flanges that make end contact with the sheath.

A preferred sectional profile for the core profiles used in the invention is that of a trapezium having a narrow base and wider top. The sheath preferably has a corresponding profile.

The plastics member, such as the sheath, preferably has a pair of ledges one each side of a connection formation for attachment of the cap. The ledges preferably have gasket material, such as of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material, thereon for sealing against the underside of glazing material. The gasket material may be fitted in grooves or the like in the ledges or may be bonded to or co-extruded onto the ledges. Between the ledges and the connection formation, the sheath preferably has longitudinal channels to provide drainage passages in case of water penetration through the roof beam.

The connection formation of the plastics member, such as the sheath, is preferably in the form of a slot whose sides extend upwardly from the top of the sheath. The sides end with internal lips, whose top surfaces are preferably chamfered for ease of entry of a connection formation of the cap. The cap preferably has an, in use, depending connection formation having at least one pair and preferably two pairs of ribs thereon that can be pushed into the slot of the plastics member and retained there with glazing material sandwiched between the cap and the ledges of the plastics member. Two pairs of ribs are preferably provided on the cap connection formation, so as to allow the cap to be fitted at two different heights relative to the plastics member to accommodate glazing materials of different thickness. Alternatively, the cap may have a single pair of ribs and the slot of the plastics member may have two pairs of internal barbs or the like to allow the cap to be fitted over two different thicknesses of glazing material.

The cap is preferably generally of T-section, the stem of the T providing the connection formation. The cross bar of the T-section preferably has gasket material at ends thereof, such as of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material, for sealing against the topside of glazing material. The gasket material may be fitted in grooves or the like in the ends of the cap crossbar or may be bonded to or co-extruded onto the ends thereof. The cross bar of the cap is preferably arcuate and ends thereof preferably depend to meet the glazing material.

The roof beams may be mounted between a ridge beam and eaves beam by any suitable means, although it is to be noted that the preferred hollow nature of the core profile allows for fitting of roof beam connectors that can cooperate with formations of a ridge and/or eaves beam for ease of fitting. Preferably such connectors permit snap fitting with cooperating formations of ridge and/or eaves beams.

This invention will now be further described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a typical Georgian style conservatory roof;

FIG. 2 is an end view of part of a Georgian style conservatory roof;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the part roof of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view from one end of one part of a jack rafter connector according to the invention;

FIG. 5 shows the connector part of FIG. 4 from the opposite end;

FIG. 6 is a view from one side of the other part of a jack rafter connector of the invention;

FIG. 7 is an opposite side view of the jack rafter connector part of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 shows the first jack rafter connector part fitted to a jack rafter;

FIG. 9 shows the other jack rafter connector part fitted to a main roof beam;

FIG. 10 shows a spring clip for preventing movement of a roof beam sleeve;

FIG. 11 is a side view of a jack rafter with the spring clip fitted;

FIG. 12 shows the jack rafter of FIG. 1 1;

FIG. 13 is a view from above of a flashing trim for a jack rafter situation;

FIG. 14 shows the jack rafter flashing trim from below;

FIG. 15 shows a jack rafter situation from above with the flashing trim of FIGS. 13 and 14 in place; and

FIG. 16 shows the jack rafter situation of FIG. 15 from the side.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the accompanying drawings, a typical Georgian style hipped roof 1 has a first part 2 having a ridge 3 and transom roof beams 4 extending at right angles therefrom down to eaves 5. The hipped part 6 of the roof has a pair of roof beams 4 extending to corners of the roof and jack rafters 7 connecting those beams 4 to the eaves 5. Glazing panels 8 are supported between the roof beams 4.

Turning to FIGS. 2 and 3 of the accompanying drawings, a roof beam 4 comprises a core profile 16 of hollow section extruded from aluminium, an extruded plastics sheath 18 fitted over the core profile and a cap 20 mounted on the sheath and trapping edges of the glazing panels between the sheath and the cap. The core profile is a trapezium in section having a narrower base 22 than top 24. The base has along opposite edges ribs 26 that act as feet for the base and provide minimal contact between the base and the sheath in that region. The top 24 of the core profile has a pair of flanges 27 extending upwardly and outwardly therefrom that provide surfaces 28 that contact the inside surface of the sheath.

The sheath has a corresponding sectional profile to that of the core profile. Its side walls 30 each have a longitudinal rib 32 that serves to space the core profile from the sheath to minimise contact between them. Similarly, the top wall 34 of the sheath has depending ribs 35 again that space the top wall of the core profile from the inside surface of the sheath top wall. Within its top corners the sheath has a pair of ledges 36 that form channels 38 to locate the flanges 26 of the core profile.

The top wall 34 of the sheath has near its side edges gasket material 37 of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material co-extruded or bonded thereon for sealing against the underside of glazing panels mounted on the roof beam. Centrally of the top wall 34 of the sheath is an upstanding connection formation 40 for attachment of the cap to the sheath. Either side of the formation 40 is a groove 42 providing a drainage passage for any water or condensation tat may collect on the sheath.

The connection formation 40 is in the form of a slot having a relatively narrow opening between lips 46 at the top ends of the slot sides 48. The cap 20 is generally T-shaped in section and has an arcuate top 50 and a depending limb 52 that has two pairs of barbs 54 on opposite sides thereof. The barbs are shaped so as to pass relatively easily into the slot 40 but to be difficult to remove therefrom. Two pairs of barbs are provided to allow the cap to accommodate two different thicknesses of glazing panel. The cap top has its ends 58 turned downwards and gasket material 59 of rubber or other suitable elastomeric material co-extruded or bonded onto the ends 58 for sealing against the top surfaces of the glazing panels. Because the cap is extruded of plastics material it has some inherent resilience, so that when pushed down onto the sheath and located thereon, the positioning of the barbs will enable the cap ends to exert holding and sealing pressure on the glazing panels.

It is to be noted that the angle of the sides of the roof beam of FIGS. 1 and 2 to the vertical when in position can be chosen to correspond with the pitch of the roof being constructed. That has the advantage that in forming a roof with jack rafters, the jack rafters are able to abut the main roof beams without any overhang visible form below.

It is envisaged that the roof beams 4 may be mounted between a ridge beam and eaves beam by any suitable means, although it is to be noted that the hollow nature of the roof beam allows for fitting of roof beam connectors that can cooperate with formations of a ridge and/or eaves beam for ease of fitting. Preferably such connectors permit snap fitting with cooperating formations of ridge and/or eaves beams.

Turning to FIGS. 4 and 5 of the accompanying drawings, a first jack rafter connector part 70 is moulded of plastics material and had a body 72 that is trapezoidal in section having a wider top 74 and narrower bottom 76, connecting sides 78 and 80 and end faces 82 and 84. One end face 82 is at a first angle relative to a longitudinal axis of the connector part and the other end face 84 is at a different relative angle. The end faces 82 and 84 each have an elongate slot 85 therein with the longest dimension thereof parallel to the top and bottom walls 74 and 76 respectively of the body. The connector part 70 also has a screw port or bolt aperture 88 for receiving a securing screw or bolt 104 through a roof beam.

The differently angled end faces of the connector are provided so that the connector can be used either way around depending on whether the jack rafter is for a Victorian style roof (end face 84) or a Georgian style roof (end face 82). The connector part 70 is shown in its Georgian style orientation fitted in a jack rafter roof beam in FIG. 8 of the accompanying drawings. As shown the end face 82 is set back slightly from the end of the roof beam, so that the jack rafter when connected to another roof beam abuts that roof beam.

The other jack rafter connector part 90 is shown in FIGS. 6 and 7 of the accompanying drawings and comprises a circular plate 92 with a pair of diametrically spaced 94 studs on its rear face. Extending from the opposite face of the plate is a toggle 96, which is shaped to fit through the slot 85 of the first connector part 70 in one orientation. With the toggle 96 fitted through the slot 85, rotation of the first connector part will lock the two connector parts together.

The second connector part 90 has a through hole 98, whereby the connector part can be affixed to a roof beam by means of a screw or the like. To position the second connector part correctly and to prevent it from rotating, two holes are drilled in the side of a roof beam to match the two studs 94.

As shown in FIG. 8, the first connector part is positioned in the end of a roof beam section to form a jack rafter 7 and the second connector part 90 is fixed to the roof beam 4, to which the jack rafter is to be connected with the toggle 96 orientated to have its longest dimension transverse to the direction of the roof beam. The jack rafter 7 is then offered upto the second connector part at 90° to its intended fitted orientation, so that the toggle enters the slot, and then the jack rafter is rotated through 90° to lock the rafter to the roof beam. At its other end, the jack rafter is connected to the eaves of the roof by any suitable means, including, for example, by means of a snap-fit connector as described in our co-pending patent application (P5135).

Turning to FIGS. 10 to 12 of the accompanying drawings, to retain the sheath 18 on the glazing bar 16 of a jack rafter 7, a spring clip 100 may be fixed to the underside of the glazing bar using the bolt 104 that holds the jack rafter connector part 70 in the glazing bar. The spring clip has a base 106 and a shorter angled upstand 108. The base 106 has an aperture 110 for attachment thereof by means of the bolt 104.

The angled upstand 108 is arranged with its free end facing the direction in which the sheath 18 is slid onto the glazing bar, so that it inhibits reverse movement of the sheath.

Where the cap 20 of a jack rafter 7 meets the cap of a main roof beam, there can be a gap, through which water can ingress. In order to prevent water ingress, as shown in FIGS. 13 to 16 of the accompanying drawings, a flashing trim 120 is provided that slides onto the main roof beam cap 20. The flashing trim has a base 122 with chamfered ends 124, which facilitate sliding of the flashing trim onto the cap and drainage. Extending upwardly from the base 122 is a pair of parallel upstands 126, 128, the first upstand 126 being generally central of the base. The first upstand has an upper part 130 leaning towards the other upstand 128. The other upstand 128 has a lip 132 extending towards the first upstand to form a narrow gap for gripping the side of the cap. On the underside of the base 122 is a pair of tabs 134 that locate between the glazing panels 8 supported on the roof beam.