Title:
Shear wall template
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A template for use in constructing shear panels in the construction trade, and its method of use permitting precise positioning of nails or other fasteners in attaching shear panels to other construction members, thus facilitating and accelerating the framing of building structures.



Inventors:
Debene, Michael (Danville, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/181654
Publication Date:
01/18/2007
Filing Date:
07/13/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/167.3
International Classes:
E04B1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, CHI Q
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John Nielsen (PLEASANTON, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A template for use in constructing shear walls comprising: a. Pre printed markings on the template that indicate target locations for the placement of nails or other fasteners.

2. A template as in claim 1 wherein: a. One or more sides of the template comprise an adhesive.

3. A template as in claim 1 wherein the template also comprises a center line along the middle of the template.

4. A template as in claim 1 wherein the template also comprises edge aligning markings for positioning of the template along framing members.

5. A template as in claim 1 wherein the pre printed markings are arranged in a plurality of staggered rows.

6. A template as in claim 1 wherein the pre printed markings comprise one or more colors that indicate one or more patterns for use in constructing shear walls.

7. A template as in claim 1 wherein said pre printed markings are numbered.

8. A method of constructing a shear wall comprising: a. Applying a template onto one or more panels i. The template comprising pre printed markings that indicate target locations for the placement of nails or other fasteners. b. Using the template to identify intended locations for installation of nails or other fasteners; c. Affixing the panel to framing members with nails or other fasteners at locations marked on the template.

Description:

A. TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a template for use in constructing shear panels in the construction trade, and its method of use permitting precise positioning of nails or other fasteners in attaching panels to other construction members, thus facilitating and accelerating the construction of shear walls.

B. DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

Various devices have been heretofore provided to assist the carpenter in the framing and construction of building structures. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,367,783 discloses a layout template tool that facilitates the marking of the positions of studs, joists, rafters, and trusses before these building components are nailed into a permanent position. A problem with these layout tools is that they are usually constructed of metal members, are cumbersome to use, require the user to use a pencil to mark desired locations, are difficult to transport, have moving parts that can be lost rendering the tool inoperative, and their measuring markings wear out with periodic use often resulting in improper measurement markings. The tools also have restricted use when used close to other walls or building components, because the tool is rigid and cannot be bent around corners.

Templates made of flat flexible thick material having adhesives thereon are also known in the cabinetry trade and other trades and an example of such is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 5,666,737. Such tapes are used at precise locations to indicate the position of holes when making cabinetry that require precision hardware to be installed thereon. Such templates have therefore limited use. It is also known to use templates in the construction of housing development where repetitious measures are utilized and such a system is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,573,302. Such templates have again restricted usage and are not practical as a measuring tool for all sorts of building structures.

There is also a need in the prior art to provide a template that is securable on building surfaces to identify locations wherein nails or other fasteners may be installed directly on the templates at precise locations.

There is also a need to provide a template that is easy to use, that is economical, and that accelerates construction.

Another example is U.S. Pat. No. 6,494,014 that describes a framing template that assists the user to position building components relative to other framing members. However, the prior art has not disclosed a template device that successfully alleviates the difficulties involved in the construction and inspection of shear walls.

C. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the construction arts, a shear wall is a rigid vertical diaphragm capable of transferring lateral forces from exterior walls, floors, and roofs to the ground foundation in a direction parallel to their planes.

Examples are the reinforced-concrete wall or vertical truss. Lateral forces caused by wind, earthquake, and uneven settlement loads, in addition to the weight of structure and occupants, create powerful twisting forces. These forces can literally tear (shear) a building apart. Reinforcing a frame by attaching or placing a rigid wall inside it maintains the shape of the frame and prevents rotation at the joints.

In many areas, building codes require the use of a specially designed shear wall and/or specific nailing requirements. Shear walls are sometimes made on site, typically following the specific recommendations of an architect or structural engineer who has calculated the loads on the building and designed the wall accordingly. A shear wall may consist of an area where plywood is used on one or even both sides of the wall, or where the plywood is affixed to the studs and fastened in a specific pattern with nails or staples of a specific size. The details vary, depending on the situation and the forces and loads involved.

Wood shear walls provide the primary lateral resistance in many residential and commercial structures. Nailed wood framing and sheathing panels allows the wall to transfer in-plane forces through diaphragm action into supports and foundations. The overall strength and behavior of wall is determined by the individual behavior of the nailed sheathing connections. The prior art has long recognized that flexible measuring tapes, such as canvas measuring tapes or flexible metal measuring tapes, may be advantageously employed in a plethora of common applications. However, the necessity of holding these devices stationary in order to obtain a true measurement often renders their use awkward, particularly where no assistance is available and large distances must be measured. Moreover; the use of these devices entails a manual measurement operation, which can be very time consuming and a significant source of costly errors, particularly in construction applications, where a large number of measurements must be made over long distances. Such layout procedures involve reading-off and measuring from graduated and numerically marked measuring devices and almost invariably involve dimensions that must be applied cumulatively. Reading or arithmetic mistakes are easily made, and such errors can have serious consequences, since these errors are cumulative. Accordingly, the deficiencies associated with these devices render their use for many operations, such as construction applications, undesirable.

Typically, shear walls are installed in the rushed and chaotic setting of construction zone, where precise measurements do not always occur. This can create problems if the intended nailing pattern for the wall is not followed, in that the wall may have to be re-nailed or replaced, or perhaps worse, allowed to remain with incorrect nailing. An improperly nailed shear wall may fail to perform as designed.

D. OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved device that eliminates the necessity for manual measurements, is easily usable by a single workman, and does not require the use of an additional measuring device therewith.

One object of the invention is to provide a flexible measuring template for marking the intended locations of nails or other fasteners in shear walls (shear panels). The invention may comprise a self adhesive, or it may be affixed to the construction member (e.g. panel) with a staple, tack, or any other method. The invention may comprise a first indicia of a center line oriented vertically along the template. The center line is intended to be located at the edge of a panel or at the intersection of two or more panels, and in the middle of a stud. A second series of indicia mark a pattern designed to identify intended locations of the nails (or target markings) when nailing the panel to the stud.

Preferably, the template will have target markings on one or both sides of the center line, and in a staggered pattern as commonly required by residential and commercial building codes. The target markings for the nailing pattern can be spaced at pre-determined intervals and locations such that nails, or other fasteners, if nailed in the locations of the target markings, would conform to applicable building code requirements for shear walls.

Another object of the invention is to allow the user of the invention to leave the template in place after use. Not only will this allow the user to save time by not requiring the removal of the template, this ability will also allow for ease of inspection after the shear wall has been installed and completed.

One object of the invention is to allow for fast and accurate inspections of the nailing/securing of shear walls. Traditionally, contractors, or governmental officials charged with inspecting the framing of a building, must assess whether the shear panels have been properly secured to other building members, such as studs. These inspections typically take a significant amount of time and effort to assess whether the panels were secured with the proper nailing pattern. These inspections typically involve manual measurements and mathematical calculations, both of which are subject to error. The invention described herein, by allowing the template to remain in place after installation of the shear wall, allows for faster and more accurate inspections by allowing the inspector to merely compare the nailing pattern to the pre-printed target markings on the template.

One embodiment of the invention incorporates a color coding system such that different spacing patterns use different colors. This would allow for one roll of tape to have more than one nailing pattern contained on the roll, thus making it more versatile. For instance, a nailing pattern with one indicia of measurement could be marked in one color, and a second nailing pattern with a second indicia of measurement could be marked in a second color.

Another embodiment of the invention incorporates a coding system that uses different shapes to distinguish between the target markings of one or more different nailing patterns. For example, one nailing pattern could use squares as target markings, while another nailing pattern could use circles or triangles. An advantage of this embodiment is that multiple nailing patterns could be printed onto the same tape with less chance of confusion by the user. This embodiment also adds to the versatility of the invention.

In another embodiment, the template would have edge markings along the two vertical sides and a stagger pattern of target markings. This would allow a template that may not utilize the center line as described in previous embodiments. This embodiment would also be readily amenable to applying to the edges of individual shear panels, either before or after the panels are placed against the support member (e.g. stud).

The pre-printed pattern of the target markings desired by the user may depend on a variety of factors, including the type of wood being used, the types and sizes of nails being used, and the load requirements. As such, it is anticipated that a variety of template sizes and patterns of target markings will be utilized in this invention.

It is also anticipated that when constructing the shear panels, a small gap will be left between the panels to allow for expansion and contraction of the wood panels. Therefore, it is also anticipated that the center line, of the embodiment of this invention that has a center line, will be placed between the panels in the gap between them.

It is a feature of this invention to provide that the pre-printed markings can utilize a variety of measurement systems, including, but not limited to English and metric.

E. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Various embodiments of the present invention will now be described with references to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is a front view showing an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template and an indicated location for the placement of same at the juncture of two shear panels which are adjacent to a support member.

FIG. 2 is a front view showing an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template placed vertically at the juncture of two shear panels.

FIG. 3 is a front view showing an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template placed horizontally at the juncture of two shear panels.

FIG. 4 is a front view of an embodiment of a single stagger line shear wall template placed along the edge of a shear panel.

FIG. 5 is a front view of an embodiment of a single stagger line shear wall template placed vertically along the edge of a shear panel that is located at a support member.

FIG. 6 is a front view of an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 2-½ inches in total width.

FIG. 7 is a front view of an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 3-½ inches in total width.

FIG. 8 is a front view of an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 3-½ inches in total width.

FIG. 9 is a front view of an embodiment of a single stagger line shear wall template.

F. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

As illustrated in FIG. 1, two panels 100 are placed approximately adjacent to each other. The adjacent edges to the two panels 100 are placed along the approximate midline of the stud/support member 102. Preferably, a small gap is left between the panels to allow for expansion and contraction of the panels after installation. The broken vertical lines on the panels show the projected location 112 of the template 106 after application. As shown, the template 106 can be placed on the panels 100 such that it covers the adjacent edges of the panels. Preferably, in the case of the double stagger line embodiment, the width of the template matches the width of the support member (e.g. stud). The template 106 is shown, partially unrolled, with the arrows indicating the projected location of the template after installation. The dots on the template 106 show an example of the target locations for the nails or other fasteners the user chose to use to affix the panel to the support member. It is anticipated that the center line 108 on the template will be placed along the center line of the stud or other support member. As such, if a gap is left between the panels 100 during installation, the center line 108 of the template can run along that gap between the panels. The template also shows the edge lines 110 located along the sides of the template 106.

FIG. 2 depicts the scenario of FIG. 1 after installation of the template 106 along the projected location 112 identified in FIG. 1. The center line 108 on the template runs along the small gap between the panels, and the edge lines 110 on the template approximately match the width of the support member 102 (e.g. stud). At this stage of installation, the template has identified the appropriate target locations for the nails, and the framer may permanently affix the panels 100 to the stud 102 by placing the nails at the target locations and nailing through the template and panel 100 and into the stud 102. It is anticipated that other methods of installing the nails or other fasteners can be used, such as using a nail gun, or other device or practice. Once the nails are installed at the desired locations, the template can remain. An objective of this invention is to allow for faster and easier inspections of shear wall construction. When the template remains in place after installation, these inspections are made easier in that an inspector can compare the target pattern on the template with the in place nails.

As illustrated in FIG. 3, two shear panels 100 are placed approximately adjacent to each other, such that the edges are aligned horizontally (or parallel to the floor/ceiling). FIG. 3 depicts the double stagger line embodiment, where in this case the width of the template 106 placed onto the panels matches the width of the support member 102.

FIG. 4 shows a single stagger line template 106 being affixed to an edge of a single shear panel 100. The template also shows the edge lines 110 located along the sides of the template. An advantage of the single stagger line template is that it allows the user to place the template 106 on the individual panels 100 prior to the panels being erected.

FIG. 5 depicts a single stagger line template 106 located at the edge of a shear panel 100. The edge of the panel 100 is located along the approximate midline of the stud 102. The template 100 also shows the edge lines 110 located along the sides of the template 106. It is anticipated that the single stagger line template can be left on the panel 100 after the panel is permanently affixed to the stud 102. This will allow for faster and more reliable inspections of the nailing pattern used to affix the panel to the stud or other support member.

FIG. 6. depicts an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 2-½ inches in total width. It is anticipated that this embodiment may be used at the juncture of shear panels where the support member consists of a 3 x 4 inch nominal support member. (actual size of 2-½ inches wide). In this configuration, the center line 108 is located 1-¼ inches from the edge lines 110 of the template. This embodiment depicts 4 rows of target markings 114. One row is located ⅜ inch from the topmost edge line 110 of the template. A second row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch above the center line 108. A third row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch below the center line 108. A fourth row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch from the bottom edge line 110 of the template. The target markings of the top two rows are staggered, as well as the target markings on the bottom two rows.

FIG. 7. depicts an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 3-½ inches in total width. It is anticipated that this embodiment may be used at the juncture of shear panels where the support member consists of a 4 x 4 inch nominal support member (actual size of 3-½ inches wide). In this configuration, the center line is located 1-¾ inches from the edges 110 of the template. This embodiment depicts 6 rows of target markings 114. One row is located ⅜ inch from the topmost edge 110 of the template. A second row of target markings 114 is located ⅞ inch from the topmost edge 110 of the template. A third row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch above the center line 108. A fourth row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch below the center line 108. A fifth row of target markings 114 is located ⅞ inch from the bottom edge 110 of the template. A sixth row of target markings 114 is located ⅜ inch from the bottom edge of the template 110. The target markings of the top three rows are staggered, as well as the target markings on the bottom three rows.

FIG. 8. depicts an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is 3-½ inches in total width. It is anticipated that this embodiment may be used at the juncture of panels where the support member consists of a 4×4 inch nominal support member (actual size of 3-½ inches wide). In this configuration, the center line 108 is located 1-¾ inches from the edges 110 of the template. This embodiment depicts 4 rows of target markings. One row is located ½ inch from the topmost edge 110 of the template. A second row of target markings is located ½ inch above the center line 108. The third row of target markings is located ½ inch below the center line 108. The fourth row of target markings is located ½ inch from the bottom edge 110 of the template. The target markings of the top two rows are staggered, as well as the target markings on the bottom two rows.

FIG. 9. depicts an embodiment of a double stagger line shear wall template that is either 2-½ or 3-½ inches in total width. It is anticipated that this embodiment may be used at the juncture of panels where the support member consists of a 3×4 or 4×4 inch nominal support member (actual size of 2-½ inches or 3-½ inches wide, respectively). In this configuration, there is no center line designated on the template.