Title:
Truss mounted rooftop fall protection system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A J shaped stanchion which attaches to a roof truss (or rafter) in such a manner as to enable the entire girth of the roof truss overhang (or rafter) to be the sole support for the stanchion. The enveloping connection is designed to exceed the 200 pound minimum impact currently required by OSHA for a slide guard or guardrail. This stanchion is designed to bend below the fascia and return up above the roof surface where successive stanchions similarly attached are connected via a fall protection guardtails providing fall protection for all workers. This single point of attachment allows the carpenters to attach the stanchions prior to hoisting the trusses onto the roof bearing walls. As soon as the trusses are properly braced, the guardrails can be hoisted and secured.



Inventors:
Martinez, Rafael (Tampa, FL, US)
Martinez, Joseph A. (Brandon, FL, US)
Harrison, James (Lithia, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/177009
Publication Date:
01/11/2007
Filing Date:
07/07/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04H17/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MACARTHUR, VICTOR L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Wayne V. Harper (Tampa, FL, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A fall protection stanchion comprising: a bracket arm having a first end and a second end; the bracket arm comprising a J-shaped structure with a first end on a lower part, and a second end on a higher part; the first end on the lower part comprising an attachment bracket; the attachment bracket further comprising an upper rear flange, an upper front flange, a lower flange, and a securing plate; the securing plate further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices; the second end on the higher part comprising a slide arrest guardrail bracket; the slide arrest guardrail bracket further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices.

2. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 1, wherein said attachment bracket, with said securing bracket and said flanges attaches to an overhang portion of a roof member.

3. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 2, wherein the securing bracket further attaches to said overhang portion of the roof member with an attaching means through said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices thus enveloping said roof member on at least three sides.

4. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 1 wherein said slide arrest guardrail bracket with said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices attaches to a fall protection guardrail.

5. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 4, wherein said fall protection guardrail is a rope, a strap, a net, or a plank.

6. We claim a fall protection system comprising at least two fall protection stanchions and at least one slide arrest guardrail, with each stanchion comprising: a bracket arm having a first end and a second end; the bracket arm comprising a J-shaped structure with a first end on a lower part, and a second end on a higher part; the first end on the lower part comprising an attachment bracket; the attachment bracket further comprising an upper rear flange, an upper front flange, a lower flange, and a securing plate; the securing plate further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices; the second end on the higher part comprising a slide arrest guardrail bracket; the slide arrest guardrail bracket further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices.

7. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 6, wherein said attachment bracket, with said securing bracket and said flanges attaches to an overhang portion of a roof member.

8. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 7, wherein the securing bracket further attaches to said overhang portion of the roof member with an attaching means through said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices thus enveloping said roof member on at least three sides.

9. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 6 wherein said slide arrest guardrail bracket with said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices attaches to a fall protection guardrail.

10. The fall protection system as recited in claim 9 wherein the slide arrest guardrail is a rope, a strap, a net, or plank.

11. We claim a fall protection guardrail comprising at least two fall protection stanchions and a plurality of guardrails, with each stanchion comprising: a bracket arm having a first end and a second end; the bracket arm comprising a J-shaped structure with a first end on a lower part, and a second end on a higher part; the first end on the lower part comprising an attachment bracket; the attachment bracket further comprising an upper rear flange, an upper front flange, a lower flange, and a securing plate; the securing plate further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices; the second end on the higher part comprising a slide arrest guardrail bracket; the slide arrest guardrail bracket further comprising an attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices. the second and higher end further comprising an extended bracket arm comprising intermediate guardrail bracket(s) and a top guardrail bracket each with an attachment orifice or a plurality of attachment orifices.

12. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 11, wherein said attachment bracket, with said securing bracket and said flanges attaches to an overhang portion of a roof member.

13. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 12, wherein the securing bracket further attaches to said overhang portion of the roof member with an attaching means through said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices thus enveloping said roof member on at least three sides.

14. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claim 11, wherein said slide arrest guardrail bracket with said attachment orifice or plurality of attachment orifices attaches to a fall protection guardrail.

15. The fall protection guardrail as recited in claim 14, wherein the guardrails are planks or any combination of ropes, straps, nets, planks or other.

16. The fall protection guardrail as recited in claim 14, wherein the extended bracket arm is integral or removable.

17. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claims 2 wherein said truss overhang attachment bracket is double-sided, thus capable of securing the stanchion to either side of the overhang portion of a roof member.

18. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claims 7 wherein said truss overhang attachment bracket is double-sided, thus capable of securing the stanchion to either side of the overhang portion of a roof member.

19. The fall protection stanchion claimed in claims 12 wherein said truss overhang attachment bracket is double-sided, thus capable of securing the stanchion to either side of the overhang portion of a roof member.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not applicable.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not applicable.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to fall protection devices and systems which are attached to roofs of structures under construction. More particularly, this invention relates to fall protection devices and systems which are mounted on trusses or rafters of structures under construction, but are not attached to the fascia of such structures.

2. Description of the Problem

The Occupational Safety and Health Act mandates that every trade who must build or stand on a roof surface should have fall protection. At the very minimum a slide guard should be in place to protect the worker. The minimum slide guard is described as a two by four nominal dimension member secured on its' edge, to the roof, below the worker, to arrest his possible slide. Many trades must stand on a sloped roof to accomplish their work. Some of these trades are, the framing carpenter, the roofer, (and on roofs with multiple levels), the window installer, the house wrap installer, the siding installer, exterior trim carpenter, the soffit installer, the lathers, the stucco crew, the list could go on and on.

In practice, the framing carpenter installs a slide guard on the roof surface and it is removed when the framing is finished, since it becomes an obstacle to some subsequent trades. In practice the guards are seldom replaced. There exists a need to overcome the shortcomings of conventional fall protection devices.

3. Description of Related Art

There is some prior art which addresses this problem. However, the art which is most likely to address this concern are those with stanchions which attach to a truss below the roof line, dip down below the fascia and up above the roof and also attach to the fascia. There are at least four deficiencies with this multiple attachment. For one, a building designed with no fascia, may not use these systems. Secondly, where the fascia is the finished product, this art would damage the fascia, and it could not be used. Thirdly, where the roofing requires a metal eave drip to be installed before roofing, the fascia connection may have to be removed, rendering this system inoperable. And finally, if they are to be used at all these stanchions cannot be properly attached until the fascia is constructed. Specific devices also suffer from other deficiencies.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,345,689 to McNamee (2002). In abstract states “The shorter leg of each stanchion engages the underside of one of the rafters and extends downward lay there from, the longer leg of each stanchion is interconnected with the roofs fascia board by a fascia board mounting clamp and extends upwardly from the roof, while the interconnecting portion between the above noted legs extends under the fascia board.” The additional attachment to the fascia required by McNamee presents many problems. In many cases where the fascia is the finished product, the fascia would be damaged by the fascia board mounting clamp. Where the architecture requires no fascia, the McNamee stanchion could not be used. Where the roof framing requires a sub fascia, the McNamee stanchion would have to be removed prior to the installation of a finished wooden fascia with metal eave drip, leaving the roofers and other workers following the removal without fall protection.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,221,076 to Zust (1993) uses a fall protection system attached with roof anchors directly into a roof gutter system. With this system the gutter and anchors must be in place, which interferes with the roofing process. This system cannot be used with new construction.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,353,891 to Griek Et. AI (1994) uses an assembly where the unit can only be used on a steel frame structure.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,573,227 to Hemauer (1996) in abstract states that “the bracket part of each stanchion is attached to the fascia board and also to a rafter of the building frame. Thus spreading the force caused by a falling person or large object between both fascia and rafters, providing maximum strength.” Hemauer also states “in no way interfere with the complete roof process, including gutter.” The additional attachment to the fascia required by Hemauer presents many problems. In many cases where the fascia is the finished product, the fascia would be damaged by the fascia mounting bracket part. Where the architecture requires no fascia, the Hemauer stanchion could not be used. Where the roof framing requires a sub fascia, the Hemauer stanchion would have to be removed prior to the installation of a finished wooden fascia with metal eave drip, leaving the roofers and other workers following the removal without fall protection.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,570,559 to Lewis (1996). The device can only be installed on a wood frame building and does not allow exterior finish to go on until roof is complete.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,666,131 to Kettlekamp and Shafstall (1987). The illustrations show a two bolt pattern secured thru the rafter tail, the application of extreme force could split the rafter tail. The complexity of the design and the multiple parts renders this design expensive and difficult to manufacture and assemble.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,067,586 to Myers (1991). The completion of both the roofing and siding processes are compromised by interference of the components of the device.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,669,577 to Werner (1987). The patent states that a screw clamp is to be used to attach the bracket to the structure and is best suited for structures that have a floor comprised of concrete.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,901.481 to Probst (1975) This unit is comprised of a roof plate nailed to the roof under shingles and may not be installed prior to partial sheathing.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,359,851 to Daniels (1982) illustrations show, a side mounted post bracket attached to the horizontal board of a deck platform. Prior to this installation the fascia, sheathing, edging, and bottom row of shingles must be installed.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The preferred embodiment of this invention is a J shaped stanchion which attaches to a roof truss (or rafter) in such a manner as to enable the entire girth of the roof truss overhang (or rafter) to be the sole support for the stanchion. The enveloping connection is designed to exceed the 200 pound minimum impact currently required by OSHA for a slide guard or guardrail. This stanchion is designed to bend below the fascia and return up above the roof surface where successive stanchions similarly attached are connected via fall protection guardrails providing fall protection for all workers. This single point of attachment allows the carpenters to attach the stanchions prior to hoisting the trusses onto the roof bearing walls. As soon as the trusses are properly braced, the guardrails can be hoisted and secured. This feature of the preferred embodiment has the potential of protecting every single worker during the entire construction process of the structure which involves working on the roof When all workers are safely off the roof the stanchions are easily removed and reused.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1. is a side elevation view of one embodiment of a stanchion guardrail member.

FIG. 2. is a side view of the stanchion guardrail member shown in FIG. 1 attached to a truss of a building with a square cut fascia.

FIG. 3. is a side view of the stanchion guardrail member shown in FIG. 1 attached to a truss of a building with a plumb cut fascia.

FIG. 4. is a perspective view of three stanchion guardrail members shown in FIG. 1 attached to the trusses of a building.

FIG. 5. is a side elevation view of another embodiment of a stanchion guardrail member with a removable bracket arm extension.

FIG. 6. is a side elevation view of another embodiment of a stanchion guardrail member.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Note that in the following detailed description, the drawings are referred to using a consistent labeling scheme. That is to say, a particular component that is visible in multiple drawings is referred to using the same label on every drawing. For example, the label 17 refers to the stanchion bracket arm of the preferred embodiment. Descriptions referring to a label in a specific drawing apply to the same label in all other drawings in which the same label appears unless specifically noted to the contrary.

The labels for the drawings are briefly defined as follows. Detailed discussion of the structure and function of critical components of the invention follow in ensuing paragraphs. 1, the stanchion as a whole; 2, a truss overhang attachment bracket; 2A, the upper rear flange of the attachment bracket; 2B, the upper front flange of the attachment bracket; 2C, the securing plate of the attachment bracket; 2D, the lower flange of the attachment bracket; 3, a slide arrest guardrail bracket; 4, attachment orifices in brackets 3 and 4; 5, a horizontal slide arrest guardrail; 6, the fascia of a structure or building; 7, the sub-fascia of a structure or building; 8, the metal eave drip of a structure or building; 9, the shingles or roofing of a structure or building; 10, plywood or roof decking of a structure or building; 11, a rafter, roof truss, or roof member of a structure or building; 12, a truss nail plate, 13, siding or exterior cladding of a structure or building; 14, a wall of a structure or building; 15, a structure or building as a whole; 16, welds used to attach a bracket to the bracket arm; 17, a bracket arm; 18, a roof edge of a structure or building; 19, slide arrest guardrail brackets; 21, a bracket arm extension.

Referring first to FIG. 1, the stanchion guardrail member 1 includes a truss overhang attachment bracket 2, a main stanchion bracket arm 17, and slide arrest guardrail bracket 3. The attachment bracket 2 is comprised of an upper rear flange 2A, an upper front flange 2B, a lower flange 2D, which are all attached to a securing plate 2C. The securing plate 2C is perforated by one or more orifices which permit the bolts, nails, or other means of attachment to pass through the securing plate 2C. All of the components of the bracket are formed of flat stock steel. The main stanchion bracket arm 17 is formed of square stock tubing and bent 180 degrees. The stanchion bracket arm 17 is affixed to the lower flange of attachment bracket 2D of truss overhang attachment bracket 2 by a weld 16. A slide arrest guardrail bracket 3 is formed of flat stock steel and bent so as to accept a nominal two times nominal six (or higher) horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 (see FIG. 4) is affixed by a weld 16 on the upper most section extending up to main stanchion bracket arm 17 and facing roof-ward toward the truss overhang attachment bracket 2.

Referring next to FIG. 2, the stanchion designated 1 and its attachments to a structure or building 15 are shown in a cross section with square cut fascia. The drawing illustrates that the truss overhang attachment bracket 2 is properly fastened by nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent on either side of a roof truss 11. Where nails, bolts, screws, bolts, and their equivalents are used to secure the attachment bracket 2 to a roof truss 11, such means are inserted through the orifices 4 in the attachment bracket 2 and into the adjacent truss. Stanchions 1 are consecutively installed on roof trusses 11 along the horizontal roof edge 18. The strength of this attachment is due to the envelopment of the roof truss 11 with the upper rear flange of attachment bracket 2A, the upper front flange of attachment bracket 2B and the lower flange of attachment bracket 2D and the securing plate of attachment bracket 2C causing the entire truss 11 to react as one with stanchion 1 on impact. The main stanchion bracket arm 17 is bent 180 degrees so as to insure slide arrest guardrail bracket 3 to be perpendicular to the plane of the roof regardless of roof pitch.

Referring next to FIG. 3, the stanchion designated 1 and its attachments to a structure or building 15 are shown in a cross section with plumb cut fascia. The drawing illustrates that the truss overhang attachment bracket 2 is properly fastened by nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent on either side of a roof truss 11. Where nails, bolts, screws, bolts, and their equivalents are used to secure the attachment bracket 2 to a roof truss 11, such means are inserted through the orifices 4 in the attachment bracket 2 and into the adjacent truss. Stanchions 1 are consecutively installed on roof trusses 11 along the horizontal roof edge 18. The strength of this attachment is due to the envelopment of the roof truss 11 with the upper rear flange of attachment bracket 2A, the upper front flange of attachment bracket 2B and the lower flange of attachment bracket 2D and the securing plate of attachment bracket 2C causing the entire truss 11 to react as one with stanchion 1 on impact. The main stanchion bracket arm 17 is bent 180 degrees so as to insure slide arrest guardrail bracket 3 to be perpendicular to the plane of the roof regardless of roof pitch.

Referring next to FIG. 4, the stanchions 1 are consecutively installed on roof truss overhangs 11 along horizontal roof edge 18. Stanchions 1 are fastened by nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent to truss overhang attachment bracket 2 and horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 is fastened by nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent to slide arrest guardrail bracket 3 thus creating a continuous two times six (or higher) horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 as a means of limiting the uncontrolled slide of workers.

Referring next to FIG. 5, the stanchion guardrail 1 can be extended with a removable bracket arm extension 21 extending above the slide arrest guardrail bracket 3. The slide arrest guardrail bracket 19 of the removable bracket arm extension 21 is formed of flat stock steel and bent so as to accept a nominal two times nominal six (or higher) slide arrest guardrail 5 (see FIG. 4), affixed by weld 16 on the upper most section extending up to main stanchion bracket arm 17 and facing roof-ward toward truss overhang attachment bracket 2. FIG. 6 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the device illustrated in FIG. 5 in which the extension arm replaced by a fixed, permanent extension of the stanchion bracket arm 17.

The operation of the preferred embodiment of the invention is as follows. Referring to FIG. 3., the stanchion 1, is attached only to the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 and is attached up to two inches from horizontal roof edge 18. The truss overhang attachment bracket 2, is comprised of the upper rear flange 2A, the upper front flange 2B, the securing plate 2C, and the lower flange 2D. Working in concert with its comprised parts the truss overhang attachment bracket 2, envelopes the girth of rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, and once stanchion 1 is attached at securing plate 2C, by means of nailing, and or screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent, no additional points of attachment are necessary. Since this is the only necessary connection to rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, it becomes evident that the ideal location for this connection is on the ground before the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 is hoisted onto the wall 14. Ground level installation has many advantages, the installation can be more precise, is easy to install, and due to the firm footing of ground level installation, the occurrences of injury from heights (ladders, scaffolding, lift equipment, etc.) is eliminated.

Ground level installation of the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, and FIG. 6, greatly reduces the work time involved in assembly, and allows the system to be principally assembled prior to the workman being in peril. Immediately after rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 is hoisted onto structure 15, FIG. 4, the horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 can be hoisted up and secured. Therefore fall protection can be in position prior to the installation of the first sheathing/roof decking and if used until all roof operations are complete, it will provide the absolute time maximum uninterrupted fall guard protection possible.

Under construction practices known to date, current brackets/slide guards are installed on the wall, or in the truss web or on the roof itself, from a ladder, scaffolding, lift equipment or any other known equivalent. In addition other systems require multiple points of attachment and require the unprotected construction of some of the roof structure, such as the fascia, before roof fall protection becomes effective.

The process of ground level installation, although preferred, does not limit the attachment of the fall protection stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, in other situations, such as existing structures, or in conventional framing, i.e., framing in which the construction of the structure must be built in the field, on the job site, such as hips, dormers, or any other roof or balcony configuration as is known to one of ordinary skill in the art. Such alternative attachments may require the use of additional equipment (ladders, scaffolding, lift equipment, etc.).

Optional dimensions of attachment bracket 2 are available to accommodate other nominal sizes of rafter, roof truss, roof member 11, or for any architecturally specified size rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11.

Once stanchion 1, FIG. 4, is properly attached to the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, and the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 is properly affixed to building 15, a slide arrest guardrail 5 may be installed, forming a continuous barrier around the perimeter of the roof. Such guardrail 5 may be composed of a nominal 2× wood plank, a metal member, a crossbar, a rope, a strap, mesh netting or any known equivalent. The slide arrest guardrail 5 may be strung or inserted through the slide arrest guard bracket 3 and may be optionally fixed in place by means of nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, or bolting the strap to the bracket 3, such nails, screws, bolts and equivalents, passing through the orifices 4 in the bracket 3.

The fall protection devices stanchion 1, FIG. 4, are secured to adjacent manufactured rafter, roof trusses or roof member 11 at horizontal roof edge 18, they extend down below the fascia 6 location and up above the horizontal roof edge 18 where the 2× wood plank, metal member, crossbar, mesh netting or any known equivalent, horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 is attached to the slide arrest guard rail bracket 3 FIG. 1 by means of nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent and thus becomes the barrier which a sliding workman would contact thus preventing the workman from sliding off of the roof.

The fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 4, holds the horizontal slide arrest guard rail 5, perpendicular to the roof surface (Refer to Code of Federal Regulations, pt. 1929, Subpt. M, App.E, 29 CFR ch, XVII (Jul. 1, 2002 Edition, paragraph 12). “After the bottom row of roof sheathing is installed, a slide guard extending the width of the roof shall be securely attached to the roof. Slide guards are to be constructed of no less than nominal 4″ height capable of limiting the uncontrolled slide of the workers. Workers shall install the slide guard while standing in the truss webs and leaning over the sheathing.” These fall protection device stanchions 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, exceeds this minimum OSHA guideline and becomes the foundation for additional fall protection.

This fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, or FIG. 6, attaches directly to the truss tail, and does not touch the fascia 6; therefore there is no interference with the process of snapping a line from the first rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, to the last rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, for the purpose of determining which horizontal roof edge 18, do not line up. At this point said roof edge 18 can be saw cut straight for a square cut 6, FIG. 2, or plumb cut 6, FIG. 3, fascia without interference from the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2 or FIG. 3, thus allowing the attachment of the fascia 6. Due to the encompassing features of the rafter attachment bracket 2, fascia optional architecture (open design with no fascia) still allows continuous fall protection for workman.

The continuous row of the J shaped bracket arms 17, FIG. 4, mounted along the horizontal roof edge 18, allows a useful area in their inner radii for the temporary support of long stock materials, (i.e., fascia stock material or sub fascia stock material) thus providing a safer environ for the installation of the fascia 6. Once the fascia 6 is attached and horizontal slide arrest guardrail 5 is properly fastened by nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent; the sheathing process may begin. Therefore the safety of workers is enhanced even before stanchion 1 begins providing fall protection.

Depending on the pitch and or overall size of a roof, OSHA requires additional slide guards at specific intervals going up the roof. As the sheathing or roofing progresses the stanchion 1, FIG. 4, can be used as a brace against which a grid of additional 2× supports and slide guards can be constructed with minimal or no penetration of the roofing surface.

The fall protection device stanchion 1 FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, remains attached to the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, FIG. 4, thus allowing all trades which may have to work on the roof surface, such as framers, roofers, plumbers, HVAC, electricians, window installers, siding installers, soffit installers, etc. to complete all work necessary while assuring continuous fall protection for all workman.

The truss overhang attachment bracket 2, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, encompasses the rafter, roof truss, or roof member overhang 11, in such a manner as to allow the girth of the rafter, roof truss ,or roof member 11, FIG. 2, FIG. 3 to support the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, this strong connection is suitable for attachment of additional devices such as stanchion extensions with additional guard rails, proprietary or others, and may be fastened by means of nailing, screwing, welding, strapping, gluing, bolting, or any known equivalent.

The fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, attaches only to the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, therefore does not interfere with the exterior finishes such as siding, lath, stucco, paint, trim, or other exterior claddings. The fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6, truss overhang attachment bracket 2 envelopes the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 overhang such that the entire girth of the rafter, roof truss, or roof member 11 overhang supports the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, and because of the strong connection, the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, becomes suitable for additional devices such as bracket arm extensions 21 with additional nets, rope, cables, straps or any known equivalents. Additional ropes, cables, straps, harnesses or any known equivalent may be attached tied, strapped, clamped or any known equivalent to the fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, or harness ropes may be placed over the crown of the roof to a stanchion on the opposing side for support of the workers on the roof.

The fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, can be used to support any number of other devices such as Jacob's ladders, swings, swinging scaffolds, safety harnesses (for workman and materials) ropes, pulleys, beams, and cables upon which to hang lights, drapes or any known equivalent.

The fall protection device stanchion 1, FIG. 1, FIG. 5, FIG. 6 are double-sided and can be used on either side of any given roof truss, rafter, or roof member 11. Furthermore, the device is economical, has little or no moving parts, is sturdy, requires nominal if any maintenance, and provides value far beyond the cost to build install and maintain. Lastly, the device easily and safely removed and is fully reusable.

The foregoing description of the illustrated embodiment of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description, and is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. The description was selected to best explain the principles of the invention and the practical application of those principles to enable others skilled in the art to best utilize the invention in various embodiments and various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention not be limited by the specification, but be defined by the claims set forth below.