Title:
Rifle and method for manufacturing same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A rifle including the firing mechanism of a revolver from which the revolver's original barrel and handgrips were removed. A replacement barrel, having a length greater than that of the original barrel, is affixed to the front of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the original barrel. A replacement stock for engaging a shoulder of a user is affixed to the rear of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the handgrips. A forearm is affixed to the bottom of the replacement barrel for steadying the rifle while aiming and firing. A method for converting the revolver into the rifle is also provided herein.



Inventors:
Baker, Allen (Buna, TX, US)
Robins, George (Beaumont, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/172942
Publication Date:
01/11/2007
Filing Date:
07/05/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
42/72, 42/74, 42/77
International Classes:
F41C23/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LEE, BENJAMIN P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Stephen R. Greiner, Esquire (Bethesda, MD, US)
Claims:
1. A rifle, comprising: a firing mechanism of a revolver from which its original barrel and handgrips were removed; a replacement barrel, having a length greater than that of the original barrel, being affixed to the front of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the original barrel; a replacement stock for engaging a shoulder of a user being affixed to the rear of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the handgrips, said stock including: a pistol grip portion being secured to the firing mechanism; and, a butt portion extending rearwardly from the pistol grip portion, the butt portion having: a heel for engagement with the top of a shooter's shoulder; a toe located beneath the heel for engagement with the bottom of a shooter's shoulder; and, a comb located forwardly of the heel upon which the cheek of a shooter can be rested during sighting; a forearm being rigidly affixed to the bottom of the replacement barrel for steadying the rifle while aiming and firing; and, a pair of spaced-apart rings encircling the replacement barrel and the forearm for rigidly affixing the forearm to the replacement barrel.

2. The rifle according to claim 1 wherein the firing mechanism includes a rotating cylinder for holding a plurality of bullet-carrying cartridges.

3. The rifle according to claim 1 wherein the replacement barrel has a length greater than about 18.5 inches and lesser than about 32 inches.

4. 4-5. (canceled)

6. A method for converting a revolver, having an original barrel and a pair of handgrips secured to a firing mechanism, into a rifle, the method comprising the steps of: removing the original barrel from the firing mechanism; removing the pair of handgrips from the firing mechanism; providing a replacement barrel adapted for attachment to the firing mechanism and having a length longer than that of the original barrel; affixing the replacement barrel to the firing mechanism; providing a replacement stock adapted for attachment to the firing mechanism and having a pistol grip portion and a butt portion extending rearwardly therefrom; affixing the replacement stock to the firing mechanism; providing a forearm adapted for attachment to the replacement barrel; providing a pair of rings adapted to encircle the forearm and the replacement barrel; and, rigidly affixing the forearm to the bottom of the replacement barrel by encircling the forearm and the replacement barrel with tight fitting rings.

7. The method according to claim 6 wherein the step of affixing the replacement barrel to the firing mechanism is accomplished by screwing the replacement barrel into the firing mechanism and the method comprises the further steps of: drilling a hole in the firing mechanism that intersects the replacement barrel at a right angle; tapping the hole such that the hole is provided with helical threads; providing a locking screw adapted for threaded engagement with the helical threads of the hole; screwing the locking screw into the hole such that it abuts the replacement barrel with sufficient tightness to prevent the withdrawal of the replacement barrel from the firing mechanism; and, welding the locking screw within the hole.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to firearms.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Firearms dealers are often asked, “What type of rifle should I get?” To answer, the dealer must know the type of firearm action favored by the questioner—single shot, lever action, bolt action, slide action or semi-automatic action. A single shot rifle is often a muzzleloader that requires careful aim since the shooter gets only one chance. Lever action rifles, however, are compact, light for the power they pack, and make excellent saddle guns. Bolt action rifles have few working parts and need not be moved from a shooting position to be cocked. Slide action rifles require the movement of the rifle forearm backward and forward for cocking in a manner that offers relatively fast shots. Semi-automatic actions involve reloading of the firing chamber without human intervention for the fastest shooting. These actions all have drawbacks and may not be acceptable to an individual experienced in handling revolvers.

Revolvers are firearms intended to be fired normally with one hand, and in which cartridges are placed within individual chambers in a cylinder. The cylinder is mounted behind a barrel and can be rotated to bring the cartridge chambers successively into alignment with the barrel at its front end and the firing pin at its rear end. When fired, a bullet leaves a cartridge and jumps a gap from a chamber in the cylinder to the barrel.

Modern revolvers offer a shooter many advantageous features. First, these firearms have a durable frame to which the barrel is fastened and into which the rotating cylinder is fitted. The mounting for the cylinder often permits such to be swung out of the frame by releasing a latch for speedy unloading and reloading. Also, today's revolvers have exposed hammers that provide a selective double action to a shooter; that is to say, the hammer can be cocked by the thumb so that the only function of the trigger, when pulled, is the single one of releasing the hammer to fire a cartridge, or the hammer can be cocked and dropped by a continuous pull on the trigger to perform the double action of cocking and releasing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In light of the problems associated with the known firearms, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a firearm that offers to the shooter the accuracy of a rifle and the dependability, reloading ease, and selective double action of a revolver. Such a firearm would be of benefit to sportsmen, hunters, and law enforcement personnel.

It is another object of the invention to provide a method for converting a conventional revolver into a long-barreled rifle. The method is relatively easy and quick to employ, requiring minimal instruction and conventional tools to complete. The rifle constructed with the method has a rotating cylinder and a selective double action.

It is an object of the invention to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof in a rifle for the purposes described that is lightweight in construction, inexpensive to manufacture, and dependable in use.

Briefly, the rifle in accordance with this invention achieves the intended objects by featuring a firing mechanism of a revolver from which its original barrel and handgrips were removed. A replacement barrel, having a length greater than that of the original barrel, is affixed to the front of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the original barrel. A replacement stock for engaging a shoulder of a user and having a pistol grip portion and a butt portion is affixed to the rear of the firing mechanism as a substitute for the handgrips. A forearm is affixed to the bottom of the replacement barrel for steadying the rifle while aiming and firing.

The rifle in accordance with this invention is made by modifying a revolver having an original barrel and a pair of handgrips secured to a firing mechanism. To modify the revolver, the original barrel is first removed from the firing mechanism. Then, the handgrips are removed from the firing mechanism. Next, a replacement barrel, having a length longer than that of the original barrel, is affixed to the firing mechanism. Afterward, a replacement stock, having a pistol grip portion and a butt portion extending rearwardly therefrom, is affixed to the firing mechanism. Finally, a forearm is affixed to the bottom of the replacement barrel.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention may be more readily described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rifle constructed in accordance with the method of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a side view of a pistol having its barrel and handgrips removed to yield the firing mechanism used in constructing the rifle of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view showing details of the connection of the barrel and firing mechanism of the rifle of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the interconnected barrel and firing mechanism of the rifle of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is an exploded, side view of the rifle of FIG. 1.

Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the accompanying drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the FIGS., a rifle in accordance with the present invention is shown at 10. Rifle 10 includes the firing mechanism 12 of a revolver 14 from which its original barrel 16 and handgrips 18 have been removed. A replacement barrel 20 of substantial length is affixed to the front of firing mechanism 12 as a substitute for original barrel 16. Also, a replacement stock 22 for engaging a shoulder of a user is affixed to the rear of firing mechanism 12 as a substitute for handgrips 18. A forearm 24 is affixed to the bottom of replacement barrel 20 so that a user can steady rifle 10 while aiming and firing.

Firing mechanism 12 includes a frame 26 having a barrel mount 28 at its front and a handgrip support 30 at its rear. Provided between barrel mount 28 and handgrip support 30 is an opening 32 within which a rotating cylinder 34 is positioned. Adjacent cylinder 34, frame 26 carries a lock 36 of conventional construction, and whose description will not be belabored here, that drives a firing pin (not shown) into the rear of a cartridge (not shown) when trigger 38 is squeezed.

Barrel mount 28 is a rigid block having a threaded bore 40 that extends through it. A threaded hole 42 penetrates the top of barrel mount 28 and extends downwardly into the middle of bore 40. A locking screw 44 is threadably positioned within hole 42.

Handgrip support 30 comprises a metal plate that extends downwardly from the rear of frame 26. Support 30 is configured to be easily grasped in a hand of the shooter. A pair of bores 46 penetrates support 30 for the passage of a pair of threaded fasteners 48 securing replacement stock 22 to firing mechanism 12.

Rotating cylinder 34 has a plurality of chambers (not shown) positioned about the central axis of rotating cylinder 34 for receiving an equal number of bullet-carrying cartridges. By rotating cylinder 34, the chambers, and hence cartridges, can be successively axially aligned with bore 40 at its front and the firing pin of lock 36 at its rear. The mounting for cylinder 34 may permit cylinder 34 to swing out of opening 32 in frame 26 for speedy unloading and reloading of cartridges.

Lock 36 has an exposed hammer 50 that provides a selective double action permitting hammer 50 to be cocked by the thumb so that the only function of trigger 38, when pulled, is the single one of releasing hammer 50 to drive a firing pin into a cartridge discharging same. Hammer 50 can also be cocked and dropped by a continuous pull on trigger 38 in a double action.

A trigger guard 52 protects trigger 38 from accidental blows that might cause lock 36 to discharge a cartridge. The rear of trigger guard 52 is connected to the top of handgrip support 30. The front of trigger guard 52 is connected to the bottom of frame 26.

Original barrel 16 has a length of about 12 inches (30 cm) and has an internal diameter sufficient to accommodate a bullet fired from a cartridge of, say, 44 caliber. One end of barrel 16 is externally threaded at 54 so that it can be screwed into bore 40 of barrel mount 28. The other end of barrel 16 is provided with a sight 56 that, together with sight 58 mounted atop frame 26 above handgrip support 30, can be used for aiming revolver 14. Of course, the length of barrel 16 and the caliber of the bullets that such can accommodate are a matter of design choice.

Handgrips 18 are affixed to the opposite sides of handgrip support 30 and are configured as mirror images of one another. Each of handgrips 18 is a crescent-shaped pad formed of wood or plastic and having a pair of holes 60 for axial alignment with bores 46 in support 30. Handgrips 18 are contoured so as to be easily grasped in the hand of a shooter and are knurled so that the grasp is not easily lost. Threaded fasteners 62 passing through holes 60 and bores 46 secure the handgrips 18 upon support 30.

Replacement barrel 20 has a length ranging from about 18.5″ (47 cm) to about 32″ (81 cm) and has an internal diameter and rifling sufficient to accommodate a bullet fired from a cartridge carried by cylinder 34. One end of barrel 20 is externally threaded at 64 for screwing into bore 40 of barrel mount 28. After being screwed into bore 40, barrel 20 is snugged into place by tightening locking screw 44 so as to drive such into threads 64 and prevent further rotation of barrel 20.

A weld 66, positioned atop locking screw 44, prevents further rotation of locking screw 44 and locks barrel 20 to firing mechanism 12. Weld 66 is made flush by suitable machining and blued to hide it. Thus, the shooter can neither remove barrel 20 nor easily detect the manner in which it could be removed.

Replacement barrel 20 carries a conventional sight 68 at the end thereof opposite externally threaded end 64. Since sight 68 is widely spaced from sight 58, very accurate sighting of rifle 10 can be made. Sighting is certainly more accurate than that obtainable during ordinary use of revolver 14.

Replacement stock 22 is formed as a unitary whole from wood, metal, plastic, or other suitable material. Stock 22 includes a pistol grip portion 70 for connection to handgrip support 30 and a butt portion 72 projecting rearwardly from pistol grip portion 70. Pistol grip portion 70 has a vertical slot 74 for receiving support 30 and a pair of transverse apertures 76 that penetrate slot 74 at locations where they can be axially aligned with bores 46 in support 30. The tightening of threaded fasteners 48, passing through bores 46 and apertures 76, secures stock 22 to firing mechanism 12.

Replacement stock 22 is configured for comfort and shooting ease. Pistol grip portion 70 is dimensioned for easy grasping by a shooting hand and to ensure that the index/trigger finger of the shooting hand easily contacts the bottom of trigger 38 for a steady pull. The rear of butt portion 72 has a heel 78 for engagement with the top of the shooter's shoulder and a toe 80 for engagement with the bottom of the shooter's shoulder. The top of butt portion 72 defines a comb 82 upon which the cheek of a shooter can be lightly rested during sighting.

Forearm 24 permits a user to comfortably support the front of rifle 10. Forearm 24 comprises an elongated block 84 of wood, plastic or other suitable material having a length that is somewhat less than that of barrel 20. Block 84 has a groove 86 in its top for snugly receiving the bottom of barrel 20.

Two metal bands 88 and 90 fasten forearm 24 to barrel 20. Bands 88 and 90 are respectively positioned at the front and rear of forearm 24 and encircle both forearm 24 and barrel 20. One of a pair of threaded fasteners 92 penetrates each band 88 and 90 and forearm 24 so as to tighten bands 88 and 90 and lock forearm 24 in place.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that rifle 10 can be readily assembled. First, original barrel 16 is unscrewed from barrel mount 28 of revolver 14 and handgrips 18 are removed from support 30 of revolver 14. Then, threaded hole 42 is formed in barrel mount 28 by suitable drilling and tapping. Now, making sure that threads 64 of replacement barrel 20 match those of bore 40, perhaps by machining such for an exact fit, replacement barrel 20 is screwed into bore 40. Afterward, locking screw 44 is positioned in hole 42 and is screwed into tight engagement with threads 64 thereby locking barrel 20 and firing mechanism 12 together. Next, weld 66 is applied within hole 42 atop locking screw 44 and is ground flush with the top of barrel mount 28. Later, a light coat of bluing is applied to the top of barrel mount 28 to make the boundaries of weld 66 invisible. Then, replacement stock 22 is affixed to support 30 by means of threaded fasteners 48. Finally, forearm 24 is positioned against the bottom of barrel 20 and is locked in place by encircling it and barrel 20 with bands 88 and 90 and, subsequently, driving threaded fasteners 92 through bands 88 and 90 into forearm 24. Revolver 14 is converted into rifle 10 in an hour or two.

It will be appreciated that virtually all of the functional features of rifle 10 can be configured to the specifications of a user; thus, a customized firearm can be obtained. The length of barrel 20 and stock 22, for example, can be increased or decreased to suit a shooter of larger- or smaller-than average stature. Regardless, rifle 10 offers the great shooting accuracy of a long-barreled firearm plus the dependability, reloading ease, and selective double action of a short-barreled revolver. Such a firearm is of benefit to many and can be produced easily at minimal cost.

While the rifle 10 and its method of construction have been described with a high degree of particularity, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that modifications may be made thereto. Therefore, it is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the firearm and method described above, but encompasses any and all firearms and methods within the scope of the following claims.