Title:
Fashion design doll and method for making the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A kit including a doll with means provided on its backside for attaching an outfit designed to be shown on the front side of the doll; at least one flat pattern including at least one free end; at least one fabric designed to be cut in the form of the flat pattern to create the outfit; and complimentary means for attaching provided on the free end of the fabric when the fabric is transformed into the outfit such that the outfit attaches to the doll.



Inventors:
Jenkins, Judy Jenevia (Columbia, MD, US)
Application Number:
11/149135
Publication Date:
12/14/2006
Filing Date:
06/10/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63H3/52
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HYLINSKI, ALYSSA MARIE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ms. Judy Jenkins (Columbia, MD, US)
Claims:
1. A kit comprising: a doll with means provided on its backside for attaching an outfit designed to be shown on the front side of the doll; at least one flat pattern including at least one free end; at least one fabric designed to be cut in the form of the flat pattern to create the outfit; and complimentary means for attaching provided on the free end of the fabric when the fabric is transformed into the outfit such that the outfit attaches to the doll.

2. The kit of claim 1, wherein the means for attaching is magnetic strip and the complimentary means for attaching is at least one magnetic strip.

3. The kit of claim 1, wherein the means for attaching is at least one velcro strip and the complimentary means for attaching is at least one velcro strip.

4. The kit of claim 1, wherein the outfit is a sample for illustrating how to make future outfits.

5. The kit of claim 1, wherein the at least one flat pattern is selected from the group consisting of a pre-designed pant, top, or dress.

6. The kit of claim 1, further comprising at least one accessory.

7. The kit of claim 1, further comprising at least one marking pencil with a brush eraser, and at least one adhesive such as glue.

8. A method for fashioning a doll, comprising the steps of: selecting a flat pattern; cutting out the pattern; selecting a fabric; using the marking pencil to trace the selected pattern on the fabric; cutting the fabric from around the traced pattern to create an outfit with at least one free end; placing magnetic strips on the at least one free end of the outfit; and situating the outfit on front side of a doll such that the at least one free end attaches to the back side of the doll.

9. The method of claim 8, further comprising the step of: accessorizing the fabric.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention is related to dolls and in particular a method for making a doll suitable for reconfigurable fashion design.

2. Description of the Related Art

Paper dolls appeared in Western society in the late 18th century, when French dressmakers' life-sized dolls were replaced with the “English fashion doll.” These eight-inch tall figures were printed on cardboard (invented by the Chinese about 200 years earlier), and jointed with threads. They came with underclothing as well as several changes of dresses and coiffures. At about three shillings (about $15 in today's American dollars) for a complete doll and wardrobe—plus an envelope to store her in—dressmakers could afford to own several sets, and distribute these dolls among their favorite customers. See the history of paper dolls at www.aisling.net/dolls/historypaper1.htm.

In the 20th century, other magazines followed this trend, including Ladies' Home Journal (Sheila Young's “Lettie Lane”), Pictorial Review (Grace Drayton's “Dolly Dingle”), Good Housekeeping (Sheila Young's “Polly Pratt”), and the famous “Kewpie Dolls” by Rose O'Neill in Woman's Home Companion. The most popular paper doll of the mid-20th century was probably Betsy McCall, created by Kay Morrissey. However, children also enjoyed paper dolls in many magazines of that era, including Jack and Jill Magazine, and Children's Playmate. Since 1962, Barbie paper dolls have become the most popular among American children.

Doll magazines, a modem phenomenon, have grown with the popularity of doll collecting and dolimaking. Virtually all of the doll and teddy bear periodicals printed in the United States today regularly print paper dolls. See http://www.opdag.com/History.html.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one embodiment, the current invention is made out of cork, felt and magnets in lieu of paper. The doll kit includes tools for designing creations for the doll.

According to one embodiment of the invention, the dolls magnetic backing keeps its clothes in place and enables the doll to be placed on a magnetic surface.

The doll is configured to be placed in a purse, backpack or the like.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

A more complete appreciation of the invention and many of the attendant advantages thereof will be readily obtained as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a flow chart illustrating the steps for creating a reconfigurable fashion design and attaching the same to a doll;

FIG. 2A is storyboard for the packaging;

FIG. 2B is storyboard for the doll; and

FIG. 2C is storyboard for the flat pattern.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals designate identical or corresponding parts throughout the several views. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the doll is provided in a kit. The doll can be made of cork or alternatively card board, fabric or the like. According to one embodiment, the backside of the doll is magnetic to enable outfits designed for the doll to be attached to the doll. Further, the magnetic strips enable the doll to be placed on a magnetic surface like a refrigerator. See FIGS. 2B and 2C

Alternatively, the doll has velcro or another known mechanism which can be used to removeably attach designed outfits. The doll generally has the following dimensions 22×5 1/2 ×⅛ inches. Hence, according to one embodiment of the invention, the doll can be placed in a purse, backpack, or the like.

The kit includes at least one pre-made outfit as a sample for making future outfits. The kit also includes a plurality of felted fabrics and a plurality of flat patterns. The flat patterns could be, by way of non-limiting example, a pre-designed pant, top, or dress etc. The kit further includes a plurality of feathers or the like; at least one set of pom-poms or alterative accessories; cha-cha yarn or the like; straps made from leather or similar material; and vinyl fabric or similar material. The kit also includes at least one marking pencil with a brush eraser, at least one adhesive such as glue, and a plurality of magnetic strips.

FIG. 1 is a flow chart illustrating the steps for creating a fashion design and attaching the same to the doll. In step 101, the fashion designer selects one of the pre-made flat patterns and cuts out the pattern. In step 103, the fashion designer selects a felt fabric and using the marking pencil, traces the selected pattern on the fabric. The pattern includes at least one free end designed to wrap around to the backside of the doll.

Straight pins may be needed to keep the fabric in place. In step 105, the fabric is cut from around the traced pattern and excess pencil marks are removed using the brush eraser so that the marks do not interfere with the design. In step 107, the fashion designer is free to accessorize the felted fabric with either accessories included in the kit such as feathers or leather or other accessories available to the fashion designer.

The fashion designer should use the magnetic strips provided in the kit to stick on tabs on the at least one free end to hold the newly designed clothes in place on the doll. See step 109 and FIG. 2A. Lastly, in step 109, the tabs should be folded down to adhere to at least one magnetic strip on back of the doll.

FIG. 2A is a storyboard of the packaging. In a preferred embodiment, a burlap bag is provided with two burlap straps. The burlap bag is divided into three sections. The first section has the doll. The center section has the flat patterns with all of the accessories. The last section includes all of the felts. A hang tag is provided with a biography of the doll. Each doll can have a unique biography. The burlap bag has silver gromets used to hold the straps.

FIG. 2B is the storyboard of the actual doll. The front and back of the doll is illustrated. As can be seen from FIG. 2B, the hair of the doll is preferably made of felt, the lips are made of felt, and the front of the body of the doll is made of cork. The backside of the doll is magnetic.

FIG. 2C is the storyboard of the flat pattern, illustrating the steps of FIG. 1. In particular, FIG. 2C illustrates the tab (i.e., free end) configuration necessary to attach the outfits to the doll.

Obviously, numerous modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. It is therefore to be understood tat within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described herein.