Title:
Carwash trench drain
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A carwash trench drain. In one embodiment, a method is provided for installing a carwash trench drain. The method includes the steps of: providing precast wash-trench sections, digging and grading a trench, and setting the precast wash-trench sections in series joined end to end in the trench to provide the carwash trench drain. In another embodiment, a section of carwash trench drain includes a precast section of generally U-shaped rectangular cross section. The precast wash-trench section includes a horizontal floor and opposite first and second sidewalls. The first and second opposite sidewalls respectively define first and second top edges. At least one wash-form is fitted to the top edge of at least one of the opposite sidewalls.



Inventors:
Hankinson, Beau A. (Newark, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/392884
Publication Date:
12/14/2006
Filing Date:
03/30/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
404/2
International Classes:
E01C11/22
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LAGMAN, FREDERICK LYNDON
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
IP Law Leaders PLLC (PLG) (Washington, DC, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method of installing a carwash trench drain, said method comprising the steps of: providing precast wash-trench sections; digging and grading a trench; and setting the precast wash-trench sections in series joined end to end in the trench to provide the carwash trench drain.

2. A section of carwash trench drain, comprising: a precast section of generally U-shaped rectangular cross section, said precast section having a floor and opposite first and second sidewalls, wherein said first and second sidewalls respectively define first and second top edges; at least one wash-form fitted to at least one of said first and second top edges; and at least one weldment fitted to said floor.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/666,306, filed Mar. 30, 2005, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to trench drains used in commercial carwash systems. More specifically, the invention is a carwash trench drain made up of precast wash-trench sections.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In modern day western civilization, there is a great demand for carwash facilities. Constructing a new commercial tunnel carwash involves building a carwash trench drain. Constructing a trench drain is expensive and time consuming. Prior art methods involve building or handling forms for concrete pouring on site which requires considerable time, effort, and the employment of a number of trades, and is subject to weather conditions. Thus, there is a need for a faster less weather dependent way of constructing carwash trench drains.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A carwash trench drain. In one embodiment, a method is provided for installing a carwash trench drain. The method includes the steps of: providing precast wash-trench sections, digging and grading a trench, and setting the precast wash-trench sections in series joined end to end in the trench to provide the carwash trench drain. In another embodiment, a section of carwash trench drain includes a precast section of generally U-shaped rectangular cross section. The precast wash-trench section includes a horizontal floor and opposite first and second sidewalls. The first and second opposite sidewalls respectively define first and second top edges. At least one wash-form is fitted to the top edge of at least one of the opposite sidewalls.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a cross-section annotated view of a carwash trench-drain 140 comprising a plurality of precast wash-trench sections 100.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a carwash trench-drain 140 according to the invention.

FIG. 3 shows the elevation of the carwash trench-drain 140.

FIGS. A1 through A25 show how a carwash trench-drain 140 of the present invention was installed at a customer's site using a plurality of precast wash-trench sections 100.

Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention relates generally to trench drains used in commercial carwash systems. More specifically, the invention is a carwash trench drain 140 made up of precast wash-trench sections 100.

The terms “pre-formed”, “precast”, “preformed”, and “precast” are regarded herein as equivalent terms. The terms “conveyor trench”, “wash-trench”, “carwash trench-drain” and “carwash trench” are regarded herein as equivalent terms.

The trench drain of the present invention replaces traditional poured-in-place concrete carwash trench drains. In one aspect of the present invention, the precast trench drain is designed with conveyor weldments, electrical and plumbing connections. In the working example below, installing the trench drain of the present invention is simple and much faster than hitherto possible using poured in place concrete methodologies of the prior art. The trench drain of the present invention is designed to accept a wide range of carwash conveyor kit from a variety of carwash equipment manufacturers.

FIG. 1 is a cross-section annotated view of a carwash trench-drain 140 comprising a plurality of precast wash-trench sections 100. The precast wash-trench section 100 is of generally U-shaped rectangular cross section. The precast wash-trench section 100 includes a floor 105 and opposite first 107 and second 109 sidewalls. The opposite sidewalls 107 and 109 respectively define first and second top edges 111 and 113. At least one wash-form 420 is fitted to the top edge of at least one of the opposite sidewalls 107 and/or 109. The floor 105 includes at least one generally elongated weldment 115.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a carwash trench-drain 140 according to the invention.

FIG. 3 shows the elevation of the carwash trench-drain 140. The carwash trench-drain 140 as shown in FIG. 1 is made up of a plurality of precast wash-trench sections 100 (represented by the alphanumeric labels “100a” through to “100j”). The precast wash-trench sections 100 are joined in series. It should be understood that the actual number of precast wash-trench sections 100 used to install a particular carwash trench-drain 140 can vary without detracting from the spirit of the invention.

WORKING EXAMPLE

FIGS. A1 through A25 show how a carwash trench-drain 140 of the present invention was installed at a customer's site using a plurality of precast wash-trench sections 100. Eighty feet of a carwash trench-drain 140 was installed in far less time than it would take using prior art pour-in place methods. More specifically, the carwash trench-drain 140 and wash-form 420 can be installed in 1 or 2 days and be ready for concrete pouring of the bay-area floor 410. Conventional methods can take up to 2 weeks to install a conventional carwash trench-drain depending on weather conditions.

With respect to FIGS. A1-A3, pre-formed wash-trench sections 100 arrive by truck (FIG. A1) on a construction site 120 and unloaded from a truck-bed 160 ready for installation in a selected bay-area 180. In FIG. A2, the bay-area 180 is shown cleared of obstructions and ready for trench digging and installation of pre-formed wash-trench sections 100. In FIG. A3, the bay-area 180 is measured out and checked over prior to placement of the wash-trench sections 100.

Referring to FIG. A4, based on customer specifications for the carwash trench-drain 140, the bay-area 180 is marked using a fluorescent marker (not shown) to provide a longitudinal guideline 200 for guiding a trench-digger machine 220. In FIG. A4, the trench-digger machine 220 is shown digging a trench 240 adjacent to guideline 200. The depth of the trench 240 is selected to ensure that the depth is sufficient to accommodate the pre-formed wash-trench sections 100 shown in FIG. A1. To ensure proper trench depth is achieved, any suitable system can be used. In FIG. A5, a laser transit 260 is used to assure that the trench 240 is dug to the appropriate depth.

Each part of the freshly dug trench 240 is graded as shown in FIG. A7 to provide a graded trench floor 280. It is important to grade the trench to ensure proper wastewater flow (see FIG. 3). As each part of the trench 240 is graded, a pre-formed wash-trench section 100 is placed in the trench (see FIG. A6).

As each section 100 is placed on the graded trench floor 280 of trench 240, care is taken to ensure that sections 100 are properly joined together end-on-end. Adhesive 300 can be applied as shown in FIG. A8 and the next pre-formed wash-trench section 100 lowered in place as shown in FIG. A9. Connection fasteners 320 are used (see FIG. A10) to connect adjacent sections 100 (represented by alphanumeric labels “100a” and “100b” in FIG. A10). Other sections 100 are installed in the same way (FIG. A11). Sections 100 are then welded together (FIG. A12); more specifically, weldment(s) 115 of one section 100 are welded to weldment(s) of the next section 100. Seams 340 between adjoining sections 100 are joined together are sealed with any suitable sealant such as concrete sealant 360 (FIG. A13). Utility lines 370 (such as plumbing and/or electrical lines) can be chased to inserts 380 installed in the sections 100 in accordance with the customer's specifications (see FIGS. A14 and A20).

Once sections 100 are in place, backfill 400 is applied around the boundary of each section 100 (see FIG. A15) of wash-trench 120. The backfill 400 can be applied at any suitable time (see FIG. A16).

Referring to FIGS. A17 through A21, at least one wash-form 420 is added to the sides of the wash-trench 120. The least one wash-form 420 allows the concrete contractor to set the grade of the bay-area floor 410 thereby giving the concrete contractor a guide to act as a reference during the concrete pour operation. One or more slots 440 in the at least one wash-form 420 enable construction workers 450 to use any suitable kind of connector 460 to position and hold the at least one wash-form 420 in place. The sections 100 (and hence completed carwash trench-drain 140) include opposite facing sidewalls 500 and 520. The at least one wash-form 420 is fitted to top of at least one of the sidewalls 500 and 520 (see, e.g., FIG. A21). Each wash-form 420 enables the bay-floor 410 to be poured with concrete thus saving additional time.

Referring to FIGS. A22 and A23, the wash-form 420 provides the contractor with an accurate alignment point for setting a correlator 540, which when installed is used to align a vehicle at the entrance of the conveyor part of a car-wash. FIGS. A24 and A25, which show completion of the concrete pour of the bay-area floor 410.

A carwash trench-drain. In one embodiment a method is provided for installing a carwash trench-drain 140. The method comprises the steps of: providing precast wash-trench sections, digging and grading a trench, and setting the precast wash-trench sections in series joined end to end in the trench to provide the carwash trench. In another embodiment, a section of carwash trench drain comprises a precast section 100 of generally U-shaped rectangular cross section. The precast wash-trench section 100 includes a horizontal floor 105 and opposite first 107 and second 109 sidewalls. The opposite sidewalls 107 and 109 respectively define top edges 111 and 113. At least one wash-form 420 is fitted to the top edge of at least one of the opposite sidewalls 107 and/or 109.

It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the spirit of the present invention.