Title:
Board game relating to dating experiences
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game having a set of question cards. Players draw cards and answer questions based on personal dating experiences they have had to gain points. Upon answering a question, a player gains the number of points specified on the question card and marks the points accordingly on a score-keeping tablet. The game is over when a player accumulates a specified winning number of points. The winner of the game is the person who has had the most substandard dating and relationship experiences.



Inventors:
Silfies, Janice M. (Allentown, PA, US)
Application Number:
11/144170
Publication Date:
12/07/2006
Filing Date:
06/03/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F1/00
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Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Cheryl R. Figlin (Allentown, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. Game playing apparatus comprising: a. A first set of questions cards each having imprinted a question describing a unique dating or relationship situation that a person would find unfavorable in a potential mate, wherein players answer questions by telling true stories of their personal experience relating to the question presented on the card; and b. A second set of cards each imprinted with the word “steal” which players use to answer questions out of turn to gain additional points, thus players with more experiences excel in the game.

2. The apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said question cards include an imprinted point value based on the undesirable aspect of the said question.

3. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the apparatus includes a scorekeeping tablet to keep track of the number of points a player gets.

4. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the point values range from one to six; with six being the most unfavorable experience with a former mate.

5. A method of playing a game by a plurality of players comprising of: a. Providing each player with a set number of steal cards and a score-keeping tablet; b. Selecting a player to draw a first question card; c. Said player reads the card aloud and if question relates to a personal experience of the player, the player answers the question with a short story or description of his or her experience; d. Upon answering a question, the player gains a number of points specified on the question card and marks the number of points on the score card; e. If said player cannot answer the question drawn, then any opposing player with a steal card may steal the unanswered question by turning in a steal card and telling his or her story relating to the question and gaining the points specified on the question card; f. Repeating steps (c) through (e) for each player in turn until a player reaches the specified number of winning points.

6. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the imprinted point value are the number of moves on a game board having a start and finish with spaces in between and using a pawn to represent each player.

7. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the cards and steal cards are represented in an electronic device.

8. The apparatus according to claim 1, wherein questions provide opportunities for players to talk about past dating frustrations and misfortunes in a humorous manner and vent about past or present mates.

9. The apparatus according to claim 1, wherein some questions are morally controversial, creating opportunities for players to discuss standards of dating and helping players talk about what is acceptable dating behavior and what is not.

10. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein the winning player is the person with the most unfavorable dating experience.

11. The apparatus according to claim 2, wherein some of the question cards have a second question on the same card and a second imprinted point value for answering that question.

12. The method according to claim 5, wherein questions provide opportunities for players to talk about past dating frustrations and misfortunes in a humorous manner and vent about past or present mates.

13. The method according to claim 5, wherein some questions are morally controversial, creating opportunities for players to discuss standards of dating and helping players talk about what is acceptable dating behavior and what is not.

14. The method according to claim 5, wherein the winning player is the person with the most unfavorable dating experience.

15. The method according to claim 5, wherein some question cards have an optional second question with an imprinted point value for answering the second question.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to a card and board games. More particularly, this invention relates to games for adult players involving answering personal questions about dating, relationships and sexual experiences.

2. Description of the Prior Art

There are various games in the prior art involving questions about relationships and sex. Many of these games have included hypothetical situations with responses by players involving sharing personal feelings in relation to the hypothetical situations presented. None of the games found in the prior art have been seen to include story-telling of real dating situations experienced by players for the purpose of providing an outlet for players of the same sex to discuss dating misfortunes in a humorous manner, where the winner of the game is the player with the most substandard dating experiences.

Examples of prior art may be represented in U.S. Pat. No. 5,054,775, Banks et al, wherein a game relating to personal relationships includes questions and sets of categories with players responding to questions about relationships. In this game, players answer personal questions about relationships based on the categories provided in the game. The questions presented by Banks, have predetermined answers to which players can answer correctly or incorrectly. Although Banks' game is about relationships, it is significantly different from the present invention in that there are predetermined, right and wrong answers. Banks' invention does not include questions that require players to answer in a story telling format, based on actual relationship and dating experiences.

In U.S. Pat. No. 5,375,846, Smith provides a question and answer game involving questions about sexual etiquette and hypothetical situations. The question cards include situations that present dilemmas to which a player must resolve through role-play, answering each question as if they were a man or woman. Smith's game differs from the present invention in that it asks players to hypothesize about questions of sexual etiquette. It does not require players to answer these questions based on actual experiences they have had pertaining to relationships and sex.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,681,046, Lawrence describes a compatibility game with a series of personal questions which players answer by assigning numeric values to. The purpose of Lawrence's game is to find likenesses among players of the opposite sex and to match players with potential partners. The method and purpose of Lawrence's invention is significantly different than the present invention. Although Lawrence's game involves players answering personal questions about relationships and dating, his game does not involve players telling stories about real dating situations they have experienced. Furthermore, his game is not meant to be played with members of the same sex.

There have been games in the prior art providing various methods of play involving topics of relationships, dating and sex. None of the above noted patents, taken singularly or combined include what is being disclosed in this invention. This invention provides a new game relating to personal dating and relationship experiences.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The objective of the present invention is to provide an out-of-the-ordinary game that involves players of the same sex telling stories about dating disasters, bizarre relationships and general dating misfortunes. This invention includes game apparatus and method of play that involves players taking turns selecting question cards, each card depicting a particular situation or trait that members of the same sex would find unfavorable in a mate. Upon answering questions, players tell stories and give details as proof that they have experienced the particular situation depicted in the question. The game provides opportunities for venting frustrations, gossiping and making derogatory statements about former mates. Points are awarded to players for answering questions. The first player to reach the specified winning number of points is the winner. The winner of the game is noted as the person who has had the most substandard dating experiences or dated the most losers.

The question cards presented in the present invention have been written to be light-hearted and humorous. The questions, although negative, are not meant to invoke past dating situations that may cause emotional discomfort to players. The game is meant to allow for players to laugh about the idiosyncrasies in their past relationships. Therefore, the present invention provides an entertaining, humorous and therapeutic game about dating and relationships, to be played with players of the same sex, for the purpose of talking about past dating experiences. The objectives and method of this game have not been accomplished in any games found in the prior art.

An important objective of this invention is to expose the morals of players and provide outlets for discussion upon what is acceptable behavior and what is not. The game's questions can be controversial. What one player may find to be an undesirable trait or behavior, another players may think of as normal and acceptable. This game presents morally diverse questions and opportunities for players to gain insight from other players.

An advantage of the present invention is its' simplicity. There is no technical skill or intelligence required to play and no complex game pieces. This invention provides a useful and novel game that is easily conveyed, understood and played. There is no right or wrong answers. The only qualification needed to play is the presence of some substandard dating experiences and the ability to gossip and tell stories. These features, combined, provide an advantage to the game's marketability as well as manufacturing costs.

Although the preferred embodiment of this invention is described with a score-keeping tablet, the game can also be played as a board game or card game. This invention can also be adapted to be played as a computer game or television game show.

Need 1st claim re-written here.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of the description, there is shown:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the game apparatus of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows the back surface of the question cards.

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of the invention as a board game

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the present invention. The game apparatus of the present invention comprises of a first set of cards 1, hereinafter referred to as question cards. The set of question cards, preferably at least two hundred, are of like size and shape. When viewed prospectively, the anterior surface of the question cards are all identified with a word such as the game's title 2, making them indistinguishable from one another. The posterior side of the questions cards 3, hereinafter referred to as the question side, each contain a unique question 4, describing an undesirable dating scenario or trait of a member of the opposite sex. The question side of the cards, also contain a point value 5 which differs from one to six depending upon the distastefulness of the situation presented, six being the most offensive or bizarre behavior of a member of the opposite sex.

Examples of question utilized in the game are as follows:

  • Did you ever date a man who openly flirted with other women? 4 points
  • Have you ever been out with a man who got himself arrested during your date? 6 points
  • Did you ever date a man who claimed that he was abducted by aliens? 6 points
  • Did you ever have a boyfriend who forgot your birthday? 2 points
  • Did you ever find another woman's phone number in your boyfriend's pocket or wallet? 5 points
  • Did you ever date someone who was unknowingly a male escort who wanted to be paid for your date? 4 points
  • Have you ever found an intimate piece of clothing in your boyfriend's car or house that didn't belong to you? 5 points

A limited number of about 25 question cards contain a second part to the questions 6. The first part of the question defines a distasteful situation 7, and the second part presents an even more distasteful version of that same situation 8. Two part questions give players an opportunity to be awarded a higher number of points 9 for extreme experiences.

Examples of two part questions include:

  • Have you ever been called another woman's name in bed? 5 points A man's name? 6 points
  • Have you ever received a fake piece of jewelry as a gift from a boyfriend? 3 points A fake diamond ring? 5 points

Upon answering questions, players are awarded points. Points are tracked on individual score-keeping tablets 10. The objective of the game is to incur the winning number of points.

The game includes a score keeping method comprising of a set of score-keeping tablets 10, each of like size and shape and indistinguishable from one another. At the start of the game, each player is given a score-keeping tablet, which is used throughout the game to mark the number of points received. The preferred number of score-keeping tablets provided in the game would be approximately eight, or enough to accommodate the maximum number of players. The score-keeping tablets are constructed of sturdy cardboard back and imprinted paper. The game also includes a set of pencils 11, for writing on the score-keeping tablets. Each page of the score-keeping tablet is imprinted with a design of the game comprising of a starting point 12 and a destination point 13 and approximately 30 spaces 14 for tallying points received. A space is also provided on a tablet for players to write his or her name 15. The score-keeping tablet contains approximately 25 imprinted pages.

The game also comprises of a second set of cards 16, hereinafter referred to as steal cards. Steal cards are imprinted with the word “steal” 17 on the anterior side and have a blank posterior side. The cards are of like size, shape and color and are indistinguishable from one another. The preferred number of steal cards is approximately twenty-four, or three cards per player for the maximum amount of players. Steal cards are provided to players at the start of the game. They are used throughout the game to answer open questions. An open question is one that the player who originally drew the question, was unable to answer. Therefore, steal cards provide a player with an opportunity to gain additional points, out of turn, allowing players with the most substandard dating experiences to excel in the game.

The game includes a game rules and instructions pamphlet 18 describing the rules and play of the game. The instructions for playing the game are as follows:

    • 1. At the start of the game, provide each player with a score-keeping tablet, a pencil and 3 steal cards.
    • 2. Shuffle the cards and place them face down in a central location.
    • 3. Decide what player will take the first turn.
    • 4. The first player draws a card from the pile of cards and reads it aloud.
    • 5. If the player has experienced the situation depicted in the question drawn, the player must give details or a brief story of their personal experience as it related to that question.
    • 6. Upon answering a question, a player will receive the number of points specified on the question card and mark one space on their score keeping tablet for each point received.
    • 7. If a player cannot provide an answer to the question drawn, they do not receive any points.
    • 8. An unanswered question is an open question that can be stolen by another player.
    • 9. Any or all opposing players may opt to use one of their steal cards to answer an open question.
    • 10. To answer an open question, a player turns in one of their steal cards, answers the open question, and receives the number of points specified on the question cards, marking their score card accordingly.
    • 11. The game continues with players taking consecutive turns selecting cards, answering questions and accumulating points.
    • 12. The first player to reach the specified winning number of points wins the game.

The game can easily be adapted to be played like a traditional board game with a game board and pawns. The apparatus of the invention shown as a board game FIG. 3 includes a game board 19 with a purity of spaces 20 which includes a starting point 21 and a destination point 22. Also included in the board game are pawns 23, preferably 8 in number that are used to identify each player in the game. A stack of question cards 24, preferably two-hundred in number is placed on the question card space on the game board 25. A second set of steal cards 26, preferably twenty-four in number is distributed to players at the beginning of the game. Steal cards allow players to answer a question that remained unanswered by the drawing player. There is an area identified on the board for players to discard their used steal cards 27. Each question card 28 is marked with the number of spaces 29 the player is to advance along the board if they can answer the question presented. Each question card describes a distasteful situation or character of a possible former mate 30. The first player to reach the destination point by answering questions and telling stories about the men they have dated is the winner of the game and noted as the person who has dated the most losers.

Although the drawings of the present invention depict the preferred embodiment of the game, the game apparatus is not meant to limit the game the preferred components. It can also be adapted for use as an electronic game, game show or other similar variations in the game's composition.





 
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