Title:
COLLECTION BOARD GAMES
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Board games include a game board divided into a plurality of regions, the game board having a pathway defined by a plurality of spaces including a set of safe spaces, a set of danger spaces, and a set of token spaces. A plurality of tokens adapted to be drawn when a playing piece lands on a token space is provided. The plurality of tokens includes a set of collection tokens adapted to be collected if drawn when a playing piece lands on a token space. Means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions are provided to instruct forfeiture of a collected collection token if a playing piece is on a danger space in the active region.



Inventors:
Matilla, Kimberly (Venice, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/421411
Publication Date:
12/07/2006
Filing Date:
05/31/2006
Assignee:
MATTEL, INC. (El Segundo, CA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KOLISCH HARTWELL, P.C. (PORTLAND, OR, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A board game, the board game comprising: a game board divided into a plurality of regions, the game board having a pathway defined by a plurality of spaces including: a set of safe spaces; a set of danger spaces; and a set of token spaces; a plurality of playing pieces configured for movement along the pathway in turns; a movement indication device configured for determining movement of the plurality of playing pieces along the pathway; a plurality of tokens adapted to be drawn when a playing piece lands on a token space, the plurality of tokens including a set of collection tokens adapted to be collected if drawn when a playing piece lands on a token space; and means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions, the means configured to instruct forfeiture of a collected collection token if a playing piece is on a danger space in the active region; wherein the active region includes a subset of safe spaces and a subset of danger spaces.

2. The board game of claim 1, wherein the means for determining an active region includes: an active region designation device adapted to designate the active region; and a set of region tokens having instructional indicia for manipulating the active region designation device, the region tokens a subset of the plurality of tokens.

3. The board game of claim 2, wherein: the plurality of regions are generally radially spaced about a center of the game board; the active region designation device is positioned generally in the center of the game board and is adapted to rotate about an axis through a plurality of positions corresponding to the plurality of regions; and the instructional indicia for manipulating the active region designation device includes instructional indicia for rotating the active region designation device a given number of positions.

4. The board game of claim 1, wherein the set of token spaces is a subset of the set of danger spaces.

5. The board game of claim 1, wherein: the plurality of spaces further includes a set of card spaces; and the board game further comprises a plurality of cards adapted to be drawn when a playing piece either lands on a card space or passes a card space.

6. The board game of claim 5, wherein the plurality of cards are further adapted to be drawn when a playing piece passes from a first region to a second region.

7. The board game of claim 5, wherein the means for determining an active region includes a set of collection cards having instructional indicia for collection when drawn.

8. The board game of claim 5, wherein: the means for determining an active region further includes an active region designation device adapted to designate the active region; the set of collection cards includes a plurality of subsets of collections cards, the subsets of collection cards having instructional indicia to manipulate the active region designation device when a predetermined number of cards of a single subset of cards to be collected are collected.

9. The board game of claim 8, wherein: the plurality of regions are generally radially spaced about a center of the game board; the active region designation device is positioned generally in the center of the game board and is adapted to rotate about an axis through a plurality of positions corresponding to the plurality of regions; and the set of collection cards include instructional indicia for rotating the active region designation device a given number of positions.

10. The board game of claim 5, wherein the plurality of cards includes a subset of cards with instructional indicia to permit movement of a playing piece to any token space on the game board.

11. The board game of claim 5, wherein the plurality of cards includes a subset of cards with instructional indicia to permit avoiding forfeiture of a collected token if a playing piece is on a danger space in the active region.

12. The board game of claim 5, wherein the plurality of cards includes a subset of cards with instructional indicia to permit switching pathway locations of two playing pieces.

13. The board game of claim 5, wherein the plurality of cards includes a subset of cards with instructional indicia to permit stealing a collected token.

14. The board game of claim 1, wherein the pathway includes a plurality of interconnecting paths.

15. The board game of claim 1, wherein: the game board includes indicia of structures; the safe spaces are spaces that are simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from simulated lines of sight from a given point on the game board; and the danger spaces are spaces that are not simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from the simulated lines of sight.

16. A board game, the board game comprising: a game board divided into a plurality of regions, the game board including: indicia of a pathway defined by a plurality of spaces including a set of safe spaces and a set of danger spaces; and indicia of structures, wherein: the safe spaces are spaces that are simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from simulated lines of sight from a given point on the game board; and the danger spaces are spaces that are not simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from the simulated lines of sight; a plurality of playing pieces for movement along the pathway in turns; and a movement indication device for determining movement of the plurality of playing pieces along the pathway.

17. A method of playing a board game, comprising: taking turns moving playing pieces around a game board having a plurality of regions and including a pathway of spaces, the pathway including a set of danger spaces; drawing a token if a playing piece lands on a token space; collecting the drawn token if it is a collection token; manipulating an active region designation device to designate an active region of the game board according to instructional indicia on the drawn token if the drawn token is a region token; and forfeiting a collected collection token if a playing piece is on a danger space within the active region.

18. The method of claim 17, wherein the danger spaces are indicated as being simulatedly within lines of sight from a given point on the game board.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein: the pathway further includes a set of safe spaces; and the safe spaces are indicated as being hidden behind simulated structure from lines of sight from the given point on the game board.

20. The method of claim 17, further comprising: drawing and collecting a card if a playing piece lands on a card space; and manipulating the active region designation device to designate an active region of the game board according to instructional indicia on a collected card, if a predetermined number of cards with a given designation have been collected.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is based upon and claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/687,466, entitled “Board Game with Region Selection Device,” filed on Jun. 3, 2005, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure is directed to board games and more particularly to collection board games with game boards having a plurality of regions and means for determining an active region.

Examples of board games with defined regions are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,193,814, 5,709,384, 5,743,531, 6,176,486, 6,336,634, 6,398,222, 6,478,300, 6,581,934, and 6,834,856, and U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/065998, the disclosure of which are incorporated herein by reference for all purposes. Another example of a board game is entitled INSEL DER SCHMUGGLER or SMUGGLER'S ISLAND and is distributed by the German company Haba. The documentation, including instructions for gameplay, accompanying INSEL DER SCHMUGGLER is provided herewith and is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.

Other board games are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 601,383, 1,519,666, 1,524,740, 2,268,433, 3,037,773, 3,103,080, 3,721,443, 3,985,361, 4,128,246, 4,955,616, 5,405,148, 5,478,086, 6,123,334, 6,203,017, 6,565,090, 6,871,853, and U.S. Patent Application Publication Nos. 2005/0017450 and 2005/0023749, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.

SUMMARY

Board games and methods of playing board games with game boards divided into a plurality of regions are provided. A game board includes a pathway defined by a plurality of spaces including a set of safe spaces, a set of danger spaces, and a set of token spaces. Movement of playing pieces along the pathway is determined by a movement indication device. A set of collection tokens is also provided for collection when a player's playing piece lands on a token space. Means for determining a single active region of the plurality of regions is provided to instruct players to forfeit a collected token if the player's playing piece is on a danger space when a region becomes active.

In some embodiments, the means for determining a single active region includes an active region designation device and a set of region tokens having instructional indicia for manipulating the active region designation device. In some embodiments, the means for determining a single active region includes a set of collection cards. The set of collection cards includes subsets of collection cards with instructional indicia for manipulating the active region designation device when a predetermined number of collection cards are collected by a player. In some embodiments, the game board includes indicia of structures, and the safe spaces are spaces that are simulatedly hidden behind the structures from a given point on the game board, while the danger spaces are spaces that are not hidden behind the structures from the given point on the game board.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a board game according to the present disclosure, including a game board with an active region selection device, playing pieces for movement around the game board, and associated cards and tokens used during game play.

FIG. 2 illustrates a set of tokens for use with board games according to the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 illustrates a set of cards for use with board games according to the present disclosure.

FIG. 4 illustrates another set of cards for use with board games according to the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Collection board games with game boards having a plurality of regions and means for determining an active region are described herein. An exemplary embodiment of a board game according to the present disclosure is illustrated in FIG. 1 and generally indicated at 10. Board games according to the present disclosure may include one or more of a game board 12 with a plurality of regions 14, a plurality of playing pieces, or movers, 16 for movement around the game board, a movement indication device 18 for determining movement of the playing pieces, a plurality of tokens 20, and a plurality of cards 22. Means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions are also provided and may include one or more of a set of the plurality of tokens, a set of the plurality of cards, and an active region designation device 24.

Game 10 is depicted in the figures incorporating a theme corresponding to the animated television series TEEN TITANS®; however, any suitable theme (or no theme at all) may be incorporated into board games according to the present disclosure.

Referring initially to the exemplary game board 12 depicted in FIG. 1, game boards according to the present disclosure include a pathway 26 defined by a plurality of spaces 28 for movement of playing pieces 16 around the game board. The plurality of spaces may define the pathway as a continuous closed loop such that the pathway does not intersect itself (as is common in board games), as a continuous open loop (or other suitable shape) such that there are distinct end spaces to the pathway, or, as depicted in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1, as a series of interconnecting paths such that the pathway includes intersections, T-junctions, and/or other junctions and intersections.

The pathway may include a start space or spaces for initial placement of the playing pieces (i.e., each playing piece may have its own designated start space or a single start space may be provided for initial placement of all of the playing pieces). The pathway may also have an end space, to which a player may be required to move his playing piece to, upon accomplishing a predetermined task or goal in order to win the game. The end space may be distinct from the start space, or it may be the same as the start space.

The exemplary pathway depicted in FIG. 1 includes a single start/end space 30, on which the playing pieces are initially placed for game play and to which a player must return his/her playing piece upon completing the predetermined task of the game, as will be understood from a more detailed discussion of the various game components and methods of game play discussed below. In the depicted embodiment incorporating the TEEN TITANS® animated television series theme, the start/end space may be referred to as the TITAN TOWER.

The plurality of spaces defining the pathway may include one or more sets of spaces which may be distinguished by distinct indicia. For example, sets of spaces may be distinguished by color, by shape of space, or by any suitable indicia such that players of the board game may readily identify what set of spaces a given space along the pathway belongs. The various sets of spaces may have different meanings or provide different instructions for game play as appropriate for a particular embodiment of the board game. For example, some sets of spaces may require (or provide as an option for) a player to actively perform a particular task when his/her playing piece lands on a space within a particular set of spaces. For example, a player may be required to draw a card or a token, may be given the option to draw a card or a token, may be required to forfeit a token, or may be required to (or given the option to) perform any other suitable task as may be appropriate for a particular embodiment of the board game.

Other sets of spaces may simply be neutral spaces. For example, when a player's playing piece lands on a neutral space, the player may not be required actively perform a task. His/her turn may simply be over, and play may continue with the next player of the board game (e.g., the player situated in the next clockwise position). The various sets of spaces defining the pathway may additionally share common spaces (i.e., a space may require a player to both draw a card and forfeit a token depending on other factors of the game as will be understood from a more detailed discussion of the various game components and methods of game play discussed below). In other words, some sets of spaces may be subsets of other sets of spaces, and/or two or more sets of spaces may share only some common spaces while having other spaces that are not shared (i.e., some sets of spaces may intersect other sets of spaces).

The exemplary pathway depicted in FIG. 1, in addition to start/end space 30 discussed above, includes at least four sets of spaces: a set of safe spaces 32, a set of danger spaces 34, a set of token spaces 36, and a set of card spaces 38. The set of safe spaces are indicated as white generally rectangular spaces. The set of danger spaces are indicated as shaded generally rectangular spaces or circular spaces. The set of token spaces are indicated as circular spaces (i.e., in the depicted exemplary embodiment, the set of token spaces is a subset of the set of danger spaces; however, as discussed, not all embodiments require such a relationship). The set of token spaces may also be referred to as pizza parlor spaces. The set of card spaces are indicated by a star-burst indicia, and intersects both the set of safe spaces and the set of danger spaces (i.e., in the depicted embodiment, every card space is also either a safe space or a danger space). The various functions of the various sets of spaces will be readily understood from the more detailed discussion of the various game components and methods of game of play discussed below.

In addition to a pathway, game boards according to the present disclosure may also include various indicia about the game board that relate to the distinctness of the set of safe spaces and the set of danger spaces. In the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, game board 12 includes indicia of structures 40. Specifically, the structures illustrated represent or simulate buildings interspersed among the interconnecting paths that define pathway 26; however, other indicia may equally be incorporated into game boards according to the present disclosure.

The indicia of structures 40 directly relate to the distinctness between the set of safe spaces and the set of danger spaces, in that the set of safe spaces are behind the indicia as determined from a given point on the board, while the set of danger spaces are not behind the buildings as determined from the given point on the board (e.g., a point in the center of the board in the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1). In other words, in embodiments where the game board simulates a city, a simulated character standing at the center of the board would not be able to see the safe spaces because they are hidden behind the simulated buildings. Stated differently, the safe spaces are spaces that are simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from simulated lines of sight from a given point on the game board. In contrast, the danger spaces are spaces that are not simulatedly hidden behind the indicia of structures from the simulated lines of sight.

In some embodiments, the sets of safe spaces and danger spaces may change during game play. For example, the board game may incorporate moveable indicia of structure that may be moved by players in accordance with various aspects of game play. In such embodiments, the safe and danger spaces, rather than being distinguishable by color as discussed above and depicted in FIG. 1, may instead only be distinguishable by their relationship to the indicia of structure and the given point on the game board from where the simulated lines of sight originate. One non-exclusive example of a game board incorporated this type of scheme, may include three-dimensional structures that are placed in different spaces on the game board in response to the various aspects of the board game instructing players to do so. As such, when a structure is moved from one location to another, the sets of safe spaces and dangers spaces may change accordingly.

Game boards according to the present disclosure may be divided into a plurality of regions as discussed. Any suitable number of regions of uniform or varying size may be provided and be incorporated into a game board. The exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1 incorporates four regions, or quadrants, that are equal in size and spaced evenly about the board. As shown, the regions are indicated generally by two lines 42, 44 that generally diagonally bisect game board 12, thereby creating a first quadrant 46, a second quadrant 48, a third quadrant 50, and a fourth quadrant 52.

The regions of the game board may be integral to the game play of a board game according to the present disclosure. For example, one or more regions may be said to be active at a given time. When a region is active, the danger spaces within that region (i.e., a subset of the set of danger spaces) may become active. For example, in the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1 incorporating the TEEN TITAN® theme, the center of the board may represent the villains' headquarters. When the villains are alerted to a particular region of the city (by various game mechanisms discussed in detail below), the villains may be said to be looking into that particular region from their headquarters. Thus, if a player's playing piece is on a danger space of the particular region that is active, then the villains can see the player, and the player is in danger. When this occurs, various aspects of the game may be triggered as will be discussed in more detail below in reference to the various game components and methods of game play according to the present disclosure.

To facilitate indication of an active region, board games according to the present disclosure may include an active region designation device 24. The active region designation device may be any suitable device for indicating to the players which region of the plurality of regions is active at any given time. In the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, the active region designation device is comprised of a circular disc 54 mounted to the center of the game board and configured to rotate about a vertical axis, and may be referred to as a range of sight disc, a villain disc, or any other appropriate description. The disc may be comprised of a larger top disc attached to a smaller bottom disc by a metal brad. The bottom disc may be configured to be inserted into a corresponding hole, or depression, in the game board in a snug-fit configuration such that the top disc may generally rotate relative to the bottom disc, about the metal brad, in response to user manipulation.

The disc includes indicia of villains within a defined region of the disc, as indicated at 56. Defined region 56 may also be referred to as a red triangle or the range of sight. Thus, disc 54 may be rotated about the vertical axis such that the defined region may line up with a particular region of the game board. In the depicted embodiment, defined region 56 of disc 54 is aligned with first quadrant 46, thereby indicating the first quadrant as the active region and the corresponding danger spaces within the first quadrant as active.

As mentioned, the active region designation device may be any suitable device for indicating to the players which region of the plurality of regions is active at any given time. For example, the active region designation device may be as simple as a pencil (or other writing implement) and paper, with which players of the board game simply write down which region is active at a given time.

Another device may include a die which, upon being rolled, indicates which region of the game board is active at a given time. For example, a standard six-sided die may be used for a board game with six regions. Any number of sided die or dice may be used for any suitable number of regions incorporated into a game board. For example, a six-sided die may be used for a game board incorporating four regions of a game board. In such an embodiment, a first region may be represented by one side of the die, a second region may be represented by one side of the die, a third region may be represented by two sides of the die, and a fourth region may be represented by two sides of the die.

Any suitable active region designation device that may be incorporated into a board game may be described as being, or being part of, means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions. Likewise, the plurality of tokens (or a set or subset thereof) and the plurality of cards (or a set or subset thereof), discussed in detail below, may also be described as being, or being part of, means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions.

As discussed, board games according to the present disclosure may include a movement indication device 18 for determining movement of the plurality of playing pieces along the pathway discussed above. For example, in the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 1, board game 10 includes a six-sided die 58. Different versions of board games may incorporate different configurations of a die. For example, in an exemplary embodiment, a six-sided die with indicia representing the numbers three through six may be used.

During game play, players may roll the die to determine how many spaces they are permitted to move their playing pieces during their respective turns. In the illustrated embodiment, a player may move his/her playing piece in any direction along the pathway according to the roll of the die. A player may be required to move exactly the number of spaces indicated on the die, or other movement indication device, or in some versions of the board game, a player may stop at a token space if the token space is a number of spaces away that is equal to or less than the number indicated on the die. In other words, if a player rolls a six, and the player's playing piece is four spaces away from a token space, he/she may (but is not required to) move his/her playing piece only four spaces and stop on the token space so that the player may then draw a token.

Though illustrated in the form of a six-sided die, movement indication devices according to the present disclosure may take any suitable form as may be appropriate for various embodiments of the board game. For example, the movement indication device may be more than one die, may be a die or dice with sides less than or greater than six, and with any suitable indicia of numbers. The movement indication device may be a spinner as is commonly used in children's board games. Any movement indication device generally configured to provide a random, simulated random, or at least arbitrary instruction for movement of the playing pieces may be incorporated into the board game and is within the scope of the present disclosure.

Board games according to the present disclosure may include tokens to be drawn by a player when his/her playing piece lands on a space of the set of token spaces discussed above. The exemplary embodiment of board game 10 depicted in the figures includes tokens in the form of generally circular paperboard tokens with indicia pertaining to various aspects of game play; however, any suitable structure configured to be drawn, chosen, selected, etc. by a player during game play and further configured to generally indicate to the players various aspects, functions, or instructions of game play may comprise the plurality of tokens and are within the present disclosure.

As shown in FIG. 1, game board 12 may include token indicia 60 located adjacent to the multiple spaces of the set of token spaces (shown as generally circular white spaces) discussed above. Token indicia 60 may provide a location on the board for placement of stacks of tokens during game play set-up. In other words, during set-up of board game 10, the tokens may be shuffled or mixed-up and distributed equally, or at least approximately equally, among the token indicia. During game play, when a player's playing piece lands on a token space, he/she may be required to draw a token from the stack of tokens located on the adjacent token indicia. In the exemplary embodiment depicted incorporating the TEEN TITANS® theme, the token indicia may be images of pizza parlors.

Turning now to FIG. 2, plurality of tokens 20 is illustrated. The plurality of tokens may have a common first side 62, such that the tokens may be generally indistinguishable from each other when stacked or placed face-down (i.e., with the common first side up). First side 62, in the exemplary embodiment, includes indicia of a pizza parlor corresponding to the token indicia on the game board discussed above.

The plurality of tokens may include one or more sets or subsets of tokens, the sets or subsets corresponding to different aspects of game play. For example, in the exemplary embodiment, the plurality of tokens may include a first set of tokens 64 with a common second side 66 including indicia of a pizza. First set of tokens 64 may be referred to as collection tokens, reward tokens, bomb tokens, exploding pizza tokens, exploding pepperoni tokens, or any other suitable description. The object of the game may be for players to collect a predetermined number of tokens from the first set of tokens and subsequently move his/her playing piece to a designated space on the board (e.g., the TEEN TOWER space discussed above). A subset 68 of first set of tokens 64 may include one or more tokens as just discussed but with the addition of further indicia 70, such as a number representing a value. For example, in versions of the board game where the object is to collect four collection tokens, a token with a numeral two indicated may count as two tokens toward the goal of collecting four. In versions of the board game incorporating a pizza parlor theme, a token from subset 68 may be referred to as an extra topping token or extra pepperoni token.

In some versions of the board game, players may be required to forfeit a collected token if his/her playing piece is on a danger space within a region that becomes active according to the active region designation device.

A second set of tokens 72 may also be incorporated into board games according to the present disclosure, and may include indicia corresponding to functions or aspects of game play different from that of the first set of tokens. Second set of tokens 72 depicted in FIG. 2 includes indicia corresponding to instructions for manipulation of the active region designation device, and may be referred to as range of sight tokens, trap tokens, pizza trap tokens, or any other suitable description.

In the exemplary embodiment of the board game, the second set of tokens includes subsets of tokens 74 including indicia for instructing a player to rotate disc 54 (shown in FIG. 1) a predetermined direction (e.g., clockwise) a given number of regions. For example, if a player draws a token with a number two indicated on it, he/she is instructed to rotate the disc clockwise two regions. Referring back to FIG. 1, if a player draws a token with a number two indicated on it when the disc is in its illustrated position (i.e., defined region 56 aligned with first quadrant 46), the player would be instructed to rotate the disc so that defined region 56 is subsequently aligned with third quadrant 50.

As shown in FIG. 2, subsets of tokens 74 may include subsets corresponding to rotation of disc 56 (shown in FIG. 1) one region, two regions, three regions, and four regions; however, any suitable number of regions may be indicated on second set of tokens 72 as may be appropriate for a particular embodiment of a board game according to the present disclosure. For example, board games according to the present disclosure may incorporate a number of subsets of tokens corresponding to the number of regions of the game board.

Any total number of tokens may be included in the board games including in any number of subsets of tokens of the second set of tokens, such that an appropriate number of tokens is available for use during game play. For example, in the depicted embodiment, game board 10 should be provided with enough tokens to be approximately evenly distributed among the token indicia indicated on the game board such that game play by four or five players is easily conducted without having to reshuffle and restack tokens during game play.

Other instructions may alternatively be provided on the plurality of tokens such that the tokens are generally configured to instruct a player to manipulate the active region designation device. For example, in embodiments of the board game incorporating a die as an active region designation device, the plurality of tokens may include instructions for the rolling of the die. In embodiments incorporating pencil and paper as an active region designation device, the instructions may direct a player to indicate a particular region on the paper or may instruct a player to perform a mathematical formula to determine the particular active region (e.g., a player may be instructed to add a number indicated on a token to the number corresponding to the previous active region, and if the sum is greater than the total number of regions, to subtract the total number of regions).

Second set of tokens 72 may be described as pizza traps tokens, range of sight tokens, villain tokens, or any other suitable description corresponding to or not corresponding to a theme of the game board. The second set of tokens may also be described as being part of means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions.

When tokens are forfeited or used (i.e., when a collected collection token is forfeited and when a range of sight token is used), such tokens may be placed face down in a pre-designated area next to the game board. In some versions of the board game, if during game play a stack of tokens becomes depleted, a player may shuffle or mix-up the forfeited and used tokens for replenishment of the stack. In other versions of the board game, if during game play a stack of tokens becomes depleted, then the players may not be allowed to replenish the stack (i.e., players may be required to go to an alternative token space in order to draw a token).

Board games according to the present disclosure may also include a plurality of cards to be drawn by players during game play according to any suitable instruction of game play. For example, a player may be required to (or permitted to) draw a card when his/her playing piece lands on a card space, passes a card space (i.e., without actually landing on it), and/or passes from one region of the game board to another region (i.e., crosses one of the two lines 42, 44 shown in FIG. 1); however any suitable instruction for drawing a card as may be appropriate for a particular embodiment of a board game according to the present disclosure may be incorporated.

The plurality of cards may include instructions for carrying out various aspects or functions of game play, and may be referred to as action cards, or any other appropriate description. The plurality of cards may include sets and subsets of cards with different instructions pertaining to different aspects of game play.

Referring to FIG. 3, a first set of cards 76 is illustrated for use with the exemplary board game 10 depicted in FIG. 1. First set of cards 76 may share a common back 78, and may include subsets of cards 80 including distinguishing indicia corresponding to various aspects, functions, and/or instructions of game play. First set of cards 76 may be referred to as defense or gadget cards. In the exemplary embodiment depicted, first set of cards 76 includes a first subset of cards 82, a second subset of cards 84, a third subset of cards 86, and a fourth subset of cards 88; however, any number of subset of cards may be provided and incorporated into a board game according to the present disclosure. Each subset of cards may include a plurality of cards of identical (or at least indistinguishable) indicia as may be appropriate for a particular embodiment of game board corresponding to factors such as number of players, etc.

First subset of cards 82 is illustrated including indicia of a pizza parlor, and may be referred to as pizza parlor cards. If a player draws a card from the first subset of cards, he/she may be permitted to move his/her playing piece to any token space (i.e., the circular spaces indicated in FIG. 1) on the game board, and thereafter draw a token from the adjacent stack of tokens as discussed above. In some embodiments, a pizza parlor card may be held by a player and used, or turned in, during a subsequent turn at the player's discretion.

Second subset of cards 84 is illustrated including indicia of an abstract energy field, and may be referred to as force shield cards. If a player draws a card from the second subset of cards, he/she may be permitted to avoid forfeiture of a collected collection token if and/or when his/her playing piece is on a danger space in a region of the board game that becomes active. In other words, if a player draws a card from the second set of cards, he/she may be permitted to hold on to it until a time when his/her playing piece is on a danger space that becomes active during game play, at which time the player may use the card in order to avoid having to forfeit a collected collection token, as is generally required under such circumstances.

In some versions of board games according to the present disclosure, if a player does not have any collected collection tokens when his/her playing piece is on a danger space within an active region, his/her playing piece is automatically moved back to the start space. In such versions, a card from the second set of cards, or force field card, may also be used to prevent being moved back to the start space.

Third subset of cards 86 is illustrated including indicia of a handheld communication device, and may be referred to as T-communication cards. If a player draws a card from the third subset of cards, he/she may be permitted to switch his/her playing piece with any other player's playing piece on the board. In some versions of the board game, the player may immediately use the T-communication card. Additionally or alternatively, in some versions of the board game, the player may be permitted to hold on to the T-communication card and use it during a subsequent turn at the player's discretion.

Fourth subset of cards 88 is illustrated including indicia of handheld grappling guns, and may be referred to as grappling gun cards. If a player draws a card from the fourth subset of cards, he/she may be permitted to take, or steal, a collected collection token from any other player. In some versions of the board game, a grappling gun card may be used immediately upon being drawn, and additionally or alternatively in some versions it may be used during a subsequent turn at the player's discretion.

One or more cards may be provided corresponding to the aforementioned sets of defense cards. A uniform number of each set may be provided, or alternatively different sets of defense cards may include different numbers of cards. For example, in some embodiments of the board game, a pizza parlor card may be considered to be more valuable than a T-communication card. As such, fewer number of pizza parlor cards may be provided. Also, other sets of cards may also be provided and incorporated into board games according to the present disclosure that generally fall into a defense card category (i.e., belong to the first set of cards), and board games are not limited solely to the aforementioned four subsets of defense cards.

Referring to FIG. 4, a second set of cards 90 is illustrated for use with the exemplary board game 10 depicted in FIG. 1. Second set of cards 90 may share a common back 78 with the first set of cards 76 (shown in FIG. 3 and just discussed), and may include subsets of cards 92 including distinguishing indicia corresponding to various aspects, functions, and/or instructions of game play. The second set of cards may be referred to as villain cards. In the exemplary embodiment depicted, four subsets of cards are incorporated into the board game, and each subset represents a villain pertaining to the TEEN TITANS® theme.

Each subset of cards includes indicia relating to manipulation of the active region designation device. In the exemplary cards illustrated in FIG. 4, such indicia instructs a player to rotate disc 56 (shown in FIG. 1) a predetermined direction (e.g., clockwise) a given number of regions as indicated by a numeral. As shown in FIG. 4, a first 94, a second 96, a third 98, and a fourth 100 subset of cards may include the numerals one, two, three, and four, respectively.

In order to activate the function of villain cards (i.e., manipulate the active region designation device) according to the indicia imprinted thereon, players may be required to collect a predetermined number of cards within a subset of cards. This predetermined number of cards may be referred to as a meld. For example, players may be required to collect three like villain cards before being allowed to use (or turn in) the cards for manipulation of the active region designation device. In other words, once a player has collected a meld of the first set of cards 94, he/she may use the cards to rotate the disc one region. Similarly, once a player has collected a meld of the second set of cards 96, he/she may use the cards to rotate the disc two regions, and so on.

In some versions of the board game, each subset of villain cards requires the same number of cards to form a meld (e.g., three). In other version of the board game, different subsets of villain cards may require different numbers of cards to form a meld. In the latter versions, the set of villain cards may include additional indicia designating the number of cards required for a meld for a particular subset of villain cards.

The second set of cards, or villain cards, may also be described as being part of means for determining an active region of the plurality of regions.

When a card is drawn by a player, whether a defense card or a villain card, the player may be permitted to place it face down or hold it such as to prevent the other players from viewing what card was drawn. When a card or cards are used by a player (i.e., when a defense card is used or when a meld of villain cards is used), such card or cards may be placed face down in a pre-designated area next to the game board. In some versions of the board game, if during game play the stack of un-drawn cards becomes depleted, the players may shuffle or mix-up the used cards for replenishment of the stack. In other versions of the board game, if during game play the stack of un-drawn cards becomes depleted, the players may not be permitted to replenish the stack and must therefore continue the game without the ability to further draw cards.

Various aspects of the exemplary components and functions thereof may be modified from that disclosed above, and may be reflected in a set of rules or instructions to accompany the board game. The rules may thus be configured to provide a game with a desired degree of complexity or difficulty, for example to adapt the game to players of a predetermined age range.

In view of the above detailed description of the various game components, one non-exclusive exemplary set of rules or instructions for playing a board game according to the present disclosure may be as follows:

For ages six an older.

For two to five players.

Contents

One Game Board

Five TEEN TITANS® Movers

Thirty Six Pizza Tokens

Fifty Six Action Cards (Thirty Villain, Twenty Six Gadget)

One Villains' Range-of-Sight Disk

One Die (numbered three through eight)

The Mission

In pizza parlors throughout the city, Slade and his band of Villains have topped some pizzas with exploding pepperonis set to destroy everything . . . including the TEEN TITANS®! You must join forces with the teenaged superheroes to find and defuse these perilous pizzas before it's too late. But stay alert: Slade, Brother Blood, Blackfire and Johnny Rancid will be looking for you, and they have set traps to keep you from succeeding. Do you have what it takes to thwart Slade and save the city?

Object

Be the first Player to nab four Exploding Pepperoni Tokens and get them safely back to TITAN TOWER.

Preparing for Battle

Open the Game Board and place it within reach of all Players.

Each Player selects a TEEN TITANS® Mover and places it on TITAN TOWER (Start).

Shuffle the Villain and Gadget Cards together and place them facedown near the Game Board within reach of all Players. These are the Action Cards.

Shuffle the Pizza Tokens and randomly place four tokens facedown on each of the Pizza Parlor Spaces scattered throughout the city.

Snap the Villains' Range-of-Sight Disc into place in the center of the board and rotate it so that the red triangle faces the TITAN TOWER.

The youngest Player goes first, and Players take turns clockwise.

TEEN TITANS®, Go!

On your turn, roll the Die and move that number of spaces in any direction you wish.

Players cannot share spaces. If you land on an occupied space, jump ahead to the next unoccupied space.

Navigating Through the City

The City (Game Board) is divided into four quadrants, indicated by black lines that dissect the game board from corner to corner.

Every time you move into a new City quadrant or every time you pass over or land on a Pow! Burst, you must draw an Action Card (see Action Cards). It is possible to draw up to four Action Cards in one turn. Example: If you move into a new quadrant, pass over a Pow! Burst, and then pass into a different quadrant, you must draw three Cards.

Draw the Action Cards one at a time, and play any Villain Card drawn immediately (see Action Cards).

NOTE: If you move into a new quadrant or pass over a Pow! Burst and then land on a Pizza Parlor Space, draw a card before drawing a Pizza Token (see Pizza Parlor Spaces).

Landmarks

Pizza Parlor Spaces: The Pizza Parlor Spaces are yellow circles (depicted as white circles in the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1) near the Pizza Parlors. Whenever you land on a Pizza Parlor Space, you get to collect a Pizza Token from that pile. You do not need to have an exact roll to land on a Pizza Parlor Space, but that space cannot be occupied by another Player. Beware: Pizza Parlor Spaces are ALWAYS exposed to the Villains' Range of Sight (see Villains' Range-of-Sight-Disk). The token you nab may be one of the following:

Exploding Pepperoni Tokens: Good work! You've found one of the Exploding Pepperonis. Keep the Token in front of you until you have collected enough to race back to TITAN TOWER. You can have up to five Exploding Pepperoni Tokens (but no more than that). You will need four to win, but you may lose some along the way, so stay alert!

Extra Topping: There is one Exploding Pepperoni Token that features a numeral two. Having that token is equal to having two Exploding Pepperoni Tokens!

Pizza Trap Tokens: You've accidentally set off a trap and activated the Villains' Range-of-Sight Disc! Turn the Disc clockwise the number shown on the Token and resolve the action (see Villains' Range-of-Sight-Disk).

Red and Gray Spaces (depicted as shaded and white generally rectangular spaces, respectively, in the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1): Players on the Red Spaces are exposed to the Villains' Range of Sight, while Players on the Gray Spaces are hidden from the Villains' Range of Sight, when the Range-of-Sight Disc is activated (see Villains' Range-of-Sight-Disk).

Villains' Range-of-Sight-Disc

The red area (defined region 56 in the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1) on the Villains' Range-of-Sight Disc indicates which of the four quadrants the Villains can see at any given time. The Villains can only see into one quadrant at a time, and their range of sight changes throughout the game as the Disc is activated (rotated).

The Disc is activated whenever a Player draws a Pizza Trap Token or completes a Set of Villain Cards (see Action Cards).

When the Disc is activated, rotate it clockwise the number shown on the Token drawn, or the number on the Villain Card that completed the Set (see Villain Cards). Count each Quadrant that the red area on the Disc passes as one. When the rotation is complete, the red area on the Disc indicates the Quadrant that the Villains can see, and any Movers in that area are affected as follows:

Players on Gray Spaces are safely hidden, and the Villains cannot see them (these Spaces are located behind buildings).

Players on Red Spaces or Pizza Parlor Spaces are exposed and must discard one of the Exploding Pepperoni Tokens they have already found (create a discard pile off the Board; Tokens can be shuffled and redistributed on the Board later if needed).

If a Player who has been seen by the Villains does not have an Exploding Pepperoni Token to return, that Player must return to TITAN TOWER.

Players are only affected by the Villains' Range-of-Sight Disc if they are already in the area indicated by the Disc at the time the Disc is rotated. On subsequent turns, Players can freely move through an area that the Disc is facing without consequence.

Action Cards

Villain Cards: Whenever a Player draws a Villain Card, it is immediately placed faceup next to the Game Board. All Players will place any Villain Card they draw in the same area, collectively building sets of three-of-a-kind. For instance, a Player who draws the Slade Card will place it next to any other Slade Cards already faceup. When a Player draws a third Slade Card, the set is complete.

Once a Set, or three-of-a-kind, is completed, the Villains' Range-of-Sight Disc is activated. The Disc will be rotated the number displayed on the Villain Card that completed the Set (Example: Slade has a number four, so the Disc will be rotated four Quadrants).

After the Disc has been rotated, check to see if any of the Players are affected (see Villains Range-of-Sight Disc), then discard the three Villain Cards that completed the Set.

Gadget Cards: Gadget Cards help you navigate through the City and defend yourself against the Villains. Whenever you draw a Gadget Card, keep it in your hand without letting other Players see it until you are ready to use it.

You may hold up to six Gadget Cards at a time (if you draw a seventh Gadget Card, you must discard one Card of your choice).

When you play a Gadget Card, it must be at the beginning of your turn and it takes the place of rolling the Die (Exception: see the Force Shield Card).

There are four types of Gadget Cards:

Pizza Parlor Card: Move to ANY Pizza Parlor Space on the Game Board and collect a Pizza Token (If you draw a Pizza Trap, you must still activate the Disc).

Force Shield Card: If the Disc is activated and you suddenly find yourself in their range of sight, play this card immediately and it will shield you from their view! This card is your only defense against the Villains when you are on an Exposed Space, thus, it can be played when it is not your turn.

T-COMMUNICATOR™ Card: Play this Card to switch places with any other Player. If you move yourself to a Pizza Parlor Space, you may draw a Pizza Token. However, if you move the other Player to a Pizza Parlor Space, that Player may NOT draw a token during this swap (that Player must move off the Space and then return to that Space on subsequent turns in order to collect a Token from that Space).

Grappling Gun Card: Oops! One of your opponents is a very clumsy superhero and dropped an Exploding Pepperoni Token! Take one Exploding Pepperoni Token from any other Player.

Victory

The first Player to return to TITAN TOWER with four Exploding Pepperoni Tokens has saved the City and won the game!

Various aspects of this exemplary set of instructions may be modified from that disclosed above. The instructions may thus be configured to provide a game with a desired degree of complexity or difficulty, for example to adapt the game to a predetermined number of players and/or to players of a predetermined age range.

It is believed that the disclosure set forth above encompasses multiple distinct inventions with independent utility. While each of these inventions has been disclosed in a preferred form or method, the specific embodiments and/or methods thereof as disclosed and illustrated herein are not to be considered in a limiting sense, as numerous variations are possible. The present disclosure includes all novel and non-obvious combinations and subcombinations of the various elements, features, functions, properties, steps and/or methods disclosed herein. Similarly, where any disclosure above or claim below recites “a” or “a first” element, step of a method, or the equivalent thereof, such disclosure or claim should be understood to include incorporation of one or more such elements or steps, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements or steps.

Inventions embodied in various combinations and subcombinations of features, functions, elements, and/or properties may be claimed through presentation of new claims in a related application. Such new claims, whether they are directed to a different invention or directed to the same invention, whether different, broader, narrower or equal in scope to the original claims, are also regarded as included within the subject matter of the present disclosure.