Title:
Compact trampoline packaging
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A new system and method for packaging a disassembled trampoline and trampoline enclosure is described. This method is designed so that both the trampoline and the trampoline enclosure will fit into one or more boxes that may be fit upon a standard sized pallet. As is known in the industry, pallets are generally 48″×40″, and thus, the packaged trampoline and enclosure will not exceed this size. Further embodiments may also be constructed in which trampoline and trampoline enclosure are packaged in two separate boxes. However, the specific contents of the particular boxes are adjusted to balance the weight of the particular boxes.



Inventors:
Colling, Michael J. (Brigham City, UT, US)
Application Number:
11/439736
Publication Date:
11/30/2006
Filing Date:
05/24/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B5/11
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ROLAND, DANIEL F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KIRTON MCCONKIE (SALT LAKE CITY, UT, US)
Claims:
1. A method for packaging a trampoline system that includes a trampoline frame and a safety enclosure, the packaging method comprising: dividing parts for the trampoline and trampoline enclosure into at least two groups of approximately equal weight, wherein parts for the trampoline frame include at least ten sections; and placing one group of parts into a trampoline box and the other group into a trampoline enclosure box, wherein both the trampoline enclosure box and the trampoline box have dimensions smaller than dimensions of a standard-sized pallet such that the trampoline enclosure box and the trampoline box fit on a standard-sized pallet.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the trampoline frame has at least sixteen pieces.

3. The method of claim 2, wherein the trampoline frame is designed such that, when the frame is fully assembled, the trampoline frame has a circular shaped and has a circular diameter of about 15 feet.

4. The method as in claim 1 further comprising the step of placing trampoline springs in the trampoline enclosure box.

5. The method of claim 1 wherein the trampoline has a square or rectangular shape.

6. The method of claim 1 wherein the trampoline box and the trampoline enclosure box, when filled, each weigh about 130 pounds and have dimensions that are about 46.5″×20″×13″.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 45 feet.

8. The method of claim 1 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 50 feet.

9. The method of claim 1 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 55 feet.

10. The method as in claim 1 wherein the trampoline frame is divided into sections having a length less than four feet.

11. A method for packaging a trampoline system that includes a trampoline frame having a perimeter or circumference greater than about 40 feet, the packaging method comprising: dividing the trampoline frame into ten or more distinct sections, wherein each section has a length less than four feet; and placing the trampoline frame sections and additional trampoline parts into one or more boxes that have dimensions smaller than dimensions of a standard-sized pallet such that the one or more boxes fit on a standard-sized pallet.

12. The method of claim 11 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 45 feet.

13. The method of claim 11 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 50 feet.

14. The method of claim 11 wherein the trampoline frame has a perimeter or circumference greater than about 55 feet.

15. The method of claim 11, wherein the trampoline frame is designed such that, when the frame is fully assembled, the trampoline frame has a circular shape.

16. The method of claim 11, wherein the trampoline frame is designed such that, when the frame is fully assembled, the trampoline has a square or rectangular shape.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCED RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/684,108 filed May 24, 2005. This provisional application is expressly incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Trampolines are widely known and used for a variety of recreational and athletic purposes. Recreational and “backyard” use of trampolines is very popular. Parents often buy a trampoline so that their children can enjoy hours of diversion playing and “jumping” on the trampoline.

As a result of careless use of trampolines and poorly designed/manufactured systems, personal injury has occurred. Such injuries have resulted from a person jumping too close to the edge of the trampoline surface such that the person would either (1) fall off of the trampoline or would (2) strike the frame, springs, a tree, or another hard surface positioned proximate the trampoline's boundary. Of course, such injuries are a grave concern for many trampoline manufacturers and trampoline enthusiasts.

In order to prevent these types of injuries, trampolines have recently been sold and produced having a flexible fence or enclosure that surrounds the perimeter of the trampoline's rebounding surface. One example of this type of trampoline is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,053,845 (which will be referred to herein as the “'845 patent” and is expressly incorporated herein by reference).

In trampolines that include a flexible enclosure, any person that jumps on the trampoline will be maintained on the interior of the trampoline. Thus, when the child approaches the edge of the trampoline's rebounding mat, the enclosure will prevent the child from falling off the trampoline. Likewise, because the enclosure is made of a flexible material (such as netting, mesh, etc.), the enclosure will also prevent the child from harmfully impacting the trampoline's frame, springs, or other hard surfaces. In this manner, the enclosure will greatly increase the safety of the trampoline.

Trampolines are manufactured in various shapes and sizes, including circular, rectangular, square, octagonal, and other shapes. Circular trampolines have a jumping surface (or “rebounding mat”) that often has a diameter ranging from 12 to 16 feet. Thus, the circumference of this jumping surface may exceed 36 feet. This large circular jumping surface is supported by an even larger metal frame that is divided into anywhere from 4 to 8 sections. Such sections of the frame will be curved and will have a length that is at least 6 feet long. Square and rectangular trampolines typically have a metal frame with a perimeter that substantially exceed 38 feet. These large frames are also divided into smaller sections that have a length exceeding four feet.

The sections of the frame may also include one or more openings/attachments that are designed to receive metal legs. These metal legs will support the frame and the jumping surface above the ground. The position of the openings/attachments on the frame sections does not, necessarily, have to be uniformly spaced about the circumference.

Unfortunately, the size of trampolines and the shape/size of the frame sections present significant challenges for trampoline manufacturers that are attempting to ship trampolines from a production facility. Not only will such shipping be expensive (due to the weight of the trampoline system), but the box/container used to contain the trampoline parts must likewise be large and bulky. For example, a typical trampoline box of a conventional 15 foot circular trampoline may have dimensions of (about) 68 inches long, 21 inches wide, and 21 inches high.

The use of such large boxes, however, creates additional problems for retailers. Generally, retailers (including large retailers such as Sam's Club®, Wal-Mart®, Costco®, etc.) move their inventory from their warehouse/storage facility by stacking the boxes containing the inventory onto standard-sized pallets. These pallets are generally 48 inches long by 40 inches wide. Once the boxes are put on the pallets, a forklift (or other carrier) may then be used to carry the pallets and the boxes to the showroom floor so that they may be displayed and purchased by customers.

However, because most prior art trampoline boxes are larger than the standard 48″×40″ pallet, retailers cannot use standard pallets and fork lifts to move trampolines. This is a significant disadvantage in that it requires retailers to expend additional time and resources in moving, shipping, and/or storing these boxes. In fact, many retailers simply choose not to carry trampolines in their inventory because they do not believe that potential profits from trampoline sales will offset the costs/difficulties associated with storing/transporting the trampoline boxes

Large-sized trampoline and trampoline boxes make it difficult for trampoline owners attempting to store their trampolines during the winter months. Thus, trampoline owners may also benefit from a trampoline that may be compactly stored.

Accordingly, it would beneficial to provide a new type of trampoline and/or trampoline packaging system that would allow the trampoline to fit neatly into a pallet-sized box (i.e., a box that has dimensions that are less than or equal to 48″×40″. Such a device and system is disclosed herein.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present embodiments teach a new method for packaging a trampoline and/or a trampoline enclosure. This new method will generally involve ensuring that both the trampoline enclosure and the trampoline may fit into a box that has dimensions that are less than or equal to the dimensions of a standard sized pallet (48″×40″). In order to accomplish this, the trampoline frame and/or pieces of the trampoline enclosure may be divided up to pieces that are less than 48 inches in length.

Further embodiments may also be constructed in which two boxes are used, one for the trampoline and one for the trampoline enclosure. Various components of the trampoline may be placed in the trampoline enclosure box in order to redistribute the weight between the two boxes. For example, the springs of the trampoline may be placed in the trampoline enclosure box. Similarly, components of the trampoline enclosure may be placed in the trampoline box in order to redistribute the weight. In some embodiments, the components are distributed between the two boxes such that the weight of the trampoline enclosure box (when filled) is equal to and/or substantially equal to the weight of the trampoline box. Specifically, embodiments may be made in which both boxes weigh about 130 pounds (when filled).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

In order that the manner in which the above-recited and other features and advantages of the invention are obtained will be readily understood, a more particular description of the invention briefly described above will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof which are illustrated in the appended drawings. Understanding that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are not therefore to be considered to be limiting of its scope, the invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a trampoline and a trampoline enclosure that may be packaged according to the methods herein;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of two boxes that may be used in the present packaging method;

FIG. 3 is perspective view of the components of the trampoline and the trampoline enclosure that may be packaged;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of one of the steps of the packaging method which shows the first step in arranging the components in the boxes;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one of the steps of the packaging method which shows the first step in arranging the components in the boxes;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of one of the steps of the packaging method which shows the first step in arranging the components in the boxes

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of one of the steps of the packaging method which shows the first step in arranging the components in the boxes; and

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of one of the steps of the packaging method which shows the first step in arranging the components in the boxes.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The presently preferred embodiments of the present invention will be best understood by reference to the drawings, wherein like parts are designated by like numerals throughout. It will be readily understood that the components of the present invention, as generally described and illustrated in the figures herein, could be arranged and designed in a wide variety of different configurations. Thus, the following more detailed description of the embodiments of the present invention, as represented in the Figures, is not intended to limit the scope of the invention, as claimed, but is merely representative of presently preferred embodiments of the invention.

As described in greater detail above, trampolines and trampoline systems may be designed with safety enclosures that surround the trampoline's rebounding surface. A typical example of such a trampoline and a safety enclosure is found in the '845 patent. Accordingly, the reader should review the '845 patent for a description of these types of features.

Those of skill in the art will recognize that the system shown in the '845 patent is simply one example of a trampoline and enclosure system that may be used. Other types of trampoline and enclosure systems fall within the scope of the present invention. In fact, another type of system, in which the poles that support the enclosure are attached to the trampoline frame via brackets and/or swaging is described in U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/684,105 entitled “Trampoline Enclosure Attachment Receptor” (which provisional application is incorporated herein by reference).

Referring now to FIG. 1, a trampoline 10 and a trampoline enclosure 12 is illustrated. The trampoline will generally include a rebounding mat 14 and a frame 16 that supports the mat 14. The frame will be elevated off the ground by a plurality of the legs 18 that attach to and support the frame 16. As is known in the art, the rebounding mat 14 will be attached to the frame via a plurality of springs 20. Generally, the springs 20 are attached to the frame 16 and the mat 14 in such a way that a user may “jump” on the mat 14. A frame pad 22 may be positioned over the springs 20 to prevent the user from accidentally being injured by jumping on the springs 20 or coming in contact with the frame 16.

As shown in FIG. 1, a pair of the legs 18 may be attached to a support 19 that is positioned on the ground to support the trampoline 10. In some embodiments, one or more of the supports 19 are curved upwards such that a middle portion of the support 19 is off of the ground. As desired, one or more wheels 21 may be added to one or more of the supports 19 to facilitate movement of the trampoline 10.

The enclosure 12 may be, for example, similar to conventional enclosures, including the enclosure taught in the '845 patent. The enclosure 12 will generally comprise a plurality of poles 30 that are attached to the legs 18. The poles will extend upwards from the legs 18 such that they are positioned above the rebounding mat 14. As is shown in FIG. 1, trampoline enclosure systems may be constructed in which each of the legs 18 is connected to a separate pole 30. Thus, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, eight poles 30 are illustrated. Of course, other embodiments may also be constructed in which the number of legs 18 does not correspond to the number of poles 30. Other configurations of the trampoline 10, the poles 30, and/or the enclosure 12 may also be used.

As shown in FIG. 1, the poles 30 include an attachment piece 32 that is designed to connect two adjacent poles 30 together. In general, the attachment piece 32 will include openings that will receive the top of the pole 30, thereby forming an inverted U-shaped structure. Covering 34 may then be added over the top of the poles 30 and the attachment piece 32 to provide additional padding to the user.

The enclosure 12 also comprises a flexible material 36 that is coupled to the poles 30. In many embodiments, this flexible material 36 comprises netting made of polyethylene, nylon and/or other similar fabrics. The flexible material 36 will surround the periphery of the rebounding mat 14 and will be attached to the rebounding mat 14. As is known in the art, this flexible material 36 is designed to absorb the impact of forces, persons, etc. that collide against the enclosure 12 and prevent these individuals, etc. from falling off the rebounding mat 14. In general, the rebounding mat 14 will be coupled to the flexible material 36 through a variety of different methods, including those known methods disclosed in the '845 patent. However, other embodiments may be constructed in which the mat 14 is coupled to the flexible material 36/enclosure 12 via the methods taught in U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/684,107 (which provisional application is expressly incorporated herein by reference).

The flexible material 36 is also connected to the poles 30. This may occur by tying, adhesives, fasteners, threading the poles 30 through openings in the flexible material 36, and/or other methods of attachment known in the art. Other embodiments may have a portion of the flexible material 36 attached to the attachment pieces 32 via ties, loops, etc. A closable opening 40 may also be added to the enclosure 12 to allow a user to access the interior of the enclosure 12 so that he or she may “jump” on the rebounding mat 14. The opening 40 may be “closed” via the use of adhesive, ties, hook and loop fasteners, and/or other mechanisms. One or more pockets 38 may also be added to hold the user's shoes, wallet, possessions, etc.

The present invention relates to a packaging system that may be used to package the trampoline 10 and trampoline enclosure 12 for easy shipping and/or transport. The method of the present invention is designed such that the trampoline system may fit into two boxes, namely a “trampoline box” 44 and an “enclosure box” 46. The trampoline box 44 and the enclosure box 46 are shown in FIG. 2. In some embodiments, both of these boxes will be of durable cardboard. The boxes 44, 46 preferably have sufficient thickness, strength, and durability to retain the heavy trampoline and enclosure components without tearing or breaking. In one embodiment, the boxes 44, 46 are made of cardboard that is approximately 7 mm thick. Other box materials having sufficient durability and strength may also be used. Although not shown specifically in FIG. 2, lids for the boxes 44, 46 will also be added once the boxes are filled.

Generally, both the trampoline enclosure box 46 and the trampoline box 44 will fit upon the standard-sized pallet. As used herein, the terms “fit upon the standard-sized pallet” means that the box has length and width dimensions that are less than or equal to the standard-sized construction pallet. In other words, this phrase means that the length of both the trampoline box and the enclosure box is less than or equal to 48 inches and the width of both the trampoline box and the enclosure box is less than or equal to 40 inches. The height of the boxes may be about 21 inches.

Referring now to FIG. 3, a perspective view illustrates the pieces and components that may be used to construct the trampoline 10 and the trampoline enclosure 12 prior to these components/pieces being packaged into boxes 44, 46. Of course, in order to save space, the frame pad 22 and the pocket 38 have been folded into a compacted form. Likewise, in order to save space, the springs 20 have been housed within boxes 20a. Similarly, the flexible material 36 is attached and/or rolled within the mat 14. The covering 34 is divided up into multiple smaller sleeves that will fit over the poles 30. These pieces of the covering 34 may be bundled (such as with an elastic band or otherwise) for compaction. The wheels 21 are also illustrated in FIG. 3 as well as assembly instructions 42. Further, as shown in FIG. 3, one or more of the components of the trampoline 10 and the enclosure 12 may be wrapped (such as with plastic, bubblewrap, cellophane, etc.) for protection and/or compaction during the packaging process.

Hardware 50 is also added to the trampoline 10/enclosure 12. The hardware 50 may include 4 C-clips 52, 8 bolts 54, 8 nuts 56, 8 end caps 58 (to go on the underside of the poles 30), 24 self-tapping screws 60. Other connectors, fasteners, screws, etc. may also be used.

Some of the lengthy components may be divided into smaller, more easily packagable pieces. For example, the circular trampoline frame 16 will be divided into smaller sections including rounded frame tube pieces 16a and rounded tube socket pieces 16b. When placed together, the rounded frame tube pieces 16a will generally be placed between two socket pieces 16b. Of course, the pieces 16a, 16b will fit together to form the circular frame. In general, the total number of pieces 16a, 16b will be at least 10. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, there are about sixteen pieces 16b and eight pieces 16a. Of course, other embodiments will have greater or fewer number of pieces (depending on the size of the trampoline and other factors). In some embodiments anywhere from 12 to 16 pieces 16a, 16b, whereas further embodiments will have 16 or more pieces 16a, 16b. As noted above, most currently available trampoline frames are divided anywhere from 4 to 8 sections. Thus, the fact that the present invention will use many smaller pieces 16a, 16b to form the frame 16 means that, in general, the length of the sections will be shorter than that which is currently known by some prior art trampolines.

Although the trampolines have more pieces 16a, 16b than that which is previously used, it is important to note that the general shape and size of the frame, when completely connected, will be similar to other commercially available trampolines. For example, embodiments of the trampoline may be constructed in which the trampoline frame, when fully connected, will be circular, octagonal, square, or rectangular in shape. The trampoline frame may have a diameter or length of about 12 feet to about 16 feet. The circumferences or perimeter will typically exceed 40 feet, and is some embodiments, may exceed 45, 50 or 55 feet.

Further embodiments may be constructed in which the pieces 16a have a male portion on their end that will engage with a female portion of the pieces 16b. (These male/female portions may be circular, square, or take on other shapes.) These male portions are generally added to the frame sections via swaging or other similar methods. In general, these sections are configured such that the trampoline frame sections may be easily connected together and aligned. It will be appreciated that other geometric cross-sectional shapes may be use to join the frame sections, such as rectangular, triangular, etc. Such shapes perform the important function of inhibiting bending or twisting of the circular frame. Likewise, other embodiments may be constructed in which the pieces 16b have one or more male portions.

As described above, the pieces 16b of the frame will also attach to the poles 30 and/or the legs 18. Specifically, the pieces 16b may include one or more square T-brackets 51 (as described above) in order to engage/receive the poles 30. However, in order to compact the size of the boxes 44, 46, the legs 18 may be divided up into distinct sub-parts. Specifically, there may be 6 J-shaped legs 18a that and 2 L-shaped legs 18b, thereby making the total of 8 legs. The six J-shaped legs 18a correspond to three separate pairs of legs and are designed such that one of the three the curved leg supports 19a may be positioned between the each pair of J-shaped legs 18a. Again, the interaction between the pair of legs 18a and the leg support 19a will occur through male/female members, as described above. The interaction between the curved leg support 19a and the three pairs of J-shaped legs is shown in FIG. 1. The pair of L-shaped legs 18b is designed to receive the single straight support 18b (as well as the wheels 21), as is shown in FIG. 1. The wheels 21 will also go on the straight support 18b.

The poles 30 are also divided into smaller, more compactable pieces. Specifically, the poles 30 comprise straight pieces 30a, which are designed to engage and connect to the frame 16. As there are 8 individual poles 30, shown in FIG. 1, there will generally be 8 straight pieces 30a. Likewise, there will be 8 L-shaped pole pieces 30b that will attach onto the end of the straight pieces 30a. As is shown in FIG. 1, one of the attachment pieces 32 will engage and connect together two of the L-shaped pieces 30b.

Because the larger trampoline 10 and enclosure 12 have been divided into more manageable sizes, the trampoline 10 and the enclosure 12 may be packaged into the boxes 44, 46. In some embodiments, the parts associated with the trampoline 10 will be mixed and packaged with some of the parts of the enclosure 12, and vice versa. For example, the enclosure box 46 may house the trampoline springs 20. By placing the springs 20 in the enclosure box 46, the weight of the entire trampoline system is more evenly distributed between the trampoline box 44 and the trampoline enclosure box 46.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 through 8, the packaging and positioning of the various components of the trampoline 10 and the enclosure 12 will now be illustrated. Specifically, the steps in the packaging process will be illustrated. Specifically, FIG. 4 shows the layer of components that are placed in the boxes 44, 46 as part of the present compact packaging method. With respect to the trampoline box 44, the six J-shaped leg pieces 18a are positioned along the periphery of the box 44 and a plurality (four) of the frame socket pieces 16b are placed in the area between the legs 18a. With respect to the enclosure box 46, the leg supports 19a, 19b are positioned in the center of the box 46 adjacent to five of the of the straight pieces 30a of the poles 30. Generally, as many of the straight pieces 30a that can be fit into the layer of the box 46 will be positioned. At the left side of the box 46, two or more of the L-shaped pieces 30b will be positioned.

FIG. 5 represents the next “layer” of components that are added to the boxes 44, 46. Specifically, for trampoline box 44, the leg pieces 18a, 18b are positioned around the periphery of the box 44 and the remaining frame pieces 16b are positioned in the middle. Accordingly, all of the pieces 16b and the legs 18a, 18b are now packaged in the box 44. Of course, the pieces 18a, 18b, and 16a in the box 44 may be wrapped in plastic (as noted above), which is indicated on FIG. 5.

With respect to the enclosure box 46, the remaining straight pieces 30a are positioned cross-wise in the box 44 and additional L-shaped pieces 30b are positioned around the periphery. Accordingly, all of the L-shaped pieces 30b and the straight pieces 30a are in the box 46. The boxes 20a of springs 20 are then positioned into the area proximate the bend in the L-shaped pieces 30b.

With respect to FIG. 6, the next layer of components is added. Specifically, in this step, any remaining leg pieces 18a, 18b are positioned around the periphery of the box 44 and the remaining frame pieces 16b are positioned in the middle. However, with respect to the trampoline enclosure box 46, the pocket 38 is compacted and added between the pieces 30b and straight pieces 30a. One or more of the wheels 21 is also positioned adjacent to the pocket 38. The remaining wheels 21 are positioned on the opposite side of the cross-wise positioned straight pieces 30a. A bag 50a that includes all of the hardware 50 is also added proximate the corner of the box 46.

Referring now to FIG. 7, the next layer of components is then added to the boxes 44, 46. With respect to the box 44, the mat 14 is added which has the flexible material 36 rolled inside the mat 14. With respect to the box 46, one or more separators 70 are added, and the instructions 42 are placed along one side of the box 46.

FIG. 8 shows the final step in packaging the trampoline 10 and the trampoline enclosure 12. The coverings 34 are then stacked and added to the trampoline box 44 and the frame pad 22 is added to the box 46. The lids to the respective boxes 44, 46 may then be added to seal the boxes.

The benefits of the above-recited packaging method are readily apparent. The boxes 44, 46 will be sized to fit on a pallet. Specifically, the boxes 44, 46 may actually be smaller than pallet-sized boxes. In the illustrated embodiments, the boxes 44, 46 have dimensions of 46.5″×20″×13 inches. Each box 44, 46, when packed, will have roughly the same weight (which is about one hundred thirty pounds). Accordingly, these smaller boxes 44, 46 may be easily moved and handled by retailers. Moreover, as the standard pallet (noted above) is 48″×40″, both the boxes 44, 46 can be placed next to each other on one pallet to form a bundle that will be 46.5″×40″, which is still capable of fitting on the pallet and can easily be moved.

Other embodiments may similarly be packaged using a trampoline of a different circular radius and circumference. For example, if a circular shaped trampoline having a fifteen foot diameter that consists of 16 different sections of frame may be placed and packaged into two boxes, wherein each box has the following dimensions:

    • Length: 1186 mm (i.e., 46.7 inches)
    • Width: 505 mm (i.e., 19.9 inches)
    • Height: 385 mm (i.e., 15.2 inches).
      (The box “die lines” for these boxes will be found at 1178 mm, 498 mm, and 377 mm, respectively.)

Similarly, embodiments of the present invention may be constructed in which a circular shaped trampoline having a fourteen foot diameter that consists of 16 different sections of frame may be placed into two boxes, wherein each box has the following dimensions:

    • Length: 1180 mm (i.e., 46 inches)
    • Width: 505 mm (i.e., 20 inches)
    • Height: 355 mm (i.e., 14 inches).
      (The box “die lines” for these boxes will be found at 1172 mm, 498 mm, and 348 mm, respectively.)

Finally, embodiments of the present invention may be constructed in which a circular shaped trampoline having a twelve foot diameter that consists of 16 different sections of frame may be placed into two boxes, wherein each box has the following dimensions:

    • Length: 1170 mm (i.e., 46 inches)
    • Width: 505 mm (i.e., 20 inches)
    • Height: 320 mm (i.e., 14 inches).
      (The box “die lines” for these boxes will be found at 1162 mm, 498 mm, and 312 mm, respectively.)

It should also be noted that embodiments may also be constructed in which square, octagonal, or rectangular trampolines may be packaged in a similar manner. The square and rectangular trampolines are of a size and configuration often used for competitions. The trampoline and enclosure will be divided in a similar manner and will be packaged accordingly.

For some of these rectangular/square shaped trampolines, different sized tubing may be used for the frame. Specifically, in one embodiment, a 13×13 square trampoline, 2.5 inch tubing is used for the frame and 3 inch tubing is used for the legs. Other sizes of tubing may also be used. Similarly, for a 15 foot circular trampoline, various different sizes of tubing may be used and packaged according to the present embodiments. For example, embodiments may be constructed in which the enclosure poles have 1.5 inch diameter, the frame has a 1.75 inch diameter, and the legs have a 1.5 inch diameter. Other embodiments may be constructed in which the enclosure poles have 1.5 inch diameter, the frame has a 1.5 inch diameter, and the legs have a 1.75 inch diameter.

In summary, the present application discusses a new type of packaging method that may be used for trampolines and trampoline enclosures. The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its structures, methods, or other essential characteristics as broadly described herein and claimed hereinafter. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative, and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims, rather than by the foregoing description. All changes that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.