Title:
Training shoe with swivel attachment points and method of use
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A sport shoe provides a set of four rings each one of the rings separately engaged with the shoe and free to rotate between opposing positions abutting the exterior surface of the shoe on opposite sides of the ring. A frontal ring is centered on the instep and, when rotated to a medial rotational attitude, is aligned vertically and with a longitudinal axis of symmetry of the shoe. An inside ring, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude is aligned horizontally and centered relative to the height of the inside of the shoe. An outside ring, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude is aligned horizontally and centered relative to the height of the outside of the shoe. A rear ring is centered on the back of the shoe and, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude, is aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry.



Inventors:
Lampley, Deverick (Huntington Beach, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/136956
Publication Date:
11/30/2006
Filing Date:
05/24/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A43B5/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20100031537OUTSOLES FOR ESD TYPE PROTECTIVE FOOTWEAR AND METHODS OF MANUFACTURING THE SAMEFebruary, 2010Geisler
20060090369Insole with dravite bosses on top surfaceMay, 2006Sato
20030213146Sole with buffer elementsNovember, 2003Tien et al.
20080172908Snowshoes with cramponsJuly, 2008Tatsuno
20090307933REMOVABLE SPIKE FOR FOOTWEARDecember, 2009Leach
20080235986Shoe sole and insole structureOctober, 2008Guo
20090145003SINGLE-LAYERED ARCH SUPPORT INSOLE TO BE INSERTED INTO SHOEJune, 2009Kim
20050160628Method and article for sorting of protective coveringsJuly, 2005Feusner
20080078106Shoe for enhanced foot-to-ground tactile sensation and associated methodApril, 2008Montgomery
20060059712Hygienic sandalMarch, 2006Asham
20080098617Foot anti-contamination barrier membrane structureMay, 2008Garrett I



Primary Examiner:
MOHANDESI, JILA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PATENT LAW & VENTURE GROUP, PLLC (Las Vegas, NV, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for use with weighted cables and elastic cords in performing physical exercises, the apparatus comprising: a sport shoe having a toe, a back, an instep, a sole, an inside, an outside, a tongue, an exterior surface, and a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending between the heel and the toe medial to the inside and outside; a set of four rings each one of the rings separately engaged with the shoe in a manner wherein each said ring is free to rotate between opposing positions wherein, for each one of the rings, opposing sides of the ring abuts the exterior surface of the shoe, the ring alternately positionable in a medial rotational attitude between the opposing positions; the rings including a frontal ring centered on the instep and, when rotated to the medial rotational attitude, aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry; an inside ring, positioned such that when rotated to the medial rotational attitude, it is aligned horizontally and medially on the inside; an outside ring, positioned such that when rotated to the medial rotational attitude, it is aligned horizontally and medially on the outside; and a rear ring centered on the back and, when rotated to the medial rotational attitude, aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the rings are D-shaped, having a straight portion and are engaged with the exterior surface by anchor straps engaging the straight portion.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the anchor strap engaging the frontal ring is attached to the tongue of the shoe.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the shoe is a cross-trainer type shoe.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a lace engaging the shoe for tightening the shoe about a foot.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a flexible elongate attachment engaging at least one of the rings of the shoe, the attachment providing a resistance to movement.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the attachment is coupled to the frontal ring for performing at least one of: standing back kick exercises, seated leg curl exercises, lying straight leg heel drive exercises, standing leg curl exercises, kneeling donkey kick exercises, and lying butt kick exercises.

8. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the attachment is coupled to the inside ring for performing at least one of: seated leg/heel sweep exercises; standing outer thigh kick exercises, side lying glute kick exercises, side lying knee to chest pull exercises, and seated knee-to-chest exercises.

9. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the attachment is coupled to the outside ring for performing at least one of: lying knee drive exercises; standing inner thigh pull exercises, and seated leg cross straight leg exercises

10. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein the attachment is coupled to the rear ring for performing at least one of: lying leg kick exercises; seated leg extension exercises; standing knee lift/pull exercises; seated leg extension and leg press exercises, and standing knee kick exercises.

Description:

BACKGROUND

1. Related Applications: none

2. Field of the Present Disclosure

This disclosure relates generally to physical training equipment and gear and to the use of such equipment and gear especially for resistance training.

3. Description of Related Art

Physical fitness programs are widely used to develop more muscle mass, improve cardiovascular performance (aerobic conditioning), develop endurance, or otherwise improve physical and emotional well being. Workout equipment is typically designed for isolating selected muscle groups to achieve effective results. Theoretically, equipment is able to provide strength and muscle tone if a given exercise is done with the appropriate amount of weight and with sufficient repetitions. However, commercial workout equipment often fails to yield desired results because it is incapable of producing the necessary resistance vectors (magnitude and direction) for a given individual. It has been found that the most effective way to isolate a body part is through the use of cables. When a cable is properly “hooked up” to a desired body part, the user is able to get a consistent level of resistance force applied in the optimal direction through the entire repetition of a given exercise or movement.

The most frequent problem associated with a cable workout, is how to connect a cable to a target body part that is to be worked without producing pain. This is poorly understood in the fitness industry. Improper attachment or poorly fitting equipment often results in injury. The prior art, described below, underscores the fact that current know-how and technique in the use of cables is widely misunderstood and improperly applied.

Marshman, U.S. Pat. No. 2,097,376, discloses a harness with an adjustable waist girdle, a chest strap, adjustable strap connections between the girdle and the chest strap, shoulder straps connected with the chest strap, footwear having toe and heel coverage, elastic members separably engaged fore and aft with the footwear and the girdle, means on the footwear for relieving direct strain on their toe and heel coverage and hand operable elastic members engageable with the chest strap.

Brandano, U.S. Pat. No. 2,835,249, discloses a restraining device for a baby for use in combination with a baby's shoe comprising a plate and shoe having a heel, the plate having a plurality of apertures therethrough, shoe nails extending through the apertures fastening the plate to the heel of the shoe, an eye member attached to the plate, a strap, and a snap fastener secured to one end of the strap detachable securing the strap to the eye member, the eye member extending outwardly beyond the shoe, the eye member being integrally formed with the plate and extending angularly upwardly with respect to the plate.

Perez, U.S. Pat. No. 2,760,774, discloses a foot exerciser comprising a plate, a pair of heel positioning members adjustably disposed immediately upon said plate in a fixed position respecting the plane of the plate and respecting each other, a pair of separate toe-receiving members, and resilient means fixed to the respective toe-receiving members to resist movement of the toe-receiving members toward one another, in combination with means for adjusting the distance between each toe-receiving member and each heel-positioning member, the means comprising a slide ring fixed in the plate behind substantially the center of each of the heel-positioning members, and a pair of tapes oppositely attached to each of the two-receiving members at the end thereof into which the toes are inserted, the tapes being of sufficient length to pass through the nearest of the slide rings and thence to extend and be tied around the ankles of the user to hold the respective toe-receiving adjustable members upon the feet.

Roberts, U.S. Pat. No. 459,687, discloses an invention that comprises flexible handles which are adjustable in length, and which are attached to athletic shoes. The handles may be attached at various points on each shoe, adjusted to the desired length, and the wearer can grasp the handles to aid and augment exercises, and muscle toning routines.

Rosen, U.S. Pat. No. 5,094,231, discloses an orthopedic device for securement to the shoes of a patient to be treated to limit the relative angulation between the shoes, and to limit the relative spacing between the shoes while permitting some up and down movement of the feet. The device is formed with an elongate connecting member, with securing elements, one at each end thereof, with at least one of the securing elements being selectively detachable. Anchoring elements are provided on said shoes for pivotal engagement by said securing elements, with the anchoring elements adapted for affixation to the shoes of a patient. The anchoring elements and securing elements are pivotally interengaged, with a combined length less than the length of the shortest of the connected shoes, whereby the connected shoes may be moved up and down and at an angle to each other, while limiting the relative spacing between the shoes, and the possible range of movement of the shoes from a position substantially parallel to each other to one in which the feet of the patient have been rotated from a substantially parallel position.

Porter et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,100,129, discloses a home self-exercising device for strengthening the muscles, tendons and ligaments of the foot, ankle and lower leg, especially the forward lower leg muscles. The foot harness is adjusted to grasp the heel and forward foot of the patient. An elastic tension member is secured to the harness in the vicinity of the ball of the foot, and the other end is secured to an article of furniture or the like. The foot may then be moved against the force of the elastic member in the upward direction and rotated about the ankle. The difficulty of exercising the front lower leg muscles without the aid of another person is overcome by this device.

Rosen, U.S. Pat. No. 5,215,518, discloses an orthopedic device for securement to the shoes of a patient to be treated to limit the relative angulation and spacing between the shoes while permitting some up and down movement of the feet of a wearer. The device is formed with an elongate connecting member, with selectively detachable securing elements, one at each end thereof. One of the securing elements is formed as a hook with a spring pressed dog extending from the connecting member to engage the free end of the hook. Another of the securing elements is formed as a strap, one end of which is secured to the connecting member and the other end adjustably engaged with the connecting member. Anchoring elements are provided on said shoes for pivotal engagement by said securing elements, with the anchoring elements adapted for affixation to the shoes of a patient. The anchoring elements and securing elements are pivotally interengaged, with a combined length less than the length of the shortest of the connected shoes, whereby the connected shoes may be moved up and down at an angle to each other, while limiting the relative spacing between the shoes, and the possible range of movement of the shoes from a position substantially parallel to each other to one in which the feet of the patient have been rotated from a substantially parallel position.

Rodibaugh, U.S. Pat. No. 5,224,913, discloses an improved exercising device for developing various parts of the user's body that can also be used in walking, jogging, and running. The Spring Exerciser comprises of a coil extension spring connected to locking clamps. These clamps can be attached to shoes for walking, running, exercising, or rehabilitation. They can also be attached to flexible straps which can be used in arm pulls or arm and leg exercises.

Bobich, U.S. Pat. No. 5,263,916, discloses an exercise and physical therapy device having a central elongated resilient element with a wrist attachment strap at one end and a foot attachment strap at the other end. The device is configured so that the foot strap fits comfortably inside the user's shoe, allowing the device to be used simultaneously while performing walking, running, or other exercises.

Bobich, U.S. Pat. No. 5,545,113, discloses an exercise and physical therapy device having an adjustable length elongated resilient element with a wrist attachment strap at one end and a shoe attachment clip at the other end. The device is configured so that the shoe clip attaches to either the shoelace or an eyelet of the user's shoe, allowing the device to be used simultaneously while performing walking, running, or other exercises.

Ahmed Fahmey El-Circy, U.S. Pat. No. 5,713,142, discloses a training shoe that includes an anchorage device adapted securely to receive one or more elastic cords against which a wearer may exert him or herself. Preferably, the anchorage device includes a hole extending transversely through the sole of the shoe and through which hole one or more elastic cords are threaded so as to form an elastic loop which may be pulled by the wearer as part of an exercise regime.

Cowans et al., U.S. Pat. No. 6,206,807, discloses an ankle exercise device having a lower leg section receiving a calf portion of a lower leg of a user and a foot section receiving a foot of the user. The lower leg section is rotatably connected near the heel end of the foot section. A rigid control rod has one end connectable to the foot section and an opposite end held by the user. Thus, as the user successively pushes and pulls the control rod, the foot section is pivoted with respect to the lower leg section, thereby exercising the ankle-foot complex.

Singh, U.S. Pat. No. 6,224,524, discloses a shoe, preferably an athletic shoe, with an attachment designed to give people who have just begun an exercise program, and have not yet achieved sufficient flexibility to be able to comfortably touch their toes, something to grab onto that is attached to the toes of their shoes. The attachment consists of two side members that go on each side of the shoe from the toe to the opening for the leg, and a front piece and several cross-pieces connecting the side members, like rungs on a ladder. The side members, front piece and cross-pieces can be sewn together, or cut from one piece of material. The front piece is sewn to the toe of the shoe or otherwise permanently attached. A person using the invention may begin by reaching the cross-piece furthest from the toe, and work his or her way downward, one rung at a time, until they are able to touch their toes. The side members may be removably attached to the shoe by strips of hook and loop fasteners, when the attachment is not in use. The attachment may also be secured against the shoe by a strap passing over it. The strap is permanently attached to one side of the shoe, and removably attached to the other side of the shoe by hook and loop fasteners. The attachment should be made of a strong, but flexible material, that will not absorb moisture (such as perspiration caused by exercise).

Our prior art search with abstracts described above teaches elastic cords attached to an athletic shoe as for instance in Marshman U.S. Pat. No. 2,097,376, described above. However, the present apparatus distinguishes over Marshman in that the frontal and back attachment rings are oriented vertically while Marshman teaches a horizontal orientation. The instant ring orientation has been found to perform in a critically improved manner in that for side loads the ring rotates to abut the shoe surface providing lower torque forces on the shoe and foot. This helps to prevent injury to the angle. Roberts U.S. Pat. No. 4,596,387 also teaches a plurality of attachment rings on a sport shoe. However, Roberts fails to teach an instep ring and fails to teach rings that can rotate. The present disclosure distinguishes over the prior art providing heretofore unknown advantages as described in the following summary.

SUMMARY

This disclosure teaches certain benefits in construction and use which give rise to the objectives described below.

The present apparatus is a sports shoe that is scientifically designed to interface effectively with gym equipment based on resistance workout provided by the use of cables instead of free weights. This shoe allows the user to use cables without the discomfort of straps or other anchoring devices normally associated with the attachment of cables to a body part that is being isolated for effective workout.

The present apparatus provides distinct advantages over prior art methods of cable workouts. The apparatus consists of a shoe that provides comfort and total support for the foot and subsequently the upper body. It is uniquely equipped with four rings scientifically positioned on the shoe so as to provide easy and effective connection to cables attached to gym equipment designed to provide resistance during workout. Ring placement is designed to give the user the choice of which body part to work including, the inner thigh, outer thigh, hamstrings, and gluteus. Placement of the rings assures proper alignment of the resisting weight and the desired body part. This advantage greatly reduces the risk of injury in workout sessions.

The shoe's rings are designed to avoid any type of slippage commonly associated with cable/body connections. There is no uncomfortable strapping around the foot or ankle to cause the user to work in jerky, protective movements instead of the desired smooth consistent extension or retraction of the cables. This allows consistent resistance through the entire range of the movement of the exercise. This consistent movement minimizes the possibility of injury to joints, ligaments, tendons, and muscles that is commonly associated with jerky, uneven movements. The shoe is particularly useful and effective for exercises associated with rehabilitation of injuries. It provides the reassurance of safety to the user who is performing weight resistance training to rehabilitate damaged muscles. Using resistance in a full range of motions speeds the healing process.

The shoe can be worn as part of the user's street attire. It is comfortable and provides considerable support and can be worn for normal activities which means it does not need to be reserved only for workout sessions. Preferably, the shoe is a cross trainer which makes it interchangeable for many activities such as walking, running, weight lifting, basketball, tennis or any activity normally requiring athletic shoes.

Each of the four rings can support up to 50 pounds of weight. This is enabled by double stitching in each of the anchor straps that attaches the individual rings to the outer surface of the shoe.

The outside, side hook is used for motion directed toward the body. The inside, side hook is used for motions directed away from the body. The front or anterior hook is used to perform motions that are pushing in nature whether seated, kneeling, or standing. The rear or posterior hook is used to perform pulling motions. These four sets of hooks, inside, outside, front, and back are the key to achieving a greater balance to muscle development and strength across the entire body. Using resistance bearing cables develops leg strength, improves balance, improves jumping ability, and enhances fast twitch muscle reaction. Improved flexibility reduces the risk of injury.

The presently described and illustrated apparatus is a sport shoe providing a set of four rings each one of the rings separately engaged with the shoe and free to rotate between opposing positions abutting the exterior surface of the shoe on opposite sides of the ring. A frontal ring is centered on the instep and, when rotated to a medial rotational attitude, is aligned vertically and with a longitudinal axis of symmetry of the shoe. An inside ring, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude is aligned horizontally and centered relative to the height of the inside of the shoe. An outside ring, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude is aligned horizontally and centered relative to the height of the outside of the shoe. A rear ring is centered on the back of the shoe and, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude, is aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry. The ability of the rings to rotate into contact with the shoe surface is of critical importance in certain exercises where force moments should be minimized to help prevent ankle and foot injury.

A primary objective inherent in the above described apparatus and method of use is to provide advantages not taught by the prior art.

Another objective is provide a sport shoe with attachment rings that rotate to bring moment arms of lateral forces on the foot and ankle into tangential juxtaposition.

A further objective is to provide such a shoe with attachment rings located at positions optimal for applying forces to the foot without injury.

A still further objective is to provide such a shoe with attachment rings located for correct application of workout resistance forces for every muscle group in the lower half of the body and through extension, the upper half of the body.

Other features and advantages of the described apparatus and method of use will become apparent from the following more detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, the principles of the presently described apparatus and method of its use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings illustrate at least one of the best mode embodiments of the present apparatus and method of it use. In such drawings the apparatus is shown in:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the present apparatus;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view thereof;

FIGS. 3A through 17B are views showing the method of use of the apparatus including:

FIGS. 3A and 3B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a standing back kick exercise;

FIGS. 4A and 4B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a seated leg curl exercise;

FIGS. 5A and 5B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a lying straight leg heel drive exercise;

FIGS. 6A and 6B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a lying butt kick exercise;

FIGS. 7A and 7B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a seated leg/heel sweep exercise;

FIG. 8A is a plan view, and FIG. 8B is a side elevational view showing the apparatus used in a seated knees-to-chest exercise;

FIGS. 9A and 9B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a lying knee drive exercise;

FIGS. 10A and 10B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a seated leg cross straight leg exercise;

FIGS. 11A and 11B are plan views showing the apparatus used in a lying leg kick exercise;

FIGS. 12A and 12B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a standing knee lift exercise;

FIGS. 13A and 13B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a seated leg extension exercise;

FIGS. 14A and 14B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a standing leg curl exercise;

FIGS. 15A and 15B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a standing knee lift/pull exercise;

FIGS. 16A and 16B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a kneeling donkey kick exercise; and

FIGS. 17A and 17B are elevational views showing the apparatus used in a standing outer thigh kick exercise, the inner thigh kick being similar but using the inside leg.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The above described drawing figures illustrate the described apparatus and its method of use in at least one of its preferred, best mode embodiment, which is further defined in detail in the following description. Those having ordinary skill in the art may be able to make alterations and modifications what is described herein without departing from its spirit and scope. Therefore, it must be understood that what is illustrated is set forth only for the purposes of example and that it should not be taken as a limitation in the scope of the present apparatus and method of use.

The presently described and illustrated apparatus is used with weighted cables and elastic cords in performing physical exercises as shown in FIGS. 3A to 17B. The apparatus includes a sport shoe 20, preferably of the cross-trainer type, having a toe 22, a back 24, an instep 26, a sole 28, an inside 30, referring now to that portion of the shoe 20 that covers the inside of the foot, an outside 32, referring now to that portion of the shoe 20 that covers the outside of the foot, a tongue 34, an exterior surface 36, and a longitudinal axis of symmetry 38 extending between the back 24 and the toe 22, medial to the inside 30 and outside 32 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. A set of four rings are separately engaged with the shoe 20 in a manner wherein each ring is free to rotate between opposing positions wherein, for each one of the rings, opposing sides “A” and “B” (FIG. 2) abut the exterior surface 36. Each ring is positionable in its medial rotational attitude between the opposing positions. The rings include a frontal ring 40 centered on the instep 26 and, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude, it is aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry 38. An inside ring 42, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude, as shown in FIG. 2, is aligned horizontally and medially relative to the height of the inside 30. An outside ring 44, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude, is aligned horizontally and medially relative to the height of the outside 32. Finally, a rear ring 46 is centered on the back 24 and, when rotated to its medial rotational attitude (FIG. 2), is aligned vertically and with the longitudinal axis of symmetry 38.

The rings are preferably D-shaped, having a straight portion 5 and are engaged with the exterior surface 36 by anchor straps 50 securing the straight portion 5 of the rings. The straps 50 are preferably doubly stitched to shoe 20, as shown, for improved securement. Preferably the anchor strap 50 engaging the frontal ring 40 is attached to the tongue 34 of the shoe 20 and the shoe 20 preferably is secured on a foot using lace engagement 60 which also secure the tongue 34.

The apparatus further comprises a flexible elongate attachment 70, preferably a steel cable engaging at least one of the rings of the shoe 20, the attachment 70 providing a resistance to movement by attachment to a weight lifting device as is well known in the art, or by use of an elastic cord.

The attachment 70 may be coupled to the frontal ring 40 for performing exercises such as standing back kick exercises, seated leg curl exercises, lying straight leg heel drive exercises, standing leg curl exercises, kneeling donkey kick exercises, and lying butt kick exercises as are shown in the figures.

The attachment 70 is coupled to the inside ring 42 for performing exercises such as seated leg/heel sweep exercises; standing outer thigh kick exercises, side lying glute kick exercises, side lying knee to chest pull exercises, and seated knee-to-chest exercises as are shown in the figures.

The attachment 70 is coupled to the outside ring 44 for performing exercises such as lying knee drive exercises, standing inner thigh pull exercises, and seated leg cross straight leg exercises as are shown in the figures.

The attachment 70 is coupled to the rear ring 46 for performing exercises such as lying leg kick exercises; seated leg extension exercises; standing knee lift/pull exercises; seated leg extension and leg press exercises, and standing knee kick exercises as are shown in the figures.

The enablements described in detail above are considered novel over the prior art of record and are considered critical to the operation of at least one aspect of the apparatus and its method of use and to the achievement of the above described objectives. The words used in this specification to describe the instant embodiments are to be understood not only in the sense of their commonly defined meanings, but to include by special definition in this specification: structure, material or acts beyond the scope of the commonly defined meanings. Thus if an element can be understood in the context of this specification as including more than one meaning, then its use must be understood as being generic to all possible meanings supported by the specification and by the word or words describing the element.

The definitions of the words or drawing elements described herein are meant to include not only the combination of elements which are literally set forth, but all equivalent structure, material or acts for performing substantially the same function in substantially the same way to obtain substantially the same result. In this sense it is therefore contemplated that an equivalent substitution of two or more elements may be made for any one of the elements described and its various embodiments or that a single element may be substituted for two or more elements in a claim.

Changes from the claimed subject matter as viewed by a person with ordinary skill in the art, now known or later devised, are expressly contemplated as being equivalents within the scope intended and its various embodiments. Therefore, obvious substitutions now or later known to one with ordinary skill in the art are defined to be within the scope of the defined elements. This disclosure is thus meant to be understood to include what is specifically illustrated and described above, what is conceptually equivalent, what can be obviously substituted, and also what incorporates the essential ideas.

The scope of this description is to be interpreted only in conjunction with the appended claims and it is made clear, here, that each named inventor believes that the claimed subject matter is what is intended to be patented.