Title:
Novel smoking composition
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention provides a novel smoking composition for hookah. Various flavours both natural and synthetic are added to improve the quality of smoke and impart good smell. A method of making the smoking composition is also disclosed.



Inventors:
Fazlani, Arif Abdul Kader (Nariman Point, IN)
Application Number:
11/268286
Publication Date:
11/16/2006
Filing Date:
11/03/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A24B15/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SZEWCZYK, CYNTHIA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Charles Muserlain (Valley Cottage, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A smoking composition for hookah containing an intimate mixture having moisture content ranging from 15% to 30% and a brix content of 45-65%. i) cleaned, sterilized, sieved tobacco fibres with or without addition of cellulosic fibres of length ranging from 4-40 mm; ii) at least one humectant selected from a first group of humectants containing glycerine and sorbitol; iii) at least one humectant selected from a second group of humectants consisting of propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, polydextrose, mannitol and triacetin; iv) at least one saccharide solution from a group of saccharides comprising Sugar, molasses, malt syrup, corn syrup, Honey, glucose, dextrose and stevia; v) at least one preservatives selected from a group of preservatives consisting of sodium benzoate, Propionic acid, sulphur dioxide and Sorbic acid; vi) at least one flavour selected from a group of flavours consisting of natural flavours comprising apple flavour, aniseed flavour, mint flavour, peppermint flavour, strawberry flavour, spearmint flavour, clove flavour, cardamom flavour, cinnamon flavour, mixed fruit flavour, peach flavour, pineapple flavour, banana flavour, mango flavour; raspberry flavour, melon flavour, orange flavour, lime flavour, grape flavour tobacco flavour, ginger flavour, licorice flavour and chocolate flavour and a group of synthetic flavourants consisting of Citric acid, Fumaric acid, Ascorbic acid, Tartaric acid and Lactic acid; vii) a flavour enhancer; and viii) at least one colouring agent selected from a group of colouring agents consisting of red, reddish brown, brownish red, blackish brown;

2. A smoking composition as claimed in claim 1, having i) 10-85% of total mass of composition comprising tobacco fibres; ii) 0-15% of cellulosic material other than tobacco; iii) 2-25% of the first humectant; iv) 0.10-12% of the second humectant; v) 12-65% of the saccharide vi) 0.07-0.8 % of preservatives; vii) 0.8-13% of natural flavours; viii) 0.8-0.7% of synthetic flavours; and ix) 1-12% of vanilla powder as flavour enhancer;

3. A smoking composition as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cellulosic material other than tobacco is selected from a group of cellulosic materials consisting of bagasse, wheat chaff, corn stalks, drum sticks or a combination of any of the materials.

4. A method of manufacturing the smoking composition as claimed in claim 1, comprising the steps of; i) cleaning, sieving the tobacco with or without other cellulosic material; ii) chopping the cleansed the tobacco with or without other cellulosic material to obtain a chopped fibre matrix of length of 4 to 40 mm; iii) preparing a lightly caramelized aqueous solution of a dispensed quantity of saccharide in boiling water, adding a flavouring agent to the saccharide solution, adding the cooled flavour containing saccharide solution to the matrix and mixing gently; iv) allowing the saccharide containg matrix to react for a period of at least 24 hours; v) adding a preservative to the saccharide matrix; vi) adding a humectant and colouring agent to the preservative containing saccharide matrix and gently mixing; vii) allowing the mixture produced in step-vi to mature for at least 10 days with gentle mixing intermittently throughout the period to obtain a mature mixture; viii) adding a further quantity of saccharide together with dispensed quantity of flavours to the matured mixture to obtain a flavoured mature mixture; ix) adding a flavour enhancer dissolved in a humectant to the flavoured mature mixture; x) allowing the flavoured mature mixture with flavour enhancer to mature for a further period of atleast 36 hours; xi) adding a humectant to the mixture produced at the end of step-x and allowing the additional humectant containing flavour enhanced mixture to mature for a further period of 15 days; xii) adjusting the moisture and brix content of the final composition to obtain a smoking composition in which the moisture content ranges from 15-30% and the brix content ranges from 45-65%; xiii) packing the smoking composition in air tight pouches for further use.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention relates to a novel smoking composition.

This invention particularly relates to a smoking composition for use with a smoking device called a ‘Hookah’.

Still particularly, what is envisaged in accordance with this invention is a flavoured smoking composition

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention is particularly related the use of a smoking composition for use with a smoking device called ‘Hookah’.

Hookah is, also known as the narghile, water pipe and hubby-bubbly. Hookahs were first used five centuries ago in India and they are a device still employed today—though not very commonly.

‘Hookah’ is a device which permits the smoking but reduces the harmful effects by means of eliminating excess nicotine by passing the smoke through water.

The Hookah consists of several sections; the pipe, the head, the body, the hose, and the mouthpiece.

The pipe, is outside the ‘Hookah’ located at its highest point. The head is a piece between the pipe and the body. It is made of hard materials in order for it to be resilient. The upper portion is shaped so as to hold the pipe, and this part was decorated with carvings. The head is generally made of brass, copper, or bronze. Very special ones are made of silver. Near the point where these are connected to the body, there is a nipple-like protrusion onto which the hose is attached.

The bottle, or body, most often is in the form of a pitcher with a narrow neck and broad belly. The bottle contains water, and there is a thin hose descending from the pipe. Because of this hose, the smoke coming in is cleaned somewhat in the water and at least some of the nicotine from the tobacco is eliminated. The hose is a flexible tube capable of being bent every which way and is attached to the nipple-like protrusion on the upper portion of the head connected to the body. This serves to conduct the smoke cleansed in the bottle to the mouth.

Hookah's are used as follows. First the tobacco is set in the pipe and a bit of lit charcoal is placed on top of it. When the mouthpiece at the end of the hose is placed in the mouth and inhaled upon, the air in the space at the top of the bottle passes through the pipe with the smoke and enters the water through the tube attached to it which extends into the water. Cleansed by the water, the smoke collects in the empty space at the top of the bottle and when the ‘Hookah’ hose is sucked upon, the smoke washed and somewhat purified of its nicotine enters the mouth.

Currently the tobacco used in ‘Hookah’ is the conventional tobacco dust and leaves mixture. This conventional tobacco has the same limitations as for conventional tobacco used in cigarettes and cigars or pipe tobacco.

The smoke generated by the hookah has a particularly acrid smell which is obnoxious to the non-smoker and a beginner smoker. It is also desirable to have a stable smoking composition with a more pleasant flavour and smell.

This invention relates to a flavoured and pleasant smoking composition for hookah.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a flavoured smoking material for use in a ‘hookah’ which yields a smoke having a substantially lower amount of undesirable components than tobacco smoke, while at the same time having an acceptable taste and smouldering rate.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a smoking composition for ‘hookah’ containing a natural smoking material base exhibiting the aforesaid properties.

Another object is to provide an alternative, natural, healthy material adapted for incorporation in a smoking composition which suppresses the natural strong smell of tobacco and imparts a light vibrant fruity flavour and smell.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a smoking composition for a ‘hookah’ which during use has a pleasant smell.

The present invention relates to a mixture of tobacco and other products that can be used as a pleasant substitute for tobacco.

The present invention provides both an improved flavoured smoking material and a novel method for its preparation.

A principal feature of this invention is the smoking composition for hookah having a good smouldering rate, pleasant taste, good aroma and all round satisfying smoking characteristics. The end result is the production of a smoking material having acceptable burning and smoke characteristics.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The principle feature of this invention is the smoking composition having a plurality of flavours and colours. These flavours have to be added at critical stages in the process of manufacture of the composition and in critical quantities to ensure that the flavours remain till the end of the shelf life of the product.

It is a main object of this invention to provide novel smoking preparations, which deliver smoke of reduced acrid smell and pleasant flavour under normal smoking conditions.

In general, it has been discovered that a composition comprising an intimate mixture of tobacco, saccharides of the type herein below defined and particular filler in amounts specified herein fulfils the aforesaid requirements.

A] Flavored ‘Hookah’ with sugar-
a) Base matter- Tobacco with or without cellulosic15-82%
material
b)Saccharide solution - Sugar/molasses/malt syrup/12-65%
corn syrup/Honey
c) Humectant-(1) - Glycerine/Sorbitol, 2-25%
d) Humectant-(2) - Propylene glycol, Polydextrose,0.10-12.% 
ethylene glycol, Mannitol, Triacetin.-
e) Flavour(1) - Ctric acid, Fumaric acid, Ascorbic acid,−0.08-7.0%
Tartaric acid, Lactic acid
f) Preservatives - Sodium benzoate, Propionic acid,−0.08-0.7%
Sorbic acid, Sulphur dioxide
g) Flavour enhancer - Vanilla powder−0.09-6.0%
h) Colouring agent - Red, Reddish brown, Brownish red,−0.05-4%  
Blackish brown
i) Flavour(2) - Apple, Aniseed, Strawberry, Mixed fruit,−0.8-13%  
Chocolate, tobacco,
synthetic flavours such as menthol.
    • custom character Potassium nitrate (KNO3)
      KNO3 is used in an aqueous solution to treat leaves to augment flagration of the end product so that it is made useable for hookah smoking purposes.)
    • custom character Colourant—Colour is added to give the product an attractive colour.
    • custom character Humectants are substance having hydrophilic properties and a stabilizing effect on the water content in a material, maintaining water content in a narrow range regardless of humidity fluctuations. They prevent the drying of the exposed end of the cigarettes.

The most preferred embodiments for making a 100 Kg bagasse based smoking composition.

Tobacco14-50 Kg(16.57)
Additional cellulosic material0-15 kg
Saccharide solution30-62 Kg(55.91)
Glycerine10-37 Kg(21)
Propylene glycol2-0.17 Kg(0.9 kg)
Citric acid0.15-0.70 Kg(0.17 kg)
Sodium benzoate0.08-3 Kg(0.09 kg)
Vanilla powder0.08-0.23 Kg(0.09 kg)
Colour0.08-1.10 Kg(0.05 kg)
Flavour0.88-8 Kg(5.22 kg)
Potassium nitrate0.15-0.20 Kg(150 gm)

Method of Manufacture of Smoking Composition:

The tobacco with or without other cellulosic material, (bagasse/cellulose fibres/drumsticks/Corn stalks/wheat chaff) are cleaned and sterilized by manual and steam treatment and objectionable foreign particulate matter are removed.

1) The tobacco and with or without other cellulosic material (14-50 Kg) after the initial treatment is cut to a length of 4 to 40 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums are washed throughly with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the cellulosic material is once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust.

4) A measured volume of water (12.52 -45 kg) is taken and boiled in which a weighed quantity of saccharide (18-65 Kg) is added. This is then mixed well (The saccharide solution is prepared in excess). The total volume weighs 30.52-110 Kg.

5) The saccharide solution is heated (60-80 degrees Celsius) and when it starts turning light brown, weighed quantity (0.15-0.70 Kg) of flavouring agent such as citric acid is added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution is cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 is mixed with a weighed quantity of tobacco and with or without other cellulosic material (14-50 Kg) in a machine. This mixture is allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours a weighed quantity of a preservative such as sodium benzoate (0.1-3 Kg ) is added to it and mixed well.

9) Weighed quantities of humectant such as glycerine (10-37 Kg) and colour (0.08-1.10) are taken and mixed together and this mixture is added to the tobacco and with or without other cellulosic material of step-8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture is allowed to remain as such for 10-15 days where it is mixed thoroughly every day. This is to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, measured volume of water (12.52-45 kg) is boiled and measured weight of saccharide (18-65 Kg) is added to it. A portion of the solution (approximately one fourth) is mixed with tobacco and with or without other cellulosic material of step-9.

11) A weighed quantity of the flavour (0.88-8 Kg) is added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10. (Different flavors natural and synthetic can be added to suit the tastes of the smoker.)

12) A measured quantity humectant such as Propylene glycol (2-0.17) is heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This is followed by the addition of a measured quantity of vanilla powder (0.1-0.23), used as flavour enhancer, which is dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This is then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture is then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) Whenever a Hookah order is to be packaged, the mixture is mixed with glycerine (humectant) (8.84-31.5 Kg). This final mixture is packed in drums and is allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product ranges from 15 to 30% with a brix value (Concentration of sugars) ranging from 45 to 65%.

The composition is then packed in airtight pouches for use as and when required.

EXAMPLES

Example 1

1) The tobacco was cleaned with steam and sieved to remove dust particles. The typical process included cleaning and sterilizing the tobacco, i.e. by manual and steam treatment.

14.2 Kg of tobacco after the initial treatment was cut to a length of 20 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums were washed compulsorily with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the tobacco was once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust.

4) 21 Kg of water was taken and boiled in which 30 Kg of cane sugar was added. This was then mixed well (The solution was prepared in excess). The total volume weighed 51 Kg.

5) The sugar solution was heated to 60 degrees Celsius and when it started turning light brown, 0.149 Kg of citric acid (flavouring agent) was added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution was cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 was mixed with 14.2 Kg of tobacco in a machine. This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours 0.10 Kg sodium benzoate (preservative) was added to it and mixed well.

9) 18.50 Kg of glycerine (humectant) and 0.08 Kg of red colour were taken and mixed together. This mixture was added to the tobacco of step -8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 12 days and it was mixed thoroughly every day. This was to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, 21 Kg of water was boiled and 30 Kg of cane sugar was added to it. 12.0 Kg of the solution was mixed with the tobacco of step-9.

11) 3.76 Kg of Apple flavour was added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10.

12) 0.60Kg of Propylene glycol was heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This was followed by the addition of 0.10 Kg of vanilla powder (used as flavour enhancer), which was dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This was then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture was then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) When the Hookah order was to be packaged, the mixture was mixed with 8.42 Kg of glycerine. This final mixture was packed in drums and was allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product was 20% and the brix value was 50%

The composition was then packed in airtight pouches for use.

Example 2

1) The tobacco on arrival were cleaned with steam and sieved to remove dust particles. The typical process included cleaning and sterilizing the tobacco, both by manual and steam treatment.

13.10 kgs of Cellulosic fibre, comprising of

Bagasse—10 kg, was added so that the total tobacco plus fibre mixture was 23.10 kg.

After the initial treatment they were cut to a length of 30 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums were washed compulsorily with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the tobacco-Cellulosic fibre mixture were once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust. Final tobacco-Cellulosic fibre mixture was 23 kg.

4) 15 Kg of water was taken and boiled in which 23 Kg of molasses was added. This was then mixed well (The solution was prepared in excess). The total volume weighed 38 Kg.

5) The molasses solution was heated to 60 degrees Celsius and when it started turning light brown, 0.243 Kg of ascorbic acid (flavouring agent) was added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution was cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 was mixed with 23.10 Kg of tobacco-Cellulosic fibre mixture. This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours 0.65 Kg propionic acid (preservative) was added to it and mixed well.

9) 25 Kg of sorbitol (humectant) and 0.26 Kg of brownish red colour were taken and mixed together. This mixture was added to the tobacco-Cellulosic fibre mixture of step -8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 13 days and it was mixed thoroughly every day. This was to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, 15 Kg of water was boiled and 23 Kg of molasses was added to it. 9.5 Kg of the solution was mixed with the bagasse of step-9.

11) 6.052 Kg of menthol flavour was added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10.

12) 0.17 Kg of polydextrose was heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This was followed by the addition of 0.17 Kg of vanilla powder (used as flavour enhancer), which was dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This was then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture was then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) When the Hookah order was to be packaged, the mixture was mixed with 14.5 Kg of sorbitol. This final mixture was packed in drums and was allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product was 15% and the brix value was 60%

The composition was then packed in airtight pouches for use.

Example 3

1) The tobacco materials on arrival were cleaned with steam and sieved to remove dust particles. The typical process included cleaning and sterilizing the tobacco material, both by manual and steam treatment.

49.10 kgs of tobacco after the initial treatment they were cut to a length of 40 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums were washed compulsorily with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the tobacco were once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust.

4) 10 Kg of water was taken and boiled in which 15 Kg of malt syrup was added. This was then mixed well (The solution was prepared in excess). The total volume weighed 25 Kg.

5) The malt syrup solution was heated to 70 degrees Celsius and when it started turning light brown, 0.515 Kg of fumaric acid (flavouring agent) was added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution was cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 was mixed with 49.10 Kg of tobacco in a machine. This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours 0.17 Kg sorbic acid (preservative) was added to it and mixed well.

9) 11.0 Kg of glycerine (humectant) and 0.65 Kg of brown colour were taken and mixed together. This mixture was added to the tobacco of step-8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 13 days and it was mixed thoroughly every day. This was to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, 10.0 Kg of water was boiled and 15 Kg of malt syrup was added to it. 6.25 Kg of the solution was mixed with the cellulosic fibre of step-9.

11) 12.92 Kg of aniseed flavour was added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10.

12) 0.26 Kg of ethylene glycol was heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This was followed by the addition of 0.17 Kg of vanilla powder (used as flavour enhancer), which was dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This was then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture was then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) When the Hookah order was to be packaged, the mixture was mixed with 11 Kg of glycerine. This fmal mixture was packed in drums and was allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product was 30% and the brix value was 40%

The composition was then packed in airtight pouches for use.

Example 4

1) The cellulosic materials on arrival were cleaned with steam and sieved to remove dust particles. The typical process included cleaning and sterilizing the cellulosic material, both by manual and steam treatment.

5.0 kgs of tobacco after the initial treatment they were cut to a length of 25 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums were washed compulsorily with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the tobacco were once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust.

4) 17 Kg of water was taken and boiled in which 25 Kg of corn syrup was added. This was then mixed well (The solution was prepared in excess). The total volume weighed 42 Kg.

5) The corn syrup solution was heated to 75 degrees Celsius and when it started turning light brown, 0.480 Kg of tartaric acid (flavouring agent) was added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution was cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 was mixed with 5.0 Kg of tobacco in a machine. This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours 3.0 Kg sodium benzoate (preservative) was added to it and mixed well.

9) 36.0 Kg of sorbitol (humectant) and 1.10 Kg of reddish brown colour were taken and mixed together. This mixture was added to the tobacco of step-8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 13 days and it was mixed thoroughly every day. This was to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, 17.0 Kg of water was boiled and 25.0 Kg of corn syrup was added to it. 10.05 Kg of the solution was mixed with the cellulosic fibre of step-9.

11) 12.0 Kg of strawberry flavour was added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10.

12) 2 Kg of mannitol was heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This was followed by the addition of 1.02 Kg of vanilla powder (used as flavour enhancer), which was dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This was then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture was then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) When the Hookah order was to be packaged, the mixture was mixed with 28.42 Kg of sorbitol. This final mixture was packed in drums and was allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product was 15% and the brix value was 35%

The composition was then packed in airtight pouches for use.

Example 5

1) The tobacco on arrival were cleaned with steam and sieved to remove dust particles. The typical process included cleaning and sterilizing the tobacco and wheat chaff, both by manual and steam treatment.

6.0 kgs of Cellulosic fibre, comprising of

tobacco—4 kg

Wheat chaff—2 kg

After the initial treatment they were cut to a length of 35 mm in a cutting machine.

2) The drums were washed compulsorily with acetone to remove any flavour or smell associated with flavours from earlier processing.

3) Before processing, the tobacco-wheat chaff mixture were once again sieved to remove any remaining traces of dust.

4) 12.0 Kg of water was taken and boiled in which 18 Kg of honey was added. This was then mixed well (The solution was prepared in excess). The total volume weighed 30 Kg.

5) The honey was heated to 80 degrees Celsius and when it started turning light brown, 0.23 Kg of lactic acid (flavouring agent) was added and mixed with it with the help of a spoon stirrer.

6) The above solution was cooled and weighed.

7) The solution from step-6 was mixed with 6.0 Kg of tobacco-wheat chaff mixture in a machine. This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 24 hours.

8) After 24 hours 0.22 Kg propanoic acid (preservative) was added to it and mixed well.

9) 20.0 Kg of glycerine (humectant) and 0.73 Kg of blackish brown colour were taken and mixed together. This mixture was added to the tobacco-wheat chaff mixture of step -8 and mixed using a spoon stirrer.

This mixture was allowed to remain as such for 10 days and it was mixed thoroughly every day. This was to ensure that they do not settle at one place.

10) Next, 12.0 Kg of water was boiled and 18 Kg of malt syrup was added to it. 7.5 Kg of the solution was mixed with the cellulosic fibre of step-9.

11) 0.23 Kg of mixed fruit flavour was added to and mixed with the mixture of step-10.

12) 0.59 Kg of triacetin was heated indirectly by placing the container on boiling hot water. This was followed by the addition of 0.23 Kg of vanilla powder (used as flavour enhancer), which was dissolved thoroughly by stirring. This was then added to the mixture of step-10 and mixed. The mixture was then allowed to mature for 3 days.

13) When the Hookah order was to be packaged, the mixture was mixed with 3.75 Kg of glycerine. This final mixture was packed in drums and was allowed to mature for 15 days.

The moisture in the final product was 20% and the brix value was 45%

The composition was then packed in airtight pouches for use.

Trials:

The smoking compositions of eaxmples 1-15 were given to various batches of hookah smokers. Unanimously, all smokers were satisfied with the quality of the composition. In the process of smoking, the smoke generated had a pleasant fruity aroma unlike the smoke produced by the conventional smokers of smoking composition. The ash produced was also less smelly and there was over all on an average 10% less ash. Needless to say, inspite of having a satisfactory smoke, the smokers received less nicotine and less tar than they would otherwise receive by smoking conventional smoking compositions.

Uses of the Present Invention:

1) The invention provides a flavoured composition for use as a tobacco substitute for aiding in the cessation of tobacco use.

2) A primary advantage of the present invention is that it provides a means for people to reduce their addiction for nicotine at relatively low cost.

3) The present invention is to minimise the craving a person would normally experience when that person attempts to reduce their use of nicotine containing products or stop using such products altogether. At the same time the invention will strengthen the person's immune system allowing that person to stop smoking tobacco with very little effort.