Title:
Foundation rebar hangers
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A series of rebar hangers for use at both a secondary primary level and a secondary level, vertically speaking for the suspension of rebar rods in footing formation. These components employ a rest head connected to a shaft, connected to a base, which base if the device is of a primary level nature has a spacer disposed on the rear side thereof. Each of the heads is conceptually interchangeable as is each of the bases interchangeable to create a fixed configuration unit for a specific mount and retention. The device's rest head is attached to or overlays a footing former, if primary; or attaches to a primary device if secondary. The base extending from the shaft is adapted to retain one or two rebar rods depending on the base's configuration.



Inventors:
Zapata, Alvaro (Sacramento, CA, US)
Ahlgren, Allan (Carmichael, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/124017
Publication Date:
11/09/2006
Filing Date:
05/09/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/712
International Classes:
E04C5/00; E04B1/38
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
AHMAD, CHARISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Mark C. Jacobs (Sacramento, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A device for the retention of rebar rods for use in the construction of footings and the like, which device comprises: [a] a rest head to secure the device to a footing former; [b] an elongated shaft, a first end of which is connected to said rest head; and [c] a base for the retention of rebar rods in a generally horizontal position, said base being connected to the second end of said elongated shaft.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein the rest head is a nail rest head having an inverted J-shaped configuration.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein the rest head is an overlay rest head of a generally inverted U-shaped configuration.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein a spacer comprising a rearwardly disposed portion is attached to the base which spacer is adapted to rest against a surface to retain the device in a generally vertical disposition.

5. The device of claim 4 wherein the spacer is V-shaped, and is mounted at its midpoint to the base.

6. The device of claim 4 wherein the spacer is a straight spacer.

7. The device of claim 1 wherein the base is a combination base.

8. The device of claim 1 wherein the base is a hook base.

9. A device for the retention of rebar rods for use in the construction of footings and the like, which device comprises: [a] a rest head to secure the device to a footing former; [b] an elongated shaft, a first end of which is connected to said rest head; and [c] a base for the retention of rebar rods in a generally horizontal position, said base being connected to the second end of said elongated shaft wherein the rest head is a nail rest head having an inverted J-shaped configuration, and the base is a hook base and a Vee spacer is attached to the base.

10. The device of claim 9 wherein the base is a hook base having a distal leg, and a tail is extended laterally normal to the distal leg of said base.

11. The device of claim 9 wherein the hook base is replaced by a combination base of a hook and MJ configuration.

12. A device for the retention of rebar rods for use in the construction of footings and the like, which device comprises: [a] an overlay rest head of a generally inverted U-shape to secure the device to a footing former; [b] an elongated shaft, a first end of which is connected to said rest head; and [c] a base for the retention of rebar rods in a generally horizontal position, said base being connected to the second end of said elongated shaft, said base being a combination base of a hook and MJ configuration.

13. The device of claim 12, wherein a single S-spacer is attached to and reinforces the base.

14. The device of claim 3 wherein the base is a hook base and a Vee spacer is attached at its center to the base.

15. The device of claim 1 wherein the unit is adapted to serve as a secondary retainer and wherein the head is an inverted arcuate U having its distal leg normal to the orientation of the rest of the retainer, and wherein the base is of an offset W configuration.

16. The device of claim 1 wherein the unit is formed from a single piece of drawn wire.

17. The device of claim 1 wherein the unit is formed from several pieces of wire welded together.

18. The device of claim 1 wherein the device is made of plastic.

19. A combination of a primary and a secondary retainer for rebar rods, which combination comprises, a primary rebar retainer comprising a nail rest head and a combination base having a hook and MJ base, with a secondary retainer for holding rebar rods at a lower elevation than the primary rebar retainer, said secondary retainer having an inverted arcuate U-shaped rest head, and an offset W configured base.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention pertains to the field of building construction and more particularly, to the mounting of rebar steel rods for use in the preparation of foundations and footings for buildings constructed on a slab of concrete.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

All slab-based buildings, both residential and commercial, require rebar steel reinforcements in the perimeter footings under the U.B.C., IE, Uniform Building Code. These longitudinal pieces of steel, generally about one inch or so in diameter may be placed one in a single vertical plane, [total 1] or two in one horizontal plane, [total 2] or two horizontal and two vertical [total 4] but never differing numbers in parallel horizontal planes. Thus, one would never find a combination of two steel rods in a first horizontal plane and only one in a second horizontal plane for a total of rods. It would be either two or four as the engineer for the site had determined.

Today wire ties are used to secure the previously positioned rebar members to the footing forms to retain the rebar members in a uniform position relative to the wood or other material used for the concrete form for the entire length of the rebar which can be 10 ft., 20 ft. or any other length desired, as rebar is sold to the concrete foundation trade by weight not by length. While wire tires are fully operative to do the job of securing the rebar in position for the concrete pour operation, the use of them is labor intensive. Therefore any method that eliminates the use of the hand tying operation is to be deemed beneficial. The devices of this invention meet the desired needs of securing the rebar into the proper position for the concrete pour in considerably less time than it takes to hand tie a series of wire ties.

It is a first object therefore to provide a wire tie replacement for firmly positioning rebar steel in the building foundation business.

It is a second object to provide a lightweight lowcost alternative to the use of wire ties for securing rebar prior to the pouring of a foundation.

It is a third object to provide a series of devices each of which is intended for a particular number spaced from each other rebar steel members.

It is a fourth object to provide an easy to install system of rebar hangers for use in the construction of building foundations.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the device possessing the features properties and the relation of components which are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the appended claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference should be made to the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

GLOSSARY

For ease of understanding certain terms will be set forth with their intended meaning to be utilized in the reading of this application.

1. Nail rest head—top portion of a device according to the invention with an inverted J-shaped configuration. This head rests on a nail which may be angularly disposed in a footing's form wall.

2. Overlay rest head—top portion of a device having a head sized to rest upon the edge of a 2×10-inch board, or 2×12-inch board, along the 2-inch dimension.

3. Hook—a type of base of a device having an arcuate center between two parallel sides, a proximal side, and a distal side.

4. Tail—an extension from the parallel side of a hook base distant from the shaft.

5. Extension—a segment extending substantially normal to the distal parallel side of a hook base.

6. Shaft—the connection portion between the hook and the base of a unit according to this invention.

7. Vee spacer—a V-shaped rearwardly disposed portion that rests against an upright form, and acts as a spacer for the balance of the device and the rebar members in position thereon.

8. Straight spacer—a single straight rearwardly disposed portion that rests against an upright form, and acts as a spacer for the balance of the device and the rebar members in position thereon.

9. Combination base—a hook base used in conjunction with an additional shape to retain two spaced apart rebar rods.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of a nail rest head which forms a portion of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of an overlay rest head which forms a part of this invention.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a shaft that is disposed between a head and a base in the various embodiments of this invention.

FIG. 4 is plan view of a hook base which forms a part of this invention.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a hook base having a tail extension thereon which forms a part of a unit of this invention.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a Vee leg portion that forms a version of a spacer portion of certain embodiments of this invention.

FIG. 7 is a reinforced double base utilized in various embodiments of this invention.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a hook base with extension having a Vee leg thereon as this utilized in this invention.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of this invention as seen on its right side.

FIG. 10 is a left rear perspective view of the device shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a front perspective view of a variant of the device of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a rear perspective view of the device of FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is a right perspective view of a second embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 14 is a left perspective view thereof.

FIG. 15 is a front perspective view thereof.

FIG. 16 is a right plan view of a third embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 17 is a left perspective view of a fourth embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 18 is a left perspective view from a different vantage point of the device of FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is a top perspective view showing the utilization of an embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of the sixth embodiment which is a supplementary hanger having an offset W base.

FIG. 21 is a rear perspective view of a sixth embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 22 is a closeup view showing a portion the secondary hanger of FIG. 20.

FIG. 23 is a closeup in use view of the bottom area of a portion of the device of FIG. 20.

FIG. 24 is a top plan view showing the overlaying rest head device of this invention in an in-use position.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A series of devices for hanging rebar steel rods used in the reinforcement of concrete, especially in the preparation of footings for building foundations. Each device has a rest head top portion, a shaft intermediate portion, and a tail bottom portion with an optional rearwardly disposed spacer section, depending upon whether the device is a primary level or secondary level device.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Introduction

As a preface, it is to be noted that the various embodiments of this invention all comprise three separate portions and an optional fourth portion, the tail, all of which are preferably formed into an integrated structure. The upper portion is the rest head portion used for attachment. The rest head portion is available in two styles, a hook and an overlay.

The intermediate portion is a linear shaft. The lower portion is the base and is used as the retainer or retention portion to hold the rebar rods. The retainer portion may be configured to hold one piece or two such rebar rods in a horizontal spaced configuration.

A secondary unit or device of this invention may be attached to and depend from a primary unit. A secondary unit may hold one or two horizontally disposed rebar rods as is deemed required by the site engineer. It is seen therefore that the invention herein is intended for the support of one, two, or four rebar rods, since in most if not all states, the use of three rebar rods in a footing is not specified. Note however that certain designs, especially high walls, may require multiple horizontally spaced rebar.

In addition to the attachment shaft and retainer portions, some units may include a spacer which is attached to the shaft just above the junction of the retainer portion to the shaft portion. The purpose of the spacer portion is to keep the shaft horizontally spaced away from the footing forms and to maintain the shaft in a generally vertical disposition.

A tail may be found in some instances on the end of the distal part of the retainer portion.

The devices of this invention can be formed of one of each of the elements or portions set forth and discussed herein as well as including an optional tail.

The discussion now references the figures. As mentioned earlier herein, the various embodiments herein are made up of “mix and match” parts or sections forming an integrated unit or device according to this invention. Thus, in FIG. 1, there is seen the first of two head portions. This one 15 is referred to as a nail rest head for the simple reason that is designed to rest on the head of a nail part way driven into one of the wood or other material foundation or footing forms being used to create a reinforced concrete shape. Reference is made to FIG. 19 where such a nail head is seen. Further discussion will follow infra on this point.

Nail rest head 15 is formed of a distal leg 16 connected at one end to one end of an arcuate section 17 which in turn is connected at its second end to a proximal section 18. Proximal section 18 in turn connects seamlessly to shaft 11 as will be seen infra. Note that both the distal and proximal legs are in the same vertical plane, IE appear parallel when viewed from the front of the device.

In FIG. 2, the second rest is seen. This is referred to as an overlay rest head because it overlays the thickness of a 2×6 or 2×8 board used in the formation of the concrete pour. The overlay head is configured as an inverted U with interior hard corners and is designated 60. It includes a distal leg 64 connected at about a right angle to an elongated straight intermediate section 63 which in turn is connected to a proximal leg 63 to form the generally inverted U-shaped hard interior corner overlay rest head that conforms in shape to a stood on end 2×10 wood plank or smaller thickness wherein height can range from ten to twelve inches. Junction point 61 is the point of connection to a shaft 11.

In both instances, the rest head connects seamlessly to the shaft since it is preferred that both as well as the tail be made of a uniform thickness piece of metallic wire or plastic. In FIG. 3, there is seen the shaft portion 11 which is an elongated section of wire or plastic that is integrally attached on one end to a base and on the other end to a rest head to form a unit according to this invention. The shaft may vary from about ⅛ to 3/16 inch thick and about six inches long.

The discussion now moves to FIG. 4 where the simplest U base portion 24 is seen. It is a generally U-shaped hook member 25 integrally formed and attached at an oblique angle at point 26 to a shaft 11 shown here as cut off. The distal leg 29 is slightly longer than the opposed proximal leg 27 both of which are connected by an arcuate base section 28 disposed there between. Both legs 27,29 lie in the same vertical plane as shaft 11. But this vertical plane is rotated from the vertical plane of the legs of the nail rest head.

The U base with tail 30 of FIG. 5 is basically of the same configuration generally U-shaped member 25 but includes a tail 40. Tail 40 is disposed generally normal to the distal leg of the hook base in a plane lateral to said distal leg 29. See FIG. 11 and the discussion pertaining to that figure. The tail 41 also seen in FIG. 11 can be rotated back 90 degrees toward shaft 11 to help retain the rebar rods 13 shown in dashed lines within the base 30 to eliminate the need for any wire ties.

In FIG. 6, a V-shaped spacer 35 is seen. This spacer 35 attaches at its center or midpoint 34 to a point 23 on the hook base as is seen in FIG. 9. When attached, the end of each leg should be equally distant from the mount point 23. The Vee spacer serves to keep the shaft 11 in a vertical alignment and spaced from the footing former. Skipping over FIG. 7 momentarily. See also FIG. 8 which has a hook base and a tail thereon, plus the Vee spacer 35.

Turning now to the discussion of FIG. 7, there is seen a unit of slightly greater thickness of about 3/16-inch, which is than the diameter of units previously discussed. This is because the retainer section of this figure is intended to retain rebar rods of the #5 and #6 category which are heavier than the #4 rods normally retained in the devices having the smaller ⅛-inch diameter wire head, shaft and base. Number 4 rebar rods are the defacto standard variety used for footing concrete reinforcement.

The base shown here is referred to is a combination base and is configured as a modified or reinforced MJ base 50. Thus it is seen that this combination base has a hook and an additional shape attached to it. The details of the MJ base are recited elsewhere herein. This base has a straight spacer rather than a Vee spacer, which due to its configuration and its mode of attachment serves as a reinforcement for the retention of heavier rebar rods. Thus spacer 59 is seen to have two parts, the true spacer part 59A which is rearwardly directed and the reinforcement part 59B which is attached beneath the base as discussed below.

The shaft 11 is seen in this view broken away to indicate its relative placement in relation to the base. The MJ base per se has a first proximal leg 55 which seamlessly blends into arcuate section 57 which is attached to first distal leg 58. A wavy connector section 51 is attached to a second proximal leg, 52 followed by a second arcuate section 53 of substantially the same size as the first arcuate section, which in turn terminates at a second distal leg 54. All four legs, lie in the same parallel plane. The first distal leg 58 and the second proximal leg 52 are of the same elevation to best retain rebar of the same diameter, which when resting in the base, the rebar pieces would be of the same elevation.

The reinforcing stylized S-shaped section 59 serves as a single spacer and is connected at its proximal terminus beneath the wavy section 51 and optionally beneath the first arcuate section 57. This stylized S shape reinforces and supports the center of this dual rebar rod retainer base. The wave in the wavy section also adds strength over the use of a straight horizontal interposed section beneath legs 52 and 58. A complete unit of this invention that incorporates a non-modified MJ base that is one without the S reinforcement as seen in FIG. 13 and will be discussed infra. Spacer part 59A serves in the same manner as other single spacers discussed elsewhere herein. It is to be noted that while the top section of this device is not seen, it is to be understood that due to the use of only a single member spacer and not the Vee-shaped spacer that only an overlay top or upper section should be employed. The possibility of torque or turning of the device from a position 90 degrees to the footing form to a smaller or greater angle is avoided when the overlay top portion is employed.

In FIG. 8, the hook base with tail 30 seen previously in FIG. 5 is again seen, but this time the Vee spacer 35 is attached at joint 34. This helps to demonstrate that the various components can be put together mix and match style using conventional welding or soldering techniques for metal parts and suitable adhesive if plastic components are to be attached to one another. Other permutations and combinations of components can also be created which intermix a rest head type with a shaft and a base.

The discussion now moves to a review of a plurality of fully integrated nail hangers which do indeed include a rest head, a shaft and a base disposed at the opposite end of the shaft. In FIG. 9, a first embodiment 10 of this invention is seen. It has a nail rest head 15 with the three parts 16,17,18 mentioned infra with respect to FIG. 1. It is seen that the proximal leg is integral to and in the same planes as the shaft 11. In fact, it is difficult to determine where the head rest ends and the shaft begins. The distal leg 16 is seen to be parallel to the shaft 11. The U-shaped member 25 is connected at joint 26 is attached at about a 45-degree angle to the shaft at joint 26. A Vee spacer 35 is attached at point 34 to the U-shaped member at a 45-degree angle also rearwardly directed. Note how the distal leg 16 of the rest head is disposed normal to the plane of the base's distal leg. These planar relationships are also seen in FIG. 10 which is relates to the device of FIG. 9 but from a different vantage point.

FIGS. 11 and 12 are taken from different vantage points relate to the second embodiment 100 of the invention. Here a nail rest head 15 is attached to the shaft 11 at the upper end of the shaft and a U base with tail 30 is attached at the lower end of the shaft. A Vee spacer 35 is welded to or otherwise attached to point 34. Base 30 is generally U-shaped with both legs being of about the same extension. The tail 40 is seen to be formed from the extension of the distal leg of the first embodiment's base. An arcuate section 42 is connected to both the distal leg 29 and to a straight section 41 which is disposed at about a right angle to the leg 29 and perpendicular to the direction of the rest head's vertical plane. If the base is placed in a vertical plane then it is seen that the Vee spacer is directed at a 45-degree angle thereto. See FIG. 12. Note here also how the shaft is at a 45-degree angle to the base.

The discussion now turns to FIGS. 13-15 inclusive. This third embodiment 200 has nail rest head 15, FIG. 15, a shaft 11 denoted in FIG. 13, and the MJ base discussed previously with respect to FIG. 7. As can be seen, the second distal leg 54 has a slightly greater extension than te primary proximal leg 55. But all four of the legs of the MJ base lie in the same parallel plane. Note also that the base is disposed at a 45-degree angle to the shaft and that the rest head is oriented in the same manner as has been discussed infra. From FIG. 14 it is seen that the Vee spacer is oriented at about a 45-degree angle to the parallel legs of the device and attached at point 34. From FIG. 15 the orientation of the distal arm 16 of head 15 as being 90 degrees to the base's plane orientation is readily seen. This is consistent with the discussion supra.

FIG. 16 depicts the fourth full embodiment 300. This embodiment incorporates the overlay rest 60 with the hard interior 90 degree corners discussed at length with respect to FIG. 1 and connected to a standard shaft 11. Note the 45-degree angle relationship at the junction point or joint 61. The modified MJ base of FIG. 7 is joined to the lower end of the shaft also in a 45-degree angle junction. Therefore, as per FIG. 16, the first proximal leg of the base looks parallel to the proximal arm 62 of the overlay rest. The modified S single spacer has also been discussed in conjunction with FIG. 7.

Several small points need to be mentioned. First, distal segment 64 is disposed slightly upwardly to create a springlike effect. Lower distal segment 65 is disposed slightly outwardly to create a handle like segment for easier application and removal. Note also break-off point 80. After the concrete is poured but before it hardens, all the time while most of the device is buried in concrete, the lower distal segment 65 is raised up so as to force a break or fracture at point 80, as the top section is removed from the 2×10 or other wood form, while the balance of the device remains buried in concrete even after the concrete hardens.

In view of the different configuration of the other portions of the device as contrasted to FIG. 7, the S-spacer here 70 has been renumbered. Here in FIG. 16, the true spacer 71 section is rearwardly directed in the same flat plane as the balance of the device when viewed from the side. The balance of the S-spacer's segments 72,73,74 abut the curvature of the MJ base 50 and the S-spacer is welded or otherwise attached to the base at several locations for reinforcement of the base.

FIG. 17, which relates to a fifth embodiment 400 marries a U base 24 and Vee spacer, also seen in FIG. 10, to a shaft 11 at the same 45-degree angle but with an overlay head 60 again attached in like manner at a 45-degree angle. This further illustrates the mix and match of components to achieve rebar retainers for different types of footing installations. FIG. 18 shows the device of FIG. 17 from a different vantage point such that the angular relationships are readily seen. Breakpoint 80 is readily seen as a cut in the metal or plastic.

FIG. 19 depicts the device of FIG. 1, namely embodiment 10, in a simulated in-use environment of a footing pre-pour. Here a unit of the embodiment 10 variety is seen hanging from a nail 80 which has been hammered into position in a board 81 suspended above the ground 82. Note how the Vee spacer 35 rests on the board 81 such that the disposition of the base is spaced away from the board 81. A rebar rod 13 rests within the base 25 of the device 10. This footing will thus be reinforced when poured by a single rebar rod.

As previously discussed there are primary and secondary rebar retainers within this invention. Secondary holders or retainers are mounted to and are disposed vertically below a primary holder of any configuration. In FIG. 19, a simple secondary unit is seen designated embodiment 500. It has a nail rest head attached to a shaft and U or hook base in which a lower disposed rebar rod 13B is dwelling spaced down from the rod 13. The secondary rod retainer 500 has a head that is not offset and thus the inverted arcuate U head 21 integrates straight on with the shaft 11. This is because in use it hangs down from an already spaced out primary retainer. By having its rest head 11 disposed within the U hook 24 of the primary unit. For the pre-spacing reason noted, no spacer is needed on the base of embodiment 500 due to where it is hung from a primary unit and not from a footing former.

In FIG. 20, a solely secondary level hanger is seen. It is designated second level because it is disposed hanging from the upper or primary level rebar hanger. Such a secondary level device is used when the engineer has called for two vertically spaced rebar rods. For the present device the secondary level rebar rods are to be two in number not just a single rebar rod.

Since unit 600, the seventh embodiment, is suspended from any primary level device from within the rod retaining section thereof, it is seen that the rest which is an inverted arcuate U designated 21 can be integrally formed from a single wire draw by proper bending. The distal arm of the head is in the same parallel plane as the shaft 11 due to the nature of its hanging disposition. But the distal arm is not in the same flat vertical plane as the balance of the device. Rather the distal arm 22 and the intermediate section is rotated 180 degrees to the plane of the balance of the device in view of the fact that this secondary unit is to be suspended from a primary unit yet retain the rebar rods in the same general elongated disposition as the rebar rods being retained spaced above in the primary retainer.

The base 65 is referred to as an offset W base. It is formed of two segments 66. Each segment 66 consists of a J-shaped mirror image section 68A and 68B each of which is integrally joined to an offset section 67A,67B respectively. While here one of the segments 66 is integrally formed as part of a wire draw, it can also exist as a fully separate piece that is welded onto an end of shaft 11 in the same manner that the base segment of 67A and 66B is attached as by welding.

Reference is now made to FIG. 21. A unit of embodiment 200 is seen disposed from the nail 70. See FIG. 13 again. It is retaining two spaced rebar rods spaced away from the former board 71 and spaced from each other as well. The spacing between rods is about 3.5 inches laterally in a horizontal plane. Suspended from the wave connector 50—per FIG. 13, is a secondary retainer of the type seen in FIG. 20 and discussed in detail. This secondary unit 600 also retains two rebar rods in a spaced relationship. The lower rods are each in a direct vertical plane aligned with the rod above them and of the same 3½-inch spacing between themselves. The combination of this or other primary and secondary units is used for deep footings when two rows of dual rebar rods is specified.

In FIG. 22, the actual suspension of the just discussed secondary unit 600 is seen suspended from the wave connector 50 of the primary unit. FIG. 23 is a closeup of the bottom of the device 600 showing the suspended rebar rods above the ground 72.

FIG. 24 illustrates the mounting of an overlay rest head as seen in FIG. 2 upon a forming board 71. No nail is utilized and thus these heads can be quickly installed with a bit less labor.

While the orientation of the two legs of the nail rest head has been discussed relative to FIG. 9. This orientation also applies to the rest heads seen in FIGS. 11 and 13 as well. In the same manner, the discussion re the distance of the ends of the legs of the Vee spacer from the mount point is applicable to all such uses of a Vee spacer.

It is seen that we have devised a series of rebar rod hangers which consist of a head connected to a shaft which in turn is connected to a base which may have tail thereon. A spacer is found attached to the rear of primary units to keep them spaced from a footing former board or other material. The devices of this invention can be created as by wire forming manually or by machine with the extra sections, namely, the spacers being welded or soldered in to place.

While it has been stated that a U-shaped base may or may not include a tail, it is to be understood that the purpose of the tail is to secure two rods overlaid upon each other as shown in the dashed lines, said rebar rods being designated 13 each to retain them without the use of wire ties. The securing is done by bending the tail 41 counterclockwise 90 degrees toward the shaft to retain the two rods in a semi-secure position without having to resort to wire ties. Note directional arrow 81.

While it has been indicated that the Vee spacer should be mounted to the base such that the distal end of each leg of the Vee is equidistant to the mount point, the angle of elevation relative to the hook should be about 45 degrees to endure a generally vertical disposition of the device when being utilized.

The big benefit of these devices is that they eliminate the need for wire tying of horizontal rebar or members to form a reinforcement grid for a footing. Such tying is labor intensive and therefore costly to the contractor. But more importantly there is the unspecified time spent to ensure parallelism of the rods and uniform vertical spacing in dual level installations as well. These measurements are eliminated by the use of the devices of this invention which automatically achieve even spacing in both directions.

While the Vee spacer gives a more even balancing away from the footing former board, and is thus preferred, a single spacer can be used with a base designed to hold two rods horizontally, as such a unit will tend to stand straight away 90 degrees from the former and not bend in one direction or the other angularly toward the footing former. It is preferred however to use the single spacer primarily with the overlay rest.

The easiest way to form the devices of this invention is to form them from wire and if a Vee spacer is used, to weld the spacer at its midpoint into position with the end of each leg of the Vee spacer being equidistant to the base. A disposition of about 45 degrees from the horizontal is suggested.

Since certain changes may be made in the above described apparatus without departing from the scope of the invention herein involved, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description and in the accompanying drawings, if present, shall be interpreted as illustrative only and not in a limiting sense.





 
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