Title:
Manual actuation of PTO-based chuck
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
In a power driver having a chuck coupled to a drive train, an arrangement (to manually impart rotation to the drive train) includes: a housing; and a coupling mounted at least partially in the housing and connected to the drive train, the coupling being accessible though the housing, and the coupling being manually actuatable to apply a torque upon the drive train.



Inventors:
Puzio, Daniel (US)
Application Number:
11/400376
Publication Date:
11/02/2006
Filing Date:
04/10/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E21B17/22
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20040182587Signal processing and control device for a power torque toolSeptember, 2004May et al.
20100326685HAND-HELD POWER TOOLDecember, 2010Roehm
20040089461Downhole percussion drilling apparatusMay, 2004Cioceanu
20170036315Method for Operating a Hand-Held Power Tool, Hand-Held Power ToolFebruary, 2017Wimitzer et al.
20070295521HAND POWER TOOLDecember, 2007Wiker et al.
20140360743Rock drilling machine, rotating sleeve and method for lubricationDecember, 2014Muuttonen
20100071920POWER TOOLMarch, 2010Lau et al.
20170057072HAND-HELD POWER TOOLMarch, 2017Holubarsch et al.
20050098333Air valve of pneumatic motor of screwdriver and air path of the air valveMay, 2005Lee
20130118769AIR PRESSURE REUSED PNEUMATIC HAMMER DRILLMay, 2013Lee
20060243470Manual actuation of PTO-based chuckNovember, 2006Puzio



Primary Examiner:
GERRITY, STEPHEN FRANCIS
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HARNESS, DICKEY & PIERCE, P.L.C. (RESTON, VA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A power driver comprising: a housing; an armature shaft mounted in the housing; a chuck mounted on the housing and coupled to a first end of the armature shaft; and a coupling mounted to a second end of the armature shaft, the coupling being accessible through the housing.

2. The power driver of claim 1, wherein the coupling cooperates with an external tool to apply a torque to the armature shaft.

3. The power driver of claim 1, wherein the chuck is a power take off (PTO) actuated type of chuck.

4. In a power driver having a chuck coupled to a drive train, an arrangement to manually impart rotation to the drive train, the arrangement comprising: a housing; and a coupling mounted at least partially in the housing and connected to the drive train, the coupling being accessible though the housing, and the coupling being manually actuatable to apply a torque upon the drive train.

5. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the coupling includes: first and second components having respective cooperating features to achieve a rotational connection; and a spring mounted on the first component to bias the first component to be disengaged from the second component.

6. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the coupling includes: a spur gear on the drive train; an axle mounted on the housing parallel to the drive train; a socket, a first end of which is mounted for rotation on the axle, a circumferential surface of the first end having gearing that meshes with the spur gear, and and a second end of which cooperates with an external tool to apply a torque to the drive train.

7. The arrangement of claim 6, wherein the coupling further includes: a spring to bias the gearing on the first end of the socket to be disengaged from the spur gear.

8. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the coupling includes: a component of the drive train having helical gearing; a worm mounted on the housing orthogonal to the drive train, gearing on the worm being meshable with the helical gearing of the component, and an end of the worm cooperating with an external tool to apply a torque to the drive train.

9. The arrangement of claim 8, wherein the coupling further includes: a spring to bias the gearing on the worm to be disengaged from the helical gearing on the component.

10. The arrangement of claim 8, wherein the worm includes a non-geared shaft adjacent the worm gearing to limit a magnitude of torque that can be applied to the drive train.

11. The arrangement of claim 10, wherein: the drive train includes a motor having an armature shaft, and a pinion connected to the armature shaft; and the component is the pinion.

12. The arrangement of claim 9, wherein the pinion is connected to one of a side of the motor adjacent to or opposite of a transmission.

13. The arrangement of claim 8, wherein: the drive train includes a transmission having gears; and the component is one of the gears in the transmission.

14. The arrangement of claim 8, wherein the component is one of the gears in the PTO actuated chuck.

15. The arrangement of claim 4, further comprising: a gasket to make a seal where between the coupling and the housing proximal to where the coupling is accessible though the housing.

16. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the coupling is arranged to be manually actuatable to apply a torque upon the drive train only in a direction that loosens jaws of the PTO-actuated chuck.

17. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the coupling extends proximal to an aperture in the housing.

18. The arrangement of claim 4, wherein the chuck is a power take off (PTO) actuated type of chuck.

19. A power driver having a drive train, the power driver comprising: a housing; and a coupling mounted on the housing for rotation about a first axis to selectively apply a torque upon the drive train, the first axis being angled with respect to a rotational second axis of the power driver.

20. The power driver of clam 19, wherein the first axis is substantially orthogonal with respect to the second axis.

21. The power driver of claim 19, further comprising: a power take off (PTO) actuated type of chuck.

Description:

PRIORITY STATEMENT

This application claims the priority of U.S. Patent provisional Application No. 60/672,499, filed on Apr. 19, 2005, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.

Commonly-assigned, copending provisional Application, “TOOL CHUCK WITH POWER TAKE OFF FEATURE,” United States Provisional Patent Application, Att'y Docket No. 0275L-000980/US was filed Sep. 16, 2005 with the USPTO and has been allotted Ser. No. 11/227,200, and is hereafter referred to as “the '200 application.” Commonly-assigned, copending provisional Application, “TOOL CHUCK WITH POWER TAKE OFF AND DEAD SPINDLE FEATURES,” was filed Apr. 19, 2005 with the USPTO and has been allotted Ser. No. 60/672,503, and is hereafter referred to as the “the '503 application.” The entirety of each of the '200 and '503 applications also is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

Drill/driver devices include a chuck. A power take off (PTO) mechanism-type of chuck, e.g., as taught by the '200 application and/or the '503 application, is a chuck for which the power by which its jaws are opened or closed is provided by the PTO mechanism.

If a battery by which a motor of the drill/driver device is unavailable or too depleted to adequately source power to the motor, then the Background Art PTO mechanism-powered chuck may be unable to be opened if, e.g., an accessory remains clamped in the chuck.

In addition, there can be a circumstance in which the chuck is substantially enshrouded by the housing of the drill/driver. In that circumstance, a user is prevented from grasping the chuck. Consequently, the chuck cannot be opened manually as it cannot be grasped and rotated against the rotational friction provided by the non-energized motor.

SUMMARY

An embodiment of the present invention provides (in a power driver having a chuck coupled to a drive train) an arrangement to manually impart rotation to the drive train. Such an arrangement can include: a housing; and a coupling mounted at least partially in the housing and connected to the drive train, the coupling being accessible though the housing, and the coupling being manually actuatable to apply a torque upon the drive train.

An embodiment of the present invention provides a power driver that includes: a housing; an armature shaft mounted in the housing; a chuck mounted on the housing and coupled to a first end of the armature shaft; and a coupling mounted to a second end of the armature shaft, the coupling being accessible through the housing.

An embodiment of the present invention provides a power driver having a drive train, the power driver including: a housing; and a coupling mounted on the housing for rotation about a first axis to selectively apply a torque upon the drive train, the first axis being angled with respect to a rotational second axis of the power driver.

Additional features and advantages of the present invention will be more fully apparent from the following detailed description of example embodiments, the accompanying drawings and the associated claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings are intended to depict example embodiments of the present invention and should not be interpreted to limit the scope thereof. The accompanying drawings are not to be considered as drawn to scale unless explicitly noted. Like elements are represented by like reference numerals.

FIG. 1 is a side view of a manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a three-quarter perspective view of a drill/driver that incorporates the manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a three-quarter perspective view of a drill/driver that incorporates another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an end view (taken at section line V-V′ of FIG. 4) of the drill/driver of FIG. 4, and another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck found therein, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6A is an end view of another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck found, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6B is a side view of the manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck of FIG. 6A.

FIG. 7 is a three-quarter perspective view of some example locations for other manual actuation assemblies for a PTO-based chuck PTO-based chuck drive train, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 8A and 8B are end views of another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck at different points in the operation thereof, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

It will be understood that if an element or layer is referred to as being “on,” “against,” “connected to” or “coupled to” another element or layer, then it can be directly on, against connected or coupled to the other element or layer, or intervening elements or layers may be present. In contrast, if an element is referred to as being “directly on”, “directly connected to” or “directly coupled to” another element or layer, then there are no intervening elements or layers present. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout. As used herein, the term “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

Spatially relative terms, such as “beneath”, “below”, “lower”, “above”, “upper” and the like, may be used herein for ease of description to describe one element or feature's relationship to another element(s) or feature(s) as illustrated in the figures. It will be understood that the spatially relative terms are intended to encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the orientation depicted in the figures. For example, if the device in the figures is turned over, elements described as “below” or “beneath” other elements or features would then be oriented “above” the other elements or features. Thus, term such as “below” can encompass both an orientation of above and below. The device may be otherwise oriented (rotated 90 degrees or at other orientations) and the spatially relative descriptors used herein interpreted accordingly.

Although the terms first, second, etc. may be used herein to describe various elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections, it should be understood that these elements, components, regions, layers and/or sections should not be limited by these terms. These terms are used only to distinguish one element, component, region, layer or section from another region, layer or section. Thus, a first element, component, region, layer or section discussed below could be termed a second element, component, region, layer or section without departing from the teachings of the present invention.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “includes” and/or “including”, when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

In some of the figures, reference numbers are reused where the same component may be used in more than one drawing. After a component is initially introduced and discussed, repetitive discussion of the component is kept to a minimum for the sake of brevity. Rather, further discussion focuses upon the new context in which the component is depicted in the additional drawing(s).

FIG. 1 is a side view of a manual actuation assembly 100 for a PTO-based chuck (not shown), according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 1, manual actuation assembly 100 may include: a motor 102; an armature shaft 104 of motor 102; and a coupling 106. Armature shaft 104 may be extended out of the rear of motor 102, e.g., on an opposite side of motor 102 with respect to the PTO-based chuck (not depicted in FIG. 1). Armature shaft 104 may be faceted. Coupling 106 may include a complementarily-shaped recess 108 so that, when mounted thereon, coupling 106 is rotationally fixed to armature shaft 104. Coupling 106 also may include a recess 110, e.g., configured to be hex-faceted so as to receive a standard Allen wrench (also known as hex-type wrench of Allen key) (not shown in FIG. 1) or the like; a recess such as recess 110 hereafter will be referred to as a hex recess.

Insertion of the Allen wrench into recess 110 makes it possible for the user to apply a torque to the drive train, i.e., to rotate armature shaft 104, via rotation of the Allen wrench. In manual actuation assembly 100, over-torque protection may be provided via a clutch (not depicted) in the transmission (not depicted) of the drill driver.

FIG. 2 is a three-quarter perspective view of a drill/driver 200 that incorporates manual actuation assembly 100, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 2, coupling 106 (and hex recess 110 therein) is disposed at the rear of a housing 212 of drill/driver 200, at an end opposite to a PTO-based chuck 214. A user may insert an Allen wrench 207 into hex recess 110 of coupling 106 in order to manually rotate armature shaft 104.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of another manual actuation assembly 300 for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 3, manual actuation assembly 300 may include: a motor 302; an armature shaft 304 of motor 302; a coupling 306; and a spur gear pair 301. Armature shaft 304 may be extended out of the rear of motor 302, e.g., on an opposite side of motor 302 with respect to the PTO-based chuck (not depicted in FIG. 3). A spur gear 309 may be rotationally fixed to armature shaft 304.

An axle 317 may be cantilevered from motor 302 parallel to armature shaft 304. A recess 308 at a first end of coupling 306 may receive the unsupported end of axle 317. A radially exterior surface at the first end of coupling 306 proximal to motor 302 may be provided with a gearing 303 to mesh with gearing 305 on a radially outer surface of spur gear 309.

Spur gearing 303 and 305 are normally not in mesh because a spring 316 pushes coupling 306 away from motor 302. Upon insertion of Allen wrench 207 through an opening 318 in a housing 312 and into a hex recess 310 formed at a second end of coupling 306, Allen wrench 207 can be used to displace spur gearing 303 toward spur gearing 305 in opposition to the bias force of spring 316. Once spur gearing 303 and spur gearing 305 are engaged, Allen wrench 207 can be rotated to apply a torque indirectly to armature shaft 104.

FIG. 4 is a three-quarter perspective view of a drill/driver 400 that incorporates another manual actuation assembly for a PTO-based chuck, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 4, an aperture 418 is provided in a housing 412. A user may insert Allen wrench 207 through aperture 418 into a hex recess 522 (see FIG. 5) in a coupling 406 in order to manually apply a torque to the drive train (not shown in FIG. 4).

FIG. 5 is an end view (taken at section line V-V′ of FIG. 4) of drill/driver 400 that includes another manual actuation assembly 500 for a PTO-based chuck found therein, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 5, manual actuation assembly 500 for a PTO-based chuck may include: a spur gear 509; worm gearing 524 on coupling 406; a leaf spring 526; and a spring-foundation 528, which may include, e.g., posts 528 and 530 between which leaf spring 526 is disposed.

Leaf spring 526 is disposed to force worm gearing 524 out of engagement with spur gearing 505 during normal drill/driver use. For manual operation, Allen wrench 207 is inserted into aperture 418 and engages hex recess 522 of coupling 406. Further insertion of Allen wrench 207 bias advances worm gearing 524 into engagement with spur gearing 505. Then rotation of Allen wrench 207 may apply a torque to a component of the drive train 504, e.g., an armature shaft, and thus PTO-based chuck 214.

Manual actuation assembly 500 may be arranged to rotate drive train component 504 only in one direction to loosen PTO-based chuck 214, not tighten. The effective rotational direction of Allen wrench 207 may be embossed on housing 412. Manual actuation assembly 500 may be adapted to limit the torque that the user can manually apply, as is discussed in more detail below.

FIG. 6A is an end view of another manual actuation assembly 600 for a PTO-based chuck found, according to an embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 6B is a side view of manual actuation assembly 600.

In FIG. 6, manual actuation assembly 600 for a PTO-based chuck may include: a spur gear 609 having both spur gearing 605 and worm gearing 644; worm gearing 624 on coupling 606; a coil spring 640; and a recess 638, in a housing 612, in which is disposed spring 640; and an O-ring 633.

Coupling 606 differs from coupling 406, e.g., by including a non-geared shaft 634 extending from worm gearing 624. Spur gear 609 may be an adaptation of a standard front motor pinion. For example, spur gear 609 may be formed with the powdered metal process in order to incorporate both spur gear geometry and worm gear geometry.

O-ring seal 633 is optionally provided to reduce, if not prevent, contaminant intrusion into an interior space of housing 612. A similar type of seal can be provided as an alternative arrangement on other embodiments of the present invention.

Coil spring 640 is disposed to force shaft 634 upward, and thus force worm gearing 624 out of engagement with spur gearing 605 during normal drill/driver use. For manual operation, Allen wrench 207 is inserted into aperture 418 and engages hex recess 622 of coupling 406. Further insertion of Allen wrench 207 bias advances worm gearing 624 into engagement with spur gearing 605. Then rotation of Allen wrench 207 may apply a torque to a component 604 of the drive train (e.g., the armature shaft) and thus PTO-based chuck 214.

Manual actuation assembly 600 may be arranged to drive train component 604 only in one direction to loosen PTO-based chuck 214, not tighten. The effective rotational direction of Allen wrench 207 may be embossed on housing 412.

FIG. 7 is a three-quarter perspective view of some example locations for other manual actuation assemblies for a PTO-based chuck drive train 700, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

In FIG. 7, a coupling 706 is provided, where coupling 706 may be similar, e.g., to coupling 406 or 606. Coupling 706 may be provided in cooperation with a pinion 705 rearward of a motor 702. Alternatively, a coupling 706′ may be provided in cooperation with a pinion 736 forward of motor 702 but rearward of a transmission 746. Alternatively, a coupling 706″ may be provided in cooperation with a spur gear 748 internally to transmission 746. Alternatively, a coupling 706′″ may be provided in cooperation with a spur gear 750 forward of transmission 746. It is to be noted that the closer to a PTO-based chuck 714 that the coupling resides, the greater the torque that will be required on Allen wrench 207 (not shown in FIG. 7) to loosen PTO-based chuck 714.

FIGS. 8A and 8B are end views of another manual actuation assembly 800 for a PTO-based chuck at different points in the operation thereof, according to an embodiment of the present invention.

Manual actuation assembly 800 may include: a spur gear 809; a coupling 806; leaf springs 858 and 862; and spring-foundations 860 and 864, which may include, e.g., posts 830A &832A and 830B &832B between which leaf springs 860 and 864 are disposed, respectively.

Coupling 806 may include: a non-geared shaft 852 having a recess 822 (e.g., a hex recess) at one end; worm gearing 824 formed at the other end of shaft 852; a non-geared shaft 834 extending from worm gearing 824; and a bearing end 856 formed at the opposite end of shaft 834 relative to worm gearing 824.

Leaf spring 858 is disposed to force worm gearing 824 out of engagement with spur gearing 805 during normal drill/driver use. For manual operation, Allen wrench 207 (not shown in FIG. 8A) is inserted into aperture 818 and engages hex recess 822 of coupling 806. Further insertion of Allen wrench 207 bias advances worm gearing 824 into engagement with spur gearing 805. Then rotation of Allen wrench 207 may apply a torque to drive train component 804 (e.g., armature shaft) and thus PTO-based chuck 214.

The user has inserted Allen wrench 207 and applies bias and rotation to engage spur gearing 805. Once engaged, the user applies torque to rotate drive train component 804 and the PTO-based chuck mechanism (not shown in FIGS. 8A and 8B). Leaf spring 862 is provided to facilitate over-torque protection. As the user applies a greater and greater torque and the PTO-based chuck does not loosen, further rotation of worm gearing 824 by the user will advance worm gearing 824, further compressing springs 858 and 862 while moving worm gearing 824 out of engagement with spur gearing 805, which limits further torque that can be applied. If worm gearing is disposed to position shown in FIG. 8B, e.g., then maintenance upon manual actuation assembly 800 and/or the PTO-based chuck may be appropriate.

Allen wrench 207 and the various corresponding hex recesses X10 may take other configurations, e.g. a Torx driver and corresponding Torx-shaped recess, respectively, etc.

With some embodiments of the present invention having thus been described, it will be obvious that the same may be varied in many ways. Such variations are not to be regarded as a departure from the spirit and scope of the present invention, and all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of the present invention.