Title:
Method and device for curling hair
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
This invention relates to a device and method for curling hair. A fabric strip impregnated with hair lotion is placed along the length of a twisted section of dry hair, and beginning at the tips of the hair, the hair is wound around the central portion of the fabric strip and the ends of the fabric strip may then be securely tied. The hair is then left to allow the curls to set. In a second embodiment of the invention, the lotion impregnated fabric strips may be used in conjunction with cylindrical hair rollers.



Inventors:
Cross, Matthew Bernard (Kent, GB)
Application Number:
11/390818
Publication Date:
10/05/2006
Filing Date:
03/28/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45D2/00; A45D2/12; A45D7/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
DOAN, ROBYN KIEU
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
J. Michael Martinez de Andino, Esq. (Richmond, VA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A device for the treatment of hair which comprises a strip of fabric impregnated with hair treatment lotion.

2. A device according to claim 1 comprising a plurality of said strips connected end to end and separable by means of perforations.

3. A device according to claim 2, wherein said strips are contained in a fluid-tight container with a resealable opening allowing removal of said strips.

4. A device according to claim 3, wherein the resealable opening is a hole through which the connected strips can be pulled.

5. A method for treating hair comprising: winding a section of hair around a central portion of a fabric strip impregnated with hair treatment lotion, the fabric strip having first and second ends; and securing the ends of the strip together to hold the section of hair in place.

6. A method according to claim 5, further comprising: twisting the section of hair along its length before the action of winding the section of hair around the fabric strip.

7. A method according to claim 5, wherein the hair is dry.

8. A method for treating hair comprising: placing a strip of fabric impregnated with hair treatment lotion along a length of a section of hair; winding said strip around a cylindrical hair roller; and securing said strip to the roller.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to Application No. GB 0506295.5, filed Mar. 29, 2005, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a device for an improved method of curling hair.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Various types of hair curlers are commercially available. Most hair curlers consist of a rigid material, such as wire mesh, or perforated plastics, shaped into a cylindrical hollow body, and once the hair is curled around the rollers, they are kept in place by hair pins or the like. Some hair curlers are provided with a roughened surface, such as bristles, to reduce slippage of the hair on the roller and so facilitate the curling. However, such rollers, also, must be kept in place by hair pins or the like.

Other hair curlers may be composed of a cylindrical foam body, which are held in the hair by either pins or clamps or the like. However, the foam is easily compressed due to a low resilience, and it becomes difficult to hold the hair taut enough to produce the elastic stressing needed to produce curls. These rollers also must be kept in place by hair pins or the like.

With known hair curlers, the setting or conditioning lotion is sprayed onto the hair once the hair has been wound around the roller, which, especially if long hair is to be treated, can result in the outer region of the hair wound being more intensely moistened with the setting or conditioning lotion than the underneath layers. As a result, a non-uniform waving occurs and the hair is subjected to different conditions over its length. Also, as the setting lotion is sprayed directly onto the head, the lotion comes into direct contact with the scalp, which can cause irritation.

Generally, the tension achieved by winding the hair around such known cylindrical hair rollers is insufficient on its own to cause curling, and as such the hair is often dried in the presence of heat in order for the curls to set. The combination of the heat and setting lotion can however be damaging to the hair, and cause it to become weak and brittle.

It is an object of this invention to overcome the various disadvantages of known hair curlers and to provide a convenient device that does not require any fixing pins or clamps, does not require heat or steam, and enables an even and measured distribution of the setting or conditioning lotion over the hair to be curled, while also reducing the contact of the setting lotion with the scalp thereby protecting the scalp from possible scalp irritation. It is a further object of the invention to provide improved means for applying a variety of liquid treatment materials to the hair, for example dyes, setting lotions and conditioners.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The device of the invention comprises a woven or non-woven fabric which is impregnated with the desired setting or conditioning lotion, and shaped into conveniently sized strips. The non-woven fabric may be similar to the fabric commonly used for baby wipes. The fabric strips may be held in a resealable air-tight container, which allows the sequential removal of one fabric strip at a time through a hole in the container. The fabric strips may be loosely joined to one another at either end, for example by using perforations, allowing many or single strips to be removed in one action, and so that the removal of each strip pulls the end of the next strip through the hole in the container enabling its subsequent removal. The hole in the container can be covered when not in use, to prevent evaporation of the liquid impregnant.

The fabric strips are preferably used on dry hair. The hair should be divided into manageable sections and the fabric strip placed next to the first length of hair. Ideally, the section of hair to be curled is twisted along its length, and then beginning at the tips of the hair the hair should be neatly and uniformly wound around the central portion of the fabric strip, allowing a short length at both ends of the fabric strip. The two ends of the fabric strip may then be tied together in a knot, which should be tight enough to hold the curl in place, but loose enough to be able to remove once the curl has set. The fabric strips are made of a non-woven material which is preferably relatively non-elastic, and thus allows a relatively tight knot to hold the curl tightly in position. The hair is then left to allow the curls to set.

As the conditioner or setting lotion is already impregnated into the fabric strip, and therefore does not need to be sprayed onto the hair once the hair is wound around the fabric strip, the setting lotion or conditioner is in full contact with the full length of hair, allowing any excess lotion that is absorbed by the hair to be reabsorbed by the fabric, and any lotion that is not absorbed by the hair to be retained by the fabric. Thus, the hair only retains the required quantities of setting or conditioning lotion, which ensures a natural wave and is preferable for the condition of the hair.

The hair may be wound relatively tightly around the fabric strip, thereby achieving a sufficiently high level of tension within the hair to eliminate the need for heat drying, which can be damaging to the hair. The curls in the hair may therefore be allowed to set naturally at room temperature.

As only the ends of the fabric strip are required to secure the device, there is no need for pins or similar to secure the device. Hence, the number of parts needed is reduced.

The size of the curl may be determined by the width and the thickness of the fabric strip. In order to achieve a larger curl, the thickness of the fabric strip may be increased either by simply folding the fabric or by laying more than one fabric strip together.

In a further embodiment of the invention, the lotion impregnated fabric strips may be used in conjunction with the already commercially available cylindrical hair rollers. The fabric strip may be placed along the length of the hair, between the hair and the hair roller, and the hair can be wound around the roller and secured with a pin or the like in the usual way. The lotion impregnated into the fabric strip is therefore in contact with the full length of the hair to be curled, thus allowing lotion to be absorbed into the hair, and any water in the hair or excess lotion to be reabsorbed into the fabric strip. The size or diameter of the hair roller may be varied to achieve the desired size of curl.

Different lotions may be impregnated into the fabric strip depending upon the desired treatment for the hair. These may include a mild conditioner, an intense conditioner, a hair colour lightener, a setting lotion for fixed curls, and a lotion for smoothing and conditioning the hair to reduce hair frizz.

The device is inexpensive to manufacture, relatively compact in size, and comes as a single part thereby eliminating the need for pins or other such securing means and the need for setting or conditioning lotion.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate preferred embodiments thereof.

FIGS. 1 to 4 are schematic perspective views showing successive steps in a hair curling method, and using a hair curling device, embodying the invention;

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a method in accordance with a further embodiment and FIG. 7 shows how the impregnated strips of the invention can be pulled from a sealable container.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In FIG. 1, there is the device, 10, embodying the invention in the form of a fabric strip, and formed of a non-woven fabric, such as the type commonly used for baby wipes, impregnated with a hair treatment liquid such as setting lotion. FIG. 1 shows a section of hair, 12, which has been twisted along its length, and at the root end of the hair has been wound over the fabric strip.

FIG. 2, shows more of the same section of hair wound around the central portion of the fabric strip.

FIG. 3, shows the full section of hair 14 wound completely around the fabric strip up to the tips of the hair.

FIG. 4, shows the two ends 15, 16 of the fabric strip crossed over one another above the wound section of hair. These two ends may be tied together to secure the curl 14 in place.

Similar sections of hair may be wound using the procedure illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 4 until the full head of hair has been wound onto the fabric strips. Alternatively, the hair may be wound beginning at the end of the hair. The hair is then left to set at room temperature, after which the fabric strips may be removed.

FIG. 5 shows a further embodiment of the invention, showing the use of the fabric strip, 20, in combination with the already known cylindrical hair rollers, 22. FIG. 5 shows the fabric strip placed against the full length of the hair to be curled. For long hair, several fabric strips joined at their ends may be used. The hair roller is placed on top of the fabric strip, so that the fabric strip lies between the hair and the roller, preferably towards the tips of the hair.

FIG. 6 shows the full length of the hair wound onto the roller up to the root of the hair. The roller may then be secured in place by conventional means, for example with a pin or clamp. Once the curls have set, the fabric strips and rollers may be removed.

FIG. 7 shows a fluid-tight container, 34 which contains the fabric strips and allows removal of the fabric strips one by one through a small resealable opening, 32. A hinged plug, 36 reseals the opening when not in use. Perforations, 30 which allow the fabric strips to be separated are shown.

It should be appreciated that modifications and alterations obvious to those skilled in the art may be made within the scope of the present claims. For example, while it is preferred for the fabric strip to be of a non-woven material, which has the advantage of being permeable and thus readily allowing the impregnation of hair lotions and allowing the reabsorption of excess water in the hair and excess hair lotion, whilst also being relatively non-elastic to allow the curl to be tightly secured during drying, other woven or non-woven fabrics may be used.