Title:
GAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game has a portable playing surface (e.g. a mat or a board). The playing surface is marked with or otherwise divided into a series of zones. A strike wheel is provided having a support portion (e.g. an arm) supporting a ball such that the ball can be struck by a club to move the ball in a rotational fashion, and a marker for moving across the playing surface. The “ball” referred to above may not be an actual ball. In some cases it may be a representation of a ball, for example a circular disk attached to the support portion, etc. The game allows for the marker to move from one zone to another zone in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction (i.e. a left diagonal), or in a forward but to the right direction (i.e. a right diagonal).



Inventors:
Speer, Arthur Frederick (Wellington, NZ)
Application Number:
11/419676
Publication Date:
09/07/2006
Filing Date:
05/22/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36; A63F3/00; A63F7/00; A63F7/06; A63F9/00; A63F11/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WEISS & MOY, P.C. (PHOENIX, AZ, US)
Claims:
What I claim is:

1. A game comprising a portable playing surface, the playing surface marked with or otherwise divided into a series of zones, a strike wheel having a support portion supporting a ball such that the ball can be struck by a club to cause the ball to move in a rotational fashion, and a marker for moving across the playing surface.

2. A game according to claim 1, wherein the ball is a representation of a ball.

3. A game according to claim 1, wherein the ball is a representation of a ball, and the game allows for the marker to be moved from one zone to another zone in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction, or in a forward but to the right direction.

4. A game according to claim 1, wherein the ball is a representation of a ball, the game allows for the marker to be moved from one zone to another zone in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction, or in a forward but to the right direction, and wherein the game includes at least one club suitable for striking the ball.

5. A game according to claim 1, wherein the ball is a representation of a ball, rules of the game allow for the marker to be moved from one zone to another zone in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction, or in a forward but to the right direction, the game includes at least one club suitable for striking the ball, and wherein the club is an actual golf club or a replica of a golf club.

6. A game according to claim 1 wherein the zones are each substantially hexagonal.

7. A game according to claim 1, wherein the zones are each substantially hexagonal, and there is more than one strike wheel, each of which is similar or identical.

8. A game according to claim 1, wherein the zones are each substantially hexagonal, there is more than one strike wheel, each of which is similar or identical, and wherein there are several markers.

9. A game according to claim 1, wherein there is a club for each player of the game.

10. A game according to claim 1, wherein there is more than one club and more than one strike wheel, and rules of the game are such that when the game is played players use one of the clubs to strike the ball of one of the strike wheels, to cause the ball concerned to move in a rotational motion, and wherein the resting place of the ball determines how the player concerned is able to move the marker concerned across the playing surface.

11. A game according to claim 1, wherein there is more than one club and more than one strike wheel, and rules of the game are such that when the game is played players use one of the clubs to strike the ball of one of the strike wheels to cause the ball concerned to move in a rotational motion, the resting place of the ball determines how the player concerned is able to move the marker concerned across the playing surface, and wherein movement of the marker is from zone to zone.

12. A game according to claim 1, wherein at least one of the zones represents a golf green.

13. A game according to claim 1, wherein there is more than one club and more than one strike wheel, and rules of the game are such that when the game is played players use one of the clubs to strike the ball of one of the strike wheels to cause the ball concerned to move in a rotational motion, and the resting place of the ball determines how the player concerned is able to move the marker concerned across the playing surface, movement of the marker is from zone to zone, and some of the zones represent golf hazards and wherein a player who plays onto one of the hazards incurs a penalty.

14. A game according to claim 1, wherein the strike wheel, has two levels of instructions, one level for shots other than putts and one level for putt shots.

15. A game comprising a portable playing surface, the playing surface marked with or otherwise divided into a series of substantially hexagonal zones, a plurality of strike wheels, each strike wheel having a support portion supporting a ball such that the ball can be struck by a club to cause the ball to move in a rotational fashion and then stop, and a plurality of markers for moving across the playing surface, rules of the game dictating that a player must strike the ball using a club to determine where to move based on where the ball stops after being so struck, and that when a player makes a move a marker associated with that player must be moved from one zone to another zone, the rules further dictating that movement of a player's marker from one zone to another zone is in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction, or in a forward but to the right direction.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a golf game. A preferred form of the invention relates to a golf game played on a portable playing surface.

BACKGROUND

It is known to play board games simulating a game of golf. Many known games are not 1 a particularly good representation of the game of golf in that they do not require a player to actually strike a ball or the like with a club. It is an object of at least one embodiment of the present invention to go at least some way towards providing a game which simulates golf and involves a player striking a ball or the like, or to provide the public with a useful choice.

The term “comprising”, “comprises”, or derivatives thereof, if and when used herein, should be interpreted non-exclusively—ie to convey “consisting of or including”.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one aspect of the invention there is provided a game comprising a portable playing surface (eg a mat or a board), the playing surface marked with or otherwise divided into a series of zones, a strike wheel having a support portion (eg an arm) supporting a ball such that the ball can be struck by a club to move the ball in a rotational fashion, and a marker for moving across the playing surface.

The “ball” referred to above may not be an actual ball. In some cases it may be a representation of a ball, for example a circular disk attached to the support portion, etc.

Preferably the game allows for the marker to move from one zone to another zone in a forward direction, in a forward but to the left direction (ie a left diagonal), or in a forward but to the right direction (ie a right diagonal).

Preferably the game includes a club or clubs for striking the ball. In each case the club may be an actual golf club or a replica of a golf club.

Preferably the zones are each hexagonal.

Preferably there are several similar or identical of the strike wheels.

Preferably there are several markers, one for each player of the game.

Preferably there is a club for each player of the game.

Preferably when the game is played players, use the club, or if appropriate one of the clubs, to strike the ball of the strike wheel, or if appropriate the ball of one of the strike wheels, to cause the ball concerned to move in a rotational fashion, and wherein the resting place of the ball determines how the player concerned is able to move the marker concerned across the playing surface.

Preferably movement of the marker is from zone to zone (although not necessarily from one zone to an immediately adjacent zone).

Preferably at least one of the zones represents a golf green and some of the zones represent golf hazards.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Some preferred embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings, of which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a playing surface for a golf game in accordance with the invention, and

FIG. 2 shows detail of some components of the game.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A golf game in accordance with the present invention has a substantially flat playing surface 1 in the form of a board or a mat printed with a series of hexagonal zones 2. In the case of a mat the playing surface may be up to several metres in width and length. Nine of the hexagonal zones represent golf tee-off positions 3 numbered “1” through to “9” to simulate a nine hole golf course. In some embodiments of the game there may be additional golf holes. A central hexagonal zone 4 represents a golf green or finish point which is a common target for each tee-off position 3.

The playing surface 1 is intended for four players but in other embodiments it may be formed smaller or larger to accommodate fewer or more players. A strike wheel is situated at each corner of the playing surface 1. Each strike wheel involves a circular shape 5 divided into segments 6, all of which are marked on the playing surface. The segments are divided into outer bands 6a and inner bands 6b. While not shown in FIG. 1, each strike wheel has a spinner fixed to the centre 7a of each circular shape. One of the spinners 7 is shown in FIG. 2. The spinner 7 comprises an arrow, the head of which incorporates a ball 8. It should be understood that references to a ball include a representation of a ball, for example a round disc or the like. When the game is played a player can strike the ball with a golf club (eg a putter), or a model golf club 9, to cause the arrow to spin about the centre of its circular shape 7. The segment 6 that the arrowhead 10 points to when it has stopped spinning determines the direction in which the player is able to move his or her counter 10 (eg a small coloured disc) across the playing surface 1. In this regard the segments 6 have markings or instructions to indicate the type of move allowable in each case.

In playing the game the four players must each work their way through all nine holes, in each case starting with their counter at the corresponding tee off position 3. Preferably each player moves through the holes in an anti-clockwise direction, using a different strike wheel each time they move from one hole to the next. The counters represent ball markers and players can only move these from hexagonal zone to hexagonal zone in a forward direction. The forward movement may be directly forward, forward left, or forward right, with respect to the hexagonal zone concerned.

To begin play a player takes his or her club and strikes the ball 8 of one of the strike 5 wheels. When the ball 8 stops moving the player observes which of the segments the arrowhead is pointing to and notes this on a score card. Instructions on that segment inform the player where or how the player can move his or her counter. The counter is moved accordingly. The player's next shot must be taken with the arrowhead of the next used strike wheel pointing to the same segment as the last used strike wheel. In taking a shot the ball must complete at least one revolution of the circular shape 5 of the respective strike wheel. Failure to achieve this results in the player incurring a penalty stroke which is recorded on his or her score card.

Each player continues to take shots until the green 4 is reached and the hole 25 completed. At that point the player moves to the start position for the next hole and continues playing until the green is reached for that hole, etc. This is repeated for all of the holes. The player with the lowest number of strokes is the winner.

The moves available to players, ie depending on where the arrowhead 10 points to after each shot, may involve:

    • A top shot”, ie moving the counter three hexagonal zones and scoring one stroke.

Depending on the size of the playing surface and the number of zones, this may involve a “hole in one”. A top shot is achieved when the ball 8 and arrowhead 10 come to rest completely within a segment marked “great shot”

    • A “great shot”, ie moving the counter two hexagonal zones and scoring one stroke. A great shot is achieved if the arrowhead comes to rest within a segment marked “great shot”.
    • A “good shot”, ie moving the counter one hexagonal zone and scoring one stroke. A good shot is achieved if the arrowhead comes to rest within a segment marked “good shot”.
    • A “gone left shot”, ie moving the counter forward but diagonally left by one hexagonal zone and scoring one stroke. A gone left shot is achieved if the arrowhead comes to rest within a segment marked “gone left”
    • A “gone right shot”, ie moving the counter forward diagonally right by one hexagonal zone and scoring one stroke. A gone right shot is achieved if the arrowhead comes to rest within a segment marked “gone right”.
    • A “miss hit shot”. ie not moving the counter but still sowing one stroke. A miss hit shot is achieved if the arrowhead comes to rest within a segment marked “miss hit”

In the event that a player plays a gone left or gone right shot and, if they moved according to the rules for that they would run off the hexagonal zones, then the player is considered to be “in the rough”. The player thus incurs a penalty stroke and must drop back. This may involve a player moving to a last passed drop back point marked on the playing surface.

The rules of the game provide that players should play for the green by taking the most direct route available, subject of course to the other rules.

Some of the zones of the playing surface are designated as hazards. If a player plays into one of these he or she may incur a penalty stroke or strokes. The hazards may be designated “water traps”, “no fishing” zones, “heavy bushes”, or “sand traps”. In addition to receiving penalty strokes, playing onto a hazard may require the player to drop back.

If a player has played onto a hazard he or she may exit this in a fashion dictated by a club driven spin of the ball 8 and arrow 10. For example if in a sand trap, the player can finish the hole by playing a “top shot”, with one stroke added to his or her score, Playing a “great shot” from a sand trap results in a score of one stroke, plus the player may move his or her counter onto the green, but still requires a short putt to finish the hole. Making a good shot from a sand trap scores one stroke and moves the ball onto the green, but still requires a long putt to finish the hole.

When playing onto the green from one of the other zones (ie from the fairway) a player may do a top shot, a great shot, or a good shot. If the player does a top shot the marker is considered to be in the green's hole and the hole is complete. A great shot gets the player onto the green but requires a short putt to complete the hole. A good shot gets the player onto the green but requires a long putt to complete the hole.

When putting the players use the strike wheel, but refer to directions on the inner band 6b of the segments. The outer band 6a of the segments is used for play directions in a non-putting situation. To make a successful long putt the bail 8 must move through at least 180 degrees and finish at a “holed out” position marked on the inner band 6b. Failure to achieve this means that a penalty stroke is incurred and a short putt is required to complete the hole. For a short putt the ball need only move to the nearest “holed out” position marked on the inner band 6b. Missing a holed out position incurs a penalty stroke and requires the player to do another short putt, etc, until successful.

The game may provide for short routes to the green by passing through hazards for certain holes. This may be called “playing Murphy's Way”. To take such routes players must achieve certain shots at predetermined times.

Preferably every hit of the ball scores at least one stroke. Player scores are recorded on score cards as mentioned above.

In some embodiments of the invention the game can be played on a match play basis. In such cases the player with the lowest score for a hole wins that hole. Two game points may be allocated for winning a hole, and one game point for drawing the hole. Players may resign from a hole if they are a certain number of strokes (eg four) over par for that hole.

As described above, the resting place of the ball 8 determines the type of move available to a player. In some embodiments the ball may be struck and move, but on the ball stopping an arrowhead on the spinner at a position remote from the ball points to a segment 6 marked to indicate the move available. In this situation the place where the ball stops should still be taken as determining the move available, that is because the position where the ball stops will dictate where the arrowhead is.

In some embodiments of the invention the segments of the strike wheel are arranged at 5 degree, 10 degree, or 15 degree, etc, intervals depending on the skill level or “handicap” of the player. The strike wheel may or may not have removable covers (eg showing the segment) for use by players depending on their handicap.

Preferably the game involves players moving to a different strike wheel for different holes so as to more closely simulate an actual game of golf. In at least some embodiments of the invention the rules may provide that the strike wheel spinner 7 must rotate at least 360 degrees for tee off or fairway shots, although this may not be necessary for putt shots.

In some embodiments of the invention the playing surface may be arranged so that a forward-left or forward-right stroke always results in a player entering a hazard. The game may be such that every time one enters a hazard a penalty is incurred.

In some embodiments of the invention the game rules may provide that a forward-left or forward-right shot results in a roll back. This simulates a situation where a player has hit the ball onto a sloped area and the ball runs with the incline, ie away from where it landed. For example a forward-left or forward-right shot may result in a player having to move his or her counter back, at least through part of a zone, or otherwise in a less than direct line towards the green.

The game may be played such that playing on to a hazard results in a player having to move his or her counter to the last passed drop back position marked on the playing surface.

In some embodiments of the invention the spin wheel may be colour coded so that it does not contain written designations to indicate which type of shot has been played. For example each segment may have its own colour, some colours representing a top shot, and others a great shot, etc.

The game may be played wherein players can strike the strike wheel so that the spinner moves either clockwise or anti-clockwise. Similarly, players may elect to move through each hole in a clockwise, anti-clockwise, or other manner.

While some preferred forms of the invention have been described by way of example it should be appreciated that modifications and improvements can occur without departing from the scope of the appended claims.