Title:
Pressurized vessel internal material conveying apparatus and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A pressurized vessel configured to convey a material comprises a number of generally rectangular-shaped baffles, each having at least one curved edge coupled to an interior wall of the vessel along a length of the vessel. The pressurized vessel includes a plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles that have at least one curved edge coupled to an interior wall of the vessel. The other edges of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles are coupled to separate generally rectangular-shaped baffles that are oriented at a 45-degree angle from the generally triangular-shaped baffle. The coupling of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles and plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles conveys material within the pressurized vessel, as the vessel is rotated.



Inventors:
Freeman, Jimmy L. (Jasper, AL, US)
Application Number:
11/070524
Publication Date:
09/07/2006
Filing Date:
03/02/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
110/217
International Classes:
F23G5/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RINEHART, KENNETH
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
THOMAS | HORSTEMEYER, LLP (ATLANTA, GA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A pressurized vessel configured to convey a material within the vessel, comprising: a plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles having at least one curved edge coupled to an interior wall of the vessel such that the length of the generally rectangular-shaped baffles at least partially extends laterally along a portion of the length of the vessel; and a plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles each having at least one curved edge coupled to an interior wall of the vessel, the other edges coupled to separate generally rectangular-shaped baffles that are oriented at a 45 degree angle from the generally triangular-shaped baffle, wherein the coupling of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles and plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles conveys material within the pressurized vessel as the pressurized vessel is rotated.

2. The vessel of claim 1, wherein each generally triangular-shaped baffle is positioned perpendicularly to the length of the vessel.

3. The vessel of claim 1, wherein each generally rectangular-shaped baffle includes a flat bar section on a non-curved portion that is perpendicular to the remaining portion of the generally rectangular-shaped baffle.

4. The vessel of claim 1, wherein the pressurized vessel includes a door proximate to an end of the pressurized vessel and a first generally rectangular-shaped baffle within the pressurized vessel coupled to an opposite side of the interior wall of the pressurized vessel from the door.

5. The vessel of claim 4, wherein material deposited into the pressurized vessel is initially moved by the first generally rectangular-shaped baffle toward an end of the pressurized vessel opposite from the door.

6. The vessel of claim 4, wherein the first generally rectangular-shaped baffle is coupled to a first generally triangular-shaped baffle positioned at an angle of 45 degrees from the orientation of the first generally rectangular-shaped baffle, and wherein the first generally triangular-shaped baffle is coupled to a second generally rectangular-shaped baffle positioned at an angle of 45 degrees from the orientation of the first generally triangular-shaped baffle.

7. The vessel of claim 1, wherein the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles and plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles are constructed of steel.

8. The vessel of claim 1, wherein the curved edge of each of the plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles is an arc.

9. The vessel of claim 1, wherein the curved edge of each of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles is an arc.

10. A method for transferring a material within a pressurized vessel from a first end of the pressurized vessel to a second end of the pressurized vessel, comprising the steps of: loading a material into an interior portion of the pressurized vessel proximate to the first end; rotating the pressurized vessel about an axis extending along a length of the pressurized vessel so that a first of a plurality of generally rectangular fins positioned on an interior surface of the pressurized vessel along a portion of the length of the pressurized vessel moves the material in a direction toward the second end of the pressurized vessel; rotating the pressurized vessel so that a first of a plurality of generally triangular fins coupled to the a first generally rectangular fin contacts the material, the first generally triangular fin positioned at a 45 degree angle respective to the first generally rectangular fin; and rotating the pressurized vessel so that the material is moved toward the second end of the pressurized vessel according to an alternating sequence of generally triangular fins and generally rectangular fin coupled at 45 degree angles to the interior surface of the pressurized vessel.

11. The method of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of generally triangular fins are coupled to the interior surface of the pressurized vessel at an angle that is perpendicular to the length of the pressurized vessel.

12. The method of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of generally rectangular fins includes an arced edge that is coupled to the interior surface of the pressurized vessel.

13. The method of claim 12, wherein each of the plurality of generally rectangular fins are positioned to the interior surface at an angle that is not perpendicular to the length of the pressurized vessel.

14. The method of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of generally triangular fins includes an arced edge that is coupled to the interior surface of the pressurized vessel.

15. The method of claim 10, wherein each of the plurality of generally rectangular fins includes a flat bar coupled to a straight edge of the generally rectangular fins forming a tee.

16. A pressurized vessel system configured to convey a material within the vessel, comprising: a cylindrical vessel having a closable opening configured to receive material; a plurality of generally rectangular baffles having an arced edge and positioned at various points on an interior surface of the cylindrical vessel at angles not perpendicular to the length of the cylindrical vessel; and a plurality of generally triangular baffles having an arced edge positioned at various points on the interior surface of the cylindrical vessel perpendicularly to the length of the cylindrical vessel, wherein one or more of the plurality of generally triangular baffles is coupled to a generally rectangular baffle at a first straight edge and a another generally rectangular baffle at a second straight edge so that the first and second generally rectangular baffles are oriented at the same angle respective to a plane of the one or more of the plurality of generally triangular baffles.

17. The method of claim 16, wherein the first and second generally rectangular baffles are oriented at an angle 45 degrees respective to a plane of the one or more of the plurality of generally triangular baffles.

18. The method of claim 16, wherein the first and second generally rectangular baffles are oriented at an angle 60 degrees respective to a plane of the one or more of the plurality of generally triangular baffles.

19. The method of claim 16, wherein the first and second generally rectangular baffles are oriented at an angle 30 degrees respective to a plane of the one or more of the plurality of generally triangular baffles.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to pressurized vessels and, more particularly, to an apparatus and method for conveying material within a pressurized vessel.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

At least one method of generating electricity involves burning coal to generate heat, which transforms water to steam that is then routed under pressure through the turbines that produce electrical energy. After hydroelectric dams, coal-fired power plants represent one of the oldest methods of generating electricity.

The incineration of coal is not a perfectly efficient process, meaning that the effluent from a boiler where coal is burned typically contains chemical agents that are harmful to people and the environment. Agents such as ozone (smog), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, NOx, such as nitrogen dioxide, lead, and particulate soot may be released into the environment through the coal-burning process. In recent years, governments have enacted laws to control and greatly reduce the amount of pollutants such as these that can be released into the environment.

Because of these changes in environmental laws, some types of coal have become disfavored or even barred as fuel options, as the chemical compositions of these coals are such that their incineration actually results in a higher concentration of undesirable chemical agents. For example, some types of coals contain high sulfur content levels, thereby resulting in a much higher release concentration of chemical pollutants such as sulfur dioxide when burned in a coal incinerator. Thus, some of these types of coals cannot be used for at least this reason. So the economic effect on coal mining industries in locations where such undesirable coal is found can be and in some instances has been catastrophic. There is a need then for a process to make these types of fuel available again for combustion in power generation and other applications.

Likewise, a similar issue exists with common garbage. Landfills throughout the world are filling at alarming rates with residential and commercial garbage. With exploding populations and decreasing landfill space, garbage disposal may soon reach crisis levels.

Additionally, disposal of garbage presents a host of environmental issues as well. Even common household garbage may contain harmful liquid and solid chemicals that can damage the environment once deposited in a landfill. Much of today's garbage takes a great amount of time to degrade. A substantial amount of garbage is not even biodegradable, which means that it will forever be in the landfill.

As one solution to the ever-increasing problem of garbage disposal, garbage incinerators have been developed to reduce the massive raw garbage to mere ashes for burial in a landfill. In theory, this concept solves at least the space issue with landfills, as garbage can be incinerated to a fraction of its original size. However, the same problem exists with garbage as with the coal discussed above, and perhaps even more so.

Garbage can be comprised of practically anything, which when burned may actually be more harmful to man and the environment than prior to incineration. Many compositions, whether liquid or solid, release harmful pollutants when burned, thereby limiting the type of materials that may be incinerated at a landfill. But the process of separating materials for incineration is usually difficult and time consuming, which increases the costs of garbage incineration to the point that it is not cost efficient anymore as compared to simply burying materials in the landfill. Plus, human operators may commonly misidentify certain materials for incineration so that harmful materials are unintentionally incinerated, which still results in the release of toxic chemicals, gases, and pollutants into the environment.

Solutions have arisen for treating coal, garbage, and other combustible materials prior to incineration so as to reduce the release of harmful agents during incineration. As one nonlimiting example, materials such as coal or garbage may be treated with chemical compounds under pressure. By mixing the compounds with the material under pressure, the material can be rendered combustible according to government restrictions.

However, a problem exists with vessels that mix the chemical compounds with the materials. Mixing the chemical compounds with the materials added to such vessels is accomplished under specific pressures and for specific durations. If materials are allowed to remain within the vessel for too long or too short a period of time, the resulting material output from the vessel may not posses the desired combustion qualities and characteristics that reduce harmful pollutants into the environment.

Moreover, if the material is not adequately mixed within the vessel, portions of the outputted material may be adequately treated while other portions may not. More specifically, if the material is not stirred or agitated so that all surface areas are exposed to the added chemical compounds, a substantial portion of the material may escape treatment. So there is a heretofore unaddressed need for an apparatus and method for conveying material within a pressurized vessel according to a predetermined manner to enable the treatment of materials therein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Many aspects of this disclosure can be better understood with reference to the following drawings. The components in the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principals, as disclosed herein. Moreover, the drawings like reference numerals that designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

FIG. 1 is an exterior view diagram of the pressurized vessel of this disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a diagram of the pressurized vessel of this disclosure depicting a plurality of internal baffles for conveying material.

FIG. 3. is a diagram of a generally rectangular-shaped baffle from FIG. 2 for conveying the material internally within the pressurized vessel.

FIG. 4 is a diagram of a generally triangular-shaped baffle of the pressurized vessel of FIG. 1 that may be coupled to the baffle of FIG. 3 for conveying a material within the pressurized material.

FIGS. 5 and 6 are diagrams depicting the union of the generally rectangular and triangular-shaped baffles of FIGS. 3 and 4.

FIG. 7 is a diagram depicting an internal view of the pressurized vessel of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 8A-8J are diagrams of the pressurized vessel of FIG. 1 wherein a material is conveyed from one end of the pressurized vessel to another and then back again through out the several views.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Briefly described, a pressurized vessel is disclosed that is configured to move a material internally along the length of the vessel. The pressurized vessel comprises a number of generally rectangular-shaped baffles, each having at least one curved edge coupled to an interior wall of the vessel along a length of the vessel. The pressurized vessel includes a plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles that have at least one curved edge and are coupled to an interior wall of the vessel. The other edges of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles are coupled to separate generally rectangular-shaped baffles that are oriented at a 45-degree angle (as a nonlimiting example) from the generally triangular-shaped baffle. The coupling of the plurality of generally triangular-shaped baffles and plurality of generally rectangular-shaped baffles moves material within the pressurized vessel as the vessel is rotated.

FIG. 1 is a diagram of a pressurized vessel 10 for receiving a material and conveying a material within the pressurized vessel as it is rotated. The pressurized vessel 10 includes a door 14 and seat 15 that may be controlled to open and close for the receipt of materials 16, such as coal or garbage, and also for securing and maintaining pressures with the internal portion of the vessel.

FIG. 2 is a diagram of the pressurized vessel 10 of FIG. 1 with a portion of the vessel removed to show a number of internal baffles. The baffles are coupled to the interior wall of vessel 10 and to the other baffles in such a way so as to create a continuous or semi continuous thread or screw within the interior portion 17 (see also FIG. 7).

In at least one embodiment, the baffles are oriented 45 degrees from each other so that the baffles stretch internally along the interior length of the pressurized vessel 10. As discussed herein and as one of ordinary skill in the art would know, the relationship with the various baffles may be orchestrated at various angles and constructs. More specifically, this disclosure is not limited to the embodiment wherein the baffles are oriented within a relationship of 45 degrees to each other. As discussed in more detail below and as an additional non-limiting example, the baffles may be set at a greater or lesser angle with respect to each other (i.e., 30° or 60°) so as to achieve a different movement operation within the interior space of pressurized vessel 10.

As shown in FIG. 2, pressurized vessel 10 includes a generally rectangular baffle 21 that has a lower edge 22 that is coupled to the interior wall of the rounded pressurized vessel 10 (a portion of which is not shown in this FIG. 2 so as to display the internals of pressurized vessel 10). Stated another way, baffle 21 is coupled to the interior wall of the pressurized vessel 10 at a base and extends outwardly toward a center area of the interior space of the pressurized vessel 10.

The generally rectangular baffle 21 is coupled to a triangular baffle 23. (Baffle 23 is not visible in this diagram; however, please refer to FIG. 3 for additional discussion of this baffle.) Generally triangular baffle 23 is coupled to baffle 25, which is similar in shape to baffle 21.

Baffle 25 is thereafter coupled to generally triangular baffle 27, which is similar to baffle 23 but which is not visible in FIG. 2. This generally triangular baffle 23 is coupled to generally rectangular baffle 28, which is coupled to baffle 31—a generally triangular baffle, as described above. It should be noted that edge 29 on baffle 28 and edge 32 on baffle 31 are coupled to the inner rounded wall of pressurized vessel 10 (a portion of which is not shown so as to depict the internals to the pressurized vessel 10).

Generally triangular baffle 31 is coupled to the generally rectangular baffle 33. This baffle 33 has edge 34 that is coupled to the rounded inner wall of pressurized vessel 10.

As similarly described above, baffles 38 and 43 are generally rectangular-shaped baffles and baffles 35, 41, and 45 are triangular-shaped baffles, which are similar to baffle 31. As also described above, edge 44 on baffle 43 and edge 47 on the generally triangular baffle 45 are coupled to the inner rounded surface of the pressurized vessel 10.

As shown in FIG. 2, the alternating sequence of generally rectangular and triangular baffles forms a screw or thread internal to pressurized vessel 10. Stated another way, the baffles form a continuous thread of surfaces that loop around the internal wall of pressurized vessel 10 from one end to the other.

FIG. 3 is a diagram of the generally rectangular baffle 28, as described in FIG. 1. In FIG. 3, the generally rectangular baffle 28 has surface 52 with a bottom rounded edge 29 and side edge 58. In one non-limiting example, the bottom rounded edge 29 is a continuous arc. As another non-limiting example, this baffle 21 has a flat portion 55 along the top area which may be included to assist in moving the material within the pressurized vessel 10. However, one of ordinary skill in the art would know that this top flat portion 55 may be omitted or that other shapes and/or configurations may be coupled to the generally rectangular baffle 28 so as to move various materials within pressurized vessel 10 in the desired manner.

As shown in FIG. 3, bottom rounded edge 29 is coupled to the interior rounded wall of pressurized vessel 10. The long-straight edge 53 of baffle 28 (opposite rounded edge 29 and coupled to flat bar 55) is proximate to a central region of the interior of pressurized vessel 10. The other rectangular baffles in FIG. 2 are similarly configured.

FIG. 4 is a diagram of the generally triangular-shaped baffle 31 as shown in FIG. 2, with front and side views. In FIG. 4, baffle 31 includes a generally triangular section 61, side edge 64 and bottom-rounded edge 32. In FIG. 4, rounded edge 32 is coupled to the interior rounded walls of the pressurized vessel 10. Just as above, rounded edge 32 may be, as a nonlimiting example, an arc.

As stated above, the internal area of the pressurized vessel 10 includes various generally rectangular and generally triangular shaped baffles coupled to each other so as to form a thread or screw for conveying material within the vessel, as the vessel 10 is rotated. For this reason, the various rectangular and triangular-shaped baffles are coupled to each other at their respective end-sections in an angled fashion so as to create a continuous wall surface within the interior of pressurized vessel 10 that pushes material laterally along the length of pressurized vessel 10.

FIGS. 5 and 6 are diagrams of the relationships of the generally rectangular and generally triangular baffles of FIGS. 3 and 4. In this non-limiting example, generally triangular baffle 31 is shown coupled to the generally triangular baffle 28 of FIGS. 3 and 4, respectively. Baffles 28 and 31 are coupled to each other such that baffle 28 is positioned at a 45-degree angle respective to baffle 31. Edge 29 on baffle 28 and edge 32 on baffle 31 are coupled to the interior wall of pressurized vessel 10.

This 45-degree angle between the baffles 31 and 28 is depicted in a top surface view in FIG. 6. In this diagram, baffle 28 is shown at a 45-degree angle respective to baffle 31. Edges 32 and 29 correspond to the same edges in FIG. 5 so as to more clearly depict the angle relationship of baffles 28 and 31 in FIG. 5.

As indicated above, one of ordinary skill in the art would know that the angled relationship of baffles 28 and 31 (and all additional baffles of the pressurized vessel of FIG. 2) may be adjusted to other angles so as to achieve a different spiral or screw effect in the interior area of pressurized vessel 10. This disclosure is not intended to be limited to a particular angle, as various materials may lead to different angle constructions so as to achieve the desired chemical effect when the materials introduced to chemical reagents for treating as also described above.

As a non-limiting example, the amount of time to treat coal within the pressurized vessel 10 may be a different for treating another material, such as garbage. For this reason, moving material within the pressurized vessel 10 may be done at different rates, which may be accomplished by increasing or decreasing the angled relationship between the baffles, as shown in FIG. 6. By increasing the angle (i.e., to 60°), material is conveyed along the length of the pressurized vessel 10 at a greater rate per rotation of pressurized vessel 10. Likewise, by decreasing the angled relationship of the various baffles (i.e., to 30°), as shown in FIG. 5, material may be conveyed along the length of pressurized vessel 10 at a lesser distance per rotation of the pressurized vessel 10.

FIG. 7 is an internal view diagram of a pressurized vessel 70, which is similar in construction to the pressurized vessel of FIG. 2. However, the pressurized vessel 70 of FIG. 6 includes a greater number of baffles than the pressurized vessel of FIG. 2. In this configuration, the outer wall 71 of pressurized vessel 10 has an internal area for material to be received and travel along its length, as described above. In this diagram, a first generally rectangular baffle 72 is coupled to a generally triangular baffle 74, which is positioned 45 degrees respective to baffle 72. Stated another way, as shown in FIG. 7, the visible surfaces of baffle 72 and 74 have an angled relationship of 135 degrees, which accounts for the 45-degree turn from baffle 72 to baffle 74, as also depicted in FIGS. 5 and 6.

Generally triangular baffle 74 is coupled to a generally rectangular baffle 75, which is again turned 45 degrees from the orientation of the baffle 74. More specifically, the visible surface of generally triangular 74 and the visible surface of generally rectangular baffle 75 have a 225-degree angular relationship, which reflects the 45-degree turn, as also depicted in FIGS. 5 and 6.

In like fashion as described above, baffle 75 is coupled to generally triangular baffle 77, which is coupled to rectangular baffle 79, which itself is further coupled to generally triangular baffle 82. At this point, the internal baffles of pressurized vessel 70 constitute approximately one rotation along the length of the outer shell 71.

From there, generally triangular baffle 82 is coupled to a generally rectangular baffle 84, which is itself also connected to a generally triangular baffle 85. Baffle 85 is then coupled to generally rectangular baffle 88. Generally triangular baffle 91 is coupled to the generally rectangular baffle 88 and also generally rectangular baffle 94. Generally triangular baffle 97 is coupled to generally rectangular baffle 94 and completes a second rotation within the length pressurized vessel 70.

Generally rectangular baffles 101, 107, and 111 are coupled by generally triangular baffles 105 and 109 to constitute at least a portion of a third rotation along the interior length of pressurized vessel 70. Thus, this view shown in FIG. 7, depicts an interior length that may convey material from baffle 72 to baffle 111 as the outer shell 71 is rotated. Each of these baffles are turned 45 degrees from the preceding baffle, as described above.

FIGS. 8A-8J depict various orientations of a pressurized vessel 118 as materials are inserted and moved back and forth within the internal area. In FIGS. 8A-8J, pressurized vessel 118 includes a plurality of generally rectangular and generally triangular baffles as similarly described above, such as shown in FIGS. 2 and 7. One of ordinary skill in the art would know that a pressurized vessel may be constructed with a greater or lesser number of baffles to result in a greater or lesser number of rotations within the internal section of the pressurized vessel 118.

Pressurized vessel 118 of FIG. 8A includes an opening 122 near one end for receipt of material 125, which may be coal, garbage, or any other material desired to be treated within pressurized vessel 118. In this non-limiting example, material 125 is deposited so that it is placed proximate to generally rectangular baffle 128. When loading of material 125 is complete, a door, such as door 14 in FIG. 1, is placed over opening 122 so as to create a pressurized seal for the treatment of material 125. (The door is not shown in this embodiment for simplicity, but one of ordinary skill in the art would know that a door may be coupled to secure opening 122 for maintaining a pressure within the vessel 115.)

In FIG. 8B, pressurized vessel 118 is shown rotated about its length. As vessel 118 is rotated, the baffles move material 125 away from opening 122 and toward the closed end of the pressurized vessel 118. This movement of material 125 agitates the material 125 so that any inserted chemicals or other reagents may interact with material 125 according to a desired recipe of material 125. In a non-limiting shown in FIG. 8B, material 125 is shown approximately between baffles 131 and 134, as pressurized vessel 118 rotates.

In FIG. 8C, material 125 is shown further displaced along the length of pressurized vessel 118 between baffles 136 and 138. This additional rotation of the pressurized vessel 118 results in the lateral movement of the material 125 toward the closed end of pressurized vessel 118. The directional arrow at the end of pressurized body 118 depicts the rotational movement of the pressurized vessel.

FIG. 8D is yet another diagram depicting the continued movement of material along the length of pressurized vessel 118 toward the closed end section. More specifically, material 125 is shown approximately between baffles 142 and 143, as pressurized vessel 118 rotates. Thus, material 125 is shown as having moved along the length of pressurized vessel 118 toward the closed in section.

FIG. 8E shows the completed movement of material 125 to the closed in section of pressurized vessel 118. More specifically, after several rotations of pressurized vessel 118, material 125 is depicted approximately between baffles 138 and 143 as shown. Throughout the various rotations, as described above, material 125 has been agitated and reacted with the inserted chemicals and other reagents, so now pressurized vessel 118 may be rotated in reverse to move material 125 back to the opening 122 for removal.

FIG. 8F is diagram of pressurized vessel 118 rotating in a reverse direction, as shown in 8A-8E. In this non-limiting example, material 125 is shown displaced approximately between baffles 142 and 143. During this time, as material 125 is moved back to opening 122, material 125 may continue to react with inserted chemicals as it is agitated by the baffles of pressurized vessel 118.

FIG. 8G shows material 125 further displaced back toward the opening 122 of the vessel 118. Due to the reversed rotations of the pressurized vessel 118, material 125 is displaced approximately between baffles 136 and 138.

FIG. 8H depicts the continued rotation of pressurized vessel 118 so that material 125 is displaced approximately between baffles 131 and 134. With each rotation of pressurized vessel 118, material moves back along the length of the pressurized vessel body 118 toward the opening 122.

FIG. 8I is a diagram of material 125 that has been moved back the opening 122 along the length pressurized vessel body 118. In non-limiting example, a material 125 has been moved by the baffles to a position that is near baffle 128.

FIG. 8J is a diagram of the pressurized vessel 118 showing the unloading of material 125. In this non-limiting example, the pressurized vessel 118 is further rotated such that opening 122 is along a bottom portion of the pressurized vessel 118. As the material rotates within the pressurized vessel 118, it is expelled through opening 122.

By rotating the entire pressurized vessel with the baffles coupled to the interior walls of the vessel 118, material may be conveyed laterally within the pressured vessel along the length from one end to the other without any internal moving parts. During this of lateral movement of material 125, material 125 may be saturated or otherwise treated with various chemicals and other reagents so as to change the chemical properties of material 125 for further operations, such as incineration as described above.

It should be noted, however, that the relationships of the various baffles within pressurized vessel body 118 may be altered or constructed at different angled relationships so as to move the material 125 along the lateral length of pressurized vessel 118 at different rates per rotation. As also described above, various materials 125 may result in different baffled orientations due to the time desired for chemical reaction between material 125 and other inserted compounds.

It should be emphasized that the above-described embodiments of the present disclosure, particularly, any “preferred” embodiments, are merely possible examples of implementations, merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles disclosed herein. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described embodiment(s) of the disclosure without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the invention. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of this disclosure and protected by the following claims.