Title:
Protective weather-frame canopy enclosure for scaffolding
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A protective canopy framework for a construction enclosure system for use with scaffolding and tubular structures of the type to protect the worker from rain, sleet, snow, and direct sunlight. The unit consists of a base (10) with a plurality of pivoting and sliding attachments including a rear pivoting component (18), a pivoting face plate (20), a sliding-pivoting attachment (26) and a telescoping tube (16) to enable the top member (12) to be adjusted in height. In addition, a telescoping tube (14) will enable said top member (12) to adjust in length as well. The base (10) has a plurality of brace attachments (24) to allow the unit to connect with conventional scaffold bracing for structural stability. A plurality of apertures at the bottom of said base (10) exists to enable the unit to fasten to conventional scaffolding with a standard snap pin (30). A plurality of apertures exists at the top of said base (10) as well, to allow for height adjustability. The said telescoping members (14), (16), have multiple apertures to allow said unit to be locked into place with standard snap pin (30) at a predetermined height and length. The pivoting faceplate (20) is attached to said telescoping tube (14) to allow the unit to connect to a structure or attachment.



Inventors:
Smith, Jeffrey Martin (West Milton, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/348174
Publication Date:
08/10/2006
Filing Date:
02/06/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04G3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BRADFORD, CANDACE L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Jeffrey Martin Smith (Laura, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A canopy framework for a construction enclosure system, comprising: a) a plurality of vertical members pivotably connected to the top mechanism of said canopy framework; and b) a plurality of slidable members movably connected to said top mechanism heretofore enabling a means for vertical and horizontal actuation; c) whereby defining an adjustable cover support frame unit.

2. The canopy framework of claim 1, wherein each said sliding member contains a plurality of apertures within each body such that said members can be fastened into place at a predetermined position.

3. The canopy framework of claim 1, wherein utilizing a plurality of said pivotal members for securing the base of said framework to said top member.

4. The canopy framework of claim 1, wherein at least one of said slidable members possess a movably connected mounting plate.

5. The canopy framework of claim 1, wherein said cover support frame unit provides a means for supporting a protective overlay.

6. A method of at least partially enclosing a structure under construction, comprising: a) providing a skeleton canopy framework for a construction enclosure system according to claim 1; b) rigidly and removably attaching the canopy framework to a temporary platform for supporting workmen during the erection of a building or structure; c) securing the reinforcement members against respective frame members to increase the rigidity of such frame members, thereby defining reinforced members; and d) rigidly securing the reinforced frame members to the brace attachment components such that said reinforced frame members are fixedly retained in a desired spatial relationship with an existing scaffold structure.

7. The canopy framework of claim 6, wherein each said canopy frame unit can be modified providing a means of utilization with multiple applications.

8. A protective scaffold canopy enclosure systems conformed to be position adjacent a building or structure, said system comprising a plurality of horizontally spaced scaffold units each having a pair of vertical legs, a set of brace members rigidly connecting said legs of adjacent said scaffold units, a corresponding plurality of horizontally spaced cover support frames each including a short leg member and a long leg member generally aligned with said vertical legs of the corresponding said scaffold units, each of said cover support frames include a plurality of said brace members respectively connecting to said scaffold units or support frames, also including an inclined top cover support member slidably and pivotably connecting the corresponding said leg members, means for releasably connecting said leg members of each said cover support frame to the corresponding said legs of said scaffold units with said leg members projecting upwardly from said legs, said slidable and pivotable vertical connecting legs of said cover support frame units movably connected enabling the top cover support member to adjust in height and length, whereby defining the adjustable cover support frame units.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a continuation of provisional U.S. patent application filed Feb. 9, 2005 and assigned Ser. No. 60/651,286, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND—FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention relates to a scaffold frame, and more particularly, to adjustable canopy scaffold frame which can be used with conventional scaffolding to form a protective weather enclosure skeleton framework for means of supporting a protective weather overlay to be utilized by workers at construction sites.

BACKGROUND—DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

In the construction industry, it is frequently desirable to protect the workers and the building under construction from the weather. The performance of outside construction work is subject to the weather ranging from precipitation such as rain, sleet and snow to cold and even heat from exposure to direct sunlight. Contractors normally erect scaffolding around the outside of the structure upon which the work is to be performed. Such scaffolding provides support for workmen and tools so that work may be done on the structure at elevated levels. Scaffold enclosures are generally applied to the outside of the scaffolding after it has been erected, to create a weatherproof environment around the scaffold and the structure. Prior art scaffold enclosures have frequently been complicated and cumbersome, and they have required significant expense and time to erect.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,805,816 to Nolte discloses a protective covering for sheltering all sides of a scaffold. A rectangular covering element has hook-shaped telescoping profile bars and clamping lugs on two sides thereof, while the opposite sides have slots for receiving connection cables. Vertically adjacent covering elements are pushed or slipped into each other by means of hook-shaped profile bars which are secured to the edge of each covering element and which telescope into one another. Clamping lugs hold adjacent bars together. Horizontally adjacent cover elements overlap one another and are attached to vertical struts of the scaffold construction by means of individual connection cables fitted through slots and individually tied around the vertical strut. Alternatively, an alligator clip-like cable may be utilized for this purpose.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,121,470 to Stone, et al. discloses a protective covering for scaffolding which utilizes elongated strips of metal and spring-loaded clips for holding the metal strips in place on the scaffolding struts. The metal strips are placed to secure adjacent edges of elongated plastic coverings to vertical and/or horizontal struts. Alternatively, canvas may be used to form the protective covering.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,995,715 to Vertinen discloses a protective covering for scaffolding having a plurality of plastics sheets with bead portions at the edges thereof so that adjacent edges of the coverings are placed together with tubular profiles and pushed over the adjacent edges to encapture the beads and hold the protective sheets in place. The covering is assembled on the ground and lifted by crane to the appropriate height on the scaffolding.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,574,534 to Beaton discloses a tension enclosure system having a plurality of plastic or canvas panels which are mounted on cables connected to the structure. A connector for interconnecting adjacent panels includes an elongated body or rod that extends from the cables that are inserted through a plurality of grommets located on the edges of adjacent panels. A C-shaped clamp may be provided on the rod for holding the rod on the cable. Horizontal safety cables may be threaded through the cables.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,038,889 to Jankowski discloses a scaffold enclosure having a plurality of panels. Each panel has a closure on a first lateral edge for securing that edge to an upright on the scaffolding. The closure can be straps having first and second flaps with hook and loop closures thereon for securing the straps to various sized uprights. Each panel also has fasteners, preferably continuous strips of hook and loop closures on both its inner and outer surfaces at each edge. The panels are thus engageable on one another to form a scaffold enclosure with completely sealed seams.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,799,680 to Dorflinger discloses a canopy system for use when performing outside construction. The canopy is particularly useful on a roof to protect the worker from rain, snow or sun and the canopy system comprises a plurality of adjustable brackets which are secured to the roof in spaced relation to form a desired canopy area, a plurality of rigid canopy support poles secured to the brackets and disposed in a substantially upright position, and a canopy member secured to the upper ends of the canopy support poles.

The prior art scaffold enclosures thus involve complicated systems for erecting the enclosures and may require undo expense, such as hiring special carpentry crews to erect the scaffold enclosure. One prior art scaffold enclosure even requires the use of a crane. Accordingly, there is need for a simpler improved system for forming a protective enclosure for use by workers at construction sites.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

Accordingly, besides the objects and advantages of the Weather-Frame Canopy Enclosure described in my above patent, several objects and advantages of the present invention are:

(a) to provide a Weather Canopy Enclosure System which can be utilized on both commercial and residential construction sites;

(b) to provide a Weather Canopy Enclosure System which will present the ability to make all height and length adjustments from the top of the scaffold structure to accommodate for different building heights;

(c) to provide a Weather Canopy Enclosure System which will conjoin with most conventional scaffold and bracing for safety and structural stability;

(d) to provide a Weather Canopy Enclosure Systems which is compatible with pre-existing conventional scaffolding parts and accessories;

(e) further objects and advantages are to provide a Weather Canopy Enclosure System which can be easily erected to increase productivity and ensure better working conditions in bad weather. Still further objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the ensuing description and drawings.

DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows a side perspective view of the complete weather-frame unit.

FIG. 2 is a rear perspective view of the rear-pivoting component attaching the rear base of the unit to the top member.

FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the complete S-lock brace attachment assembly and the sliding-pivoting attachment as well as various other components.

FIG. 4 is a top perspective view of the pivoting faceplate attached to the telescoping tube-length.

FIG. 5 shows a hinge pin which can be utilized to secure the adjustable weather-frame into place at a predetermined height or length.

FIG. 6 shows a snap pin which can be utilized to lock the adjustable weather-frame into place at a desired height or length.

FIG. 7 shows a gravity tail pin which can also be utilized to secure the adjustable weather-frame into place at a predetermined height or length.

FIG. 8 shows an S-lock brace attachment assembly which is shown in more detail in FIG. 3.

FIG. 9 shows an H-lock brace attachment assembly.

FIG. 10 shows a D-lock brace attachment assembly.

FIG. 11 shows a Q-lock brace attachment assembly.

FIG. 12 shows a W-lock brace attachment assembly.

FIG. 13 shows an X-lock brace attachment assembly.

FIGS. 14 A-B shows an adjustable handle conventionally used with a paint pad which is an example of a different type of pivot that could be utilized in place of the rear pivoting components illustrated in detail in FIG. 2.

FIGS. 15 A-D shows a moveable gage housing which is an example of a ball and socket type pivot that could be utilized in place of the rear pivoting component illustrated in detail in FIG. 2.

FIGS. 16 A-D shows a swivel hinge which is an example of another type of pivoting assembly that could be utilized in place of the rear pivoting component illustrated in detail in FIG. 2.

FIGS. 17 A-D shows a coupling device for the opposed ends of bracelets, which is an example of another type of swivel hinge that could be utilized in place of the rear pivoting component illustrated in detail in FIG. 2.

FIGS. 18 A-C shows a swiveling roll bar, which is an example of another type of swivel hinge that could be utilized in place of the rear pivoting component illustrated in detail in FIG. 2.

FIG. 19 shows a conventional sixty inch wide walk through scaffold frame.

FIG. 20 shows a sixty inch wide step scaffold frame.

FIG. 21 shows a forty-two inch wide step scaffold frame.

FIG. 22 shows a thirty-six inch wide ladder frame.

FIG. 23 shows a twenty-eight inch wide ladder frame.

FIG. 24 shows a coupling or insert pin.

FIG. 25 shows a conventional diagonal scaffold brace.

REFERENCE NUMERALS IN DRAWINGS

  • 10 base
  • 11 gravity pig tail pin
  • 12 top member
  • 13 hinge pin
  • 14 telescoping tube-length
  • 15 H-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 16 telescoping tube-height
  • 17 D-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 18 rear pivoting component
  • 19 Q-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 20 pivoting faceplate
  • 21 W-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 22 roll pin
  • 23 X-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 24 S-lock brace attachment assembly
  • 25 ball
  • 26 sliding-pivoting attachment
  • 27 support member
  • 28 hollow sleeve
  • 29 pivot adjustment
  • 30 standard snap pin
  • 31 ball and socket assembly
  • 32 steel dowel
  • 33 pivot pin
  • 34 bolt
  • 35 lock slot
  • 36 nut
  • 37 lock sleeve
  • 38 washer
  • 39 side lock projection
  • 40 support housing
  • 41 base element
  • 42 swivel element
  • 43 swivel shaft
  • 44 swivel bore
  • 45 reverse rotation stop
  • 46 hinge arrangement
  • 47 ear
  • 48 hinge bifurcation
  • 49 lock assembly
  • 50 hinge
  • 51 swivel spar
  • 52 stationary spar
  • 53 lock
  • 54 handle
  • 55 U-shaped tubular segment
  • 56 sixty inch walk through frame
  • 57 sixty inch step frame
  • 58 forty-two inch step frame
  • 59 thirty-six inch ladder frame
  • 60 twenty-eight inch ladder frame
  • 61 coupling or insert pin
  • 62 diagonal scaffold brace

DESCRIPTION—FIGS. 1 to 25

Referring to FIG. 1 there is shown a scaffold frame having a scaffold base 10, a top member 12 with an inside diameter greater than telescoping tube 14, which has an outside diameter less than the inside diameter of top member 12 making it an inner adjustable member. Likewise telescoping tube 16 has an outside diameter less than the inside diameter of the front vertical leg of base 10 making it an inner adjustable member. FIG. 2 shows the rear leg of base 10 is attached to top member 12 at rear pivoting component 18 with bolt 34, sleeve 28, washer 38, and nut 36. FIG. 3 shows a brace attachment assembly 24 having steel dowels 32 and roll pins 22 used to attached front vertical leg of base 10 to other scaffold frames. A standard snap pin 30 is used to attach and adjust telescoping tube 16 within the front vertical leg of base 10. Such brace attachments 24 and snap pins 30 are available from most scaffold manufacturers and distributors. Sliding-pivoting attachment 26 and bolt 34, sleeve 28, washer 38, and nut 36 to adjoin one end of telescoping tube 16 which is movably connected to top member 12. Sliding-pivoting attachment 26 has an inside diameter greater than the outside diameter of top member 12, allowing for relative sliding movement between the two. FIG. 4 shows that telescoping tube 14, as mentioned, at one end is slidably connected inside top member 12. At the other end of telescoping tube 14 is a pivoting faceplate 20 having bolt 34, sleeve 28, washer 38, and nut 36 attached to telescoping tube 14. FIG. 5 shows a standard hinge pin 13. FIG. 6 shows a standard snap pin 30 as mentioned above. FIG. 7 shows a standard gravity pig tail pin 11. Any of the three pins mentioned could be used to secure telescoping tubes 14 and 16 into place at the desired adjustment. FIG. 8 shows a S-lock brace attachment assembly 24 as mentioned above. FIG. 9 shows a H-lock brace attachment assembly 15. FIG. 10 shows a D-lock brace attachment assembly 17. FIG. 11 shows a Q-lock brace attachment assembly 19. FIG. 12 shows a W-lock brace attachment assembly 21. FIG. 13 shows a X-lock brace attachment assembly 23. Any of the brace attachment assemblies mentioned above could be utilized on the weather-frame unit to permit an attachment to other scaffold frame units. FIGS. 14 A-B shows an adjustable handle conventionally used with a paint pad which is an alternative type of pivoting hinge component with a pivot pin 33 which attaches to the support housing 40 which can be secured into place by utilizing the side lock projections 39 that are connected to lock sleeve 37 which slides into the lock slots 35 at the desired adjustment. FIGS. 15 A-D shows a moveable gage housing which is an example of ball and socket assembly 31 containing a ball 25 and a support member 27 joined together allowing a pivot adjustment 29. FIGS. 16 A-D shows a swivel hinge which is an alternative type of pivoting hinge component that allows base element 41 and swivel element 42 to join together on a swivel shaft 43 with a reverse rotating stop 45 to produce a minimum and maximum hinge adjustment. FIGS. 17 A-D shows a coupling device for the opposed ends of bracelets which is an alternative type of pivoting hinge arrangement 46 that joins the hinge bifurcation 48 to the ear 47 establishing a fulcrum point. FIGS. 18 A-C shows a swiveling roll bar which is an alternative type of pivoting hinge arrangement that consists of a hinge 50 with a stationary spar 52 and a swivel spar 51 joined together with a U-shaped tubular segment 55 that has an attached handle 54 and locking device 53. Any of the pivoting hinge assemblies mentioned in FIGS. 14-18 could be utilized as an alternative rear pivoting component in place of the preferred embodiment shown in FIG. 2. FIG. 19 shows a sixty inch wide conventional open end walk through scaffold frame. FIG. 20 shows a sixty inch wide conventional step frame. FIG. 21 shows a forty-two inch wide conventional step frame. FIG. 22 shows thirty-six inch wide conventional ladder frame. FIG. 23 shows a twenty-eight inch wide conventional ladder frame. FIGS. 19-23 was incorporated into the specification and drawings of this application to suggest that the weather frame canopy unit will be manufactured in multiple shapes and sizes to accommodate for the various types of scaffolding in the industry. FIG. 24 shows a standard coupling or insert pin which is utilized to connect stackable scaffold frame members together vertically. FIG. 25 shows a conventional diagonal brace utilized to connect the scaffold frame members together horizontally. While certain representative embodiments and details have been shown for the purposes of illustrating the invention, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that various changes in scaffolding apparatus and enclosure systems herein may be made without departing from the scope of the invention.

OPERATIONS

The protective weather-frame enclosure is designed for installation at the top of a conventional scaffold assembly by sliding the two vertical legs of base 10 onto the conventional coupling or insert pins of a scaffold end frame and attaching the unit vertically by using standard snap pins 30 or the equivalent through the bottom holes of the vertical legs of base 10 and the holes through the coupling or insert pins. This will create an outer skeleton canopy framework to support the tarps, canvases, etc. and allow the desired area to be temporarily enclosed to protect the worker from undesirable weather.

The unit as shown in FIG. 1 will connect to conventional scaffold and bracing by utilizing the S-lock brace attachment assembly 24 or its equivalent, insuring that the units will have as much strength and stability as the rest of the scaffold assembly for maximum safety.

At the top of the rear vertical leg of base 10 the unit has a rear-pivoting component 18 or equivalent, that enables the top member 12 to swivel, allowing it to raise and lower to desired building heights.

In addition, the unit has a sliding-pivoting attachment 26 directly above the front vertical leg of base 10 that is movably attached to telescoping tube 16 which allows the top member 12 to slide inside while the unit is being raised or lowered. When preferred height is reached telescoping tube 16 can be secured into place by using a standard snap pin 30 or equivalent.

The top member 12 also has a telescoping tube 14 that enables it to extend in length to reach an existing structure, attachment, etc. Telescoping tube 14 can be secured into place by using a standard snap pin 30 or its equivalent, as well.

In addition, telescoping tube 14 has a pivoting faceplate 20, which will allow the unit to be joined to existing structures and/or various attachments.

SUMMARY, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that the present invention provides an adjustable canopy scaffold frame, which can be used with conventional scaffolding to easily form a support frame for a protective enclosure, such as a tarp, utilized by workers at commercial and residential construction sites.

The scaffold frame of the present invention actuates in height and length to accommodate for different building heights, such as freeze board heights and gable ends. Furthermore, the protective weather-frame canopy enclosure has the additional advantages in that

    • it will enable the workers to tarp in and heat or cool down, as need be, the work area quickly, as well as keep it dry, which will ensure better quality and workmanship due to better working conditions in undesirable weather
    • it will save the builder and/or contractors time, money, and manpower during the erection of the scaffolding compared to prior art
    • it will conjoin with conventional scaffold and bracing for structural stability and safety
    • it is designed to utilize conventional parts and accessories such as snap pins, pig tail pins, hinge pins, etc. as well as multiple brace attachment assemblies including S-lock, Q-lock, H-lock, D-lock, W-lock, X-lock, etc.

Although the description above contains many specifications, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but merely as providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the size and shape of the weather-frame could be modified to work with various types of scaffold frames as well as various types of scaffold attachments, etc.

Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.

Thus, having described the invention,