Title:
Stabilizing brace for a window buck
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A system and method for a stabilizing brace for securing a window or door buck to a concrete form. The system and method tightly secures one panel of a window or door buck to a concrete form, so as to maintain the dimensions of an opening defined by the window or door buck when pouring concrete into the form.



Inventors:
Anderson, Audrey E. (Logan, UT, US)
Anderson, Bruce (Logan, UT, US)
Anderson, Justin J. (Logan, UT, US)
Anderson, Thayne (Logan, UT, US)
Application Number:
11/032729
Publication Date:
08/10/2006
Filing Date:
01/11/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04C2/54
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GILBERT, WILLIAM V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP (Denver/SLC) (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A brace for holding one panel of a window buck against a wall forming structure, said brace comprising: an anchoring device having an anchoring end and a coupling end, said anchoring end configured for attaching to said wall forming structure; an extension having a first end, a second end and a length between said first end and said second end, said second end being configured to couple to said coupling end; and a fastener configured to attach to said length at a selected position.

2. The brace of claim 1, wherein said fastener slidably engages said extension at a plurality of positions along said extension to provide a tensional force on said extension.

3. The brace of claim 2, wherein said fastener has an opening for receiving said extension and a rib disposed about the opening to lock said fastener in one of a plurality of positions along said extension.

4. The brace of claim 1, wherein said fastener is coupled to an aperture in said panel and said extension slidably engages said fastener.

5. The brace of claim 4, wherein said extension has a plurality of teeth and said fastener has a lip, said extension slides relative to said fastener in a first direction, wherein said lip and said teeth are configured to impede the movement of said extension relative to said fastener in a second direction.

6. The brace of claim 1, wherein said extension is a substantially rigid member.

7. The brace of claim 6, wherein said extension is manufactured of a nylon polymer.

8. The brace of claim 1, wherein said extension has a plurality of teeth disposed on the surface.

9. The brace of claim 8, wherein said plurality of teeth allow said fastener to slide in a direction of movement parallel to said shaft member from said first end to said second end, while impeding movement in a direction opposed to said direction of movement.

10. The brace of claim 9, wherein said fastener has a lip disposed on an end that engages said extension, wherein said plurality of teeth are configured to allow said lip to pass over a tooth a first time without allowing said lip to pass over said tooth a second time.

11. The brace of claim 8, wherein said extension is a cross-shaped member and said plurality of teeth are disposed on the surface of each L-shaped section.

12. The brace of claim 11, wherein said plurality of teeth are triangle-shaped, angled toward said direction of movement, and said fastener further comprises a cross-shaped lip disposed where said fastener receives said extension, said lip configured to impede movement of said fastener in a direction opposed to said direction of movement when said lip engages a tooth.

13. The brace of claim 1, wherein said fastener is configured to fit into an aperture created in said panel.

14. The brace of claim 13, wherein said fastener has a plurality of ribs that lock said fastener in place within said aperture.

15. The brace of claim 13, wherein said extension slidably engages said fastener and moves in a first direction relative to said fastener, wherein said first direction provides a tensional force on said extension and holds said panel against said wall forming structure.

16. The brace of claim 1, wherein said anchoring device is configured to couple to a reinforcing concrete bar of a concrete form.

17. The brace of claim 1, wherein said anchoring device is a solid member having two lengths, wherein said anchoring end comprises a portion of each length bent at an angle relative to said length to form a hook.

18. The brace of claim 17, wherein said solid member is a metal member.

19. The brace of claim 18, wherein said metal member is a wire member.

20. The brace of claim 17, wherein said anchoring device is a solid member and said solid member bends at said coupling end at an angle sufficient to resist deformation of said two lengths when a tensional force is applied to said coupling end.

21. The brace of claim 1, wherein said anchoring device is a solid member having a hook member on each end.

22. The brace of claim 1, wherein said anchoring device is manufactured of a material of sufficient tensile strength to resist deformation when a tensional force is applied to said coupling end.

23. A brace for holding one panel of a window buck against a wall forming structure comprising: an extension having a first end and a second end; a means for coupling said first end of said shaft member to said panel; a means for coupling said second end of said shaft member to said wall forming structure; and a means for providing a tensional force to said shaft member for holding said panel against said wall forming structure.

24. A brace for holding one panel of a window buck against a concrete form, said brace comprising: an anchoring device having an anchoring end and a coupling end, said anchoring end configured for attaching to said concrete form; an extension having a first end, a second end and a length between said first end and said second end, said second end being configured to couple to said coupling end; and a fastener coupled to said panel, configured to attach to said length at a selected position.

25. The brace of claim 24, said extension slides relative to said fastener in a first direction, wherein said extension has a plurality of teeth and said fastener has a lip, wherein said lip and said teeth are configured to impede the movement of said extension relative to said fastener in a second direction.

26. A method for securing one panel of a window buck to wall framing structure for maintaining the plumb and alignment of the opening created by said window buck during the pouring of concrete into said wall framing structure, the method comprising: coupling an anchoring device having an anchoring end and a coupling end to said wall framing structure; coupling an extension having a first end, a second end and a length between said first end and said second end to said coupling end; attaching a fastener to said length at a selected position.

27. The method of claim 26, further comprising connecting the fastener to said panel.

28. The method of claim 26, further comprising creating an aperture in said panel and affixing said fastener within said aperture.

29. The method of claim 26, wherein said connecting said fastener further comprises slidably engaging said first end of said extension with said fastener, wherein said fastener moves relative to said extension in a direction of movement parallel to said extension while preventing said fastener from moving relative to said extension in a direction opposed to said direction of movement.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. The Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a stabilizing brace and method for stabilizing a window buck or block out in a structure wall such as a concrete form.

2. The Relevant Technology

When constructing a building, it is frequently desirable to position a window, door, garage door, or other opening, in a structure wall such as a poured concrete wall or in a wall made from concrete using a concrete form such as an insulated concrete form. Typically, a window buck or block out (e.g., See U.S. Pat. No. 5,996,293) or door buck or block out is positioned between the sides of the form after which the concrete is poured into the form and about the frame. Therefore, the desired opening is defined in the wall when the concrete hardens or cures. Thereafter, a window structure/unit is placed into the window opening or a door structure/unit is placed in a door opening.

A problem arises when concrete is poured into a concrete form like an insulated concrete form. The weight of the concrete against the window or door buck may cause its shape to twist and contort, thereby changing the plumb and alignment of the opening so that the window or door to be inserted will not fit properly. Braces inside the opening defined by the window buck may be used to stabilize the window buck and to keep it in plumb. However, even then, alignment relative to the concrete form may vary. Further such braces are not flexible but fixed requiring fasteners to hold them in place and in some cases requiring braces to be cut using precise measurements. Multiple workers may be involved with one to hold the buck in alignment while the other installs braces.

In order to increase accuracy and use less labor, it would be desirable to provide a stabilizing brace for a window buck to maintain the dimensions of the opening created by the buck in a wall framing structure and to maintain its alignment relative to the wall or form into which it is being installed such as a concrete form. The brace should be easy to install and be operable by one person to cut down the amount of time and labor required for the installation of the brace and in turn the buck.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a brace for securing a window or door buck to a wall forming structure. The term window buck is intended to include any form or type of block out structure that has sides put into a form. In various exemplary embodiments of the present invention, the stabilizing brace secures one panel of the window or door buck to a form to maintain the desired dimensions of an opening defined by the buck when pouring concrete into the form.

A system and method for a stabilizing brace is provided. The brace includes an anchoring device having an anchoring end and a coupling end. The anchoring end is configured for attaching to the wall forming structure. The brace also has an extension having a first end, a second end and a length between said first end and said second end. The second end is configured to couple to the coupling end of the anchoring device. The brace also includes a fastener that is configured to attach to the length of the extension at a selected position.

The fastener attaches to the shaft member for holding the panel in tension against the wall forming structure, thus keeping the window buck in alignment with the concrete form to maintain the plumb and alignment of the opening. The anchoring device of the present invention is manufactured to facilitate the attachment to the structure of the wall forming structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

To further clarify the above and other advantages and features of the present invention, a more particular description of the invention will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof which are illustrated in the appended drawings. It is appreciated that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a side perspective view of one embodiment of a brace securing one panel of a window buck to an wall forming structure;

FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment of a brace for securing one panel of a window buck to a wall forming structure;

FIG. 3 illustrates a top view of a fastener;

FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective view of a fastener;

FIG. 5 illustrates a side view of one panel of the window buck having the fastener disposed on the surface thereof for securing the extension;

FIG. 6 illustrates a cut away view of a fastener;

FIG. 7 illustrates a front view of an extension;

FIG. 8 illustrates a cut away view of an extension;

FIG. 8A is view looking straight down the shaft of an extension;

FIG. 9 illustrates a front perspective view of another embodiment of the brace for securing one panel of a window buck to a wall forming structure;

FIG. 10 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring device;

FIG. 1 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 12 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 13 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 14 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 15 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 16 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 17 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring end of an anchoring device;

FIG. 18 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring device;

FIG. 19 illustrates a side view of an alternate embodiment of an anchoring device;

FIG. 20 illustrates a perspective view of a securing means for use with the alternate embodiment of an anchoring device illustrated in FIG. 19;

FIG. 21 illustrates a perspective view of a securing means for use with the alternate embodiment of an anchoring device illustrated in FIG. 19;

FIG. 22 illustrates a perspective view of a securing means for use with the alternate embodiment of an anchoring device illustrated in FIG. 19;

FIG. 23 illustrates a perspective view of a securing means for use with the alternate embodiment of an anchoring device illustrated in FIG. 19;

FIG. 24 illustrates a perspective view of a securing means for use with the alternate embodiment of an anchoring device illustrated in FIG. 19;

FIG. 25 illustrates one embodiment of a method in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference will now be made in detail to the preferred and alternate embodiments of the present invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of a brace 125 securing one panel of a window buck or block-out 120 to a concrete form 100. Brace 125 may be discussed here for use with an insulating concrete form. However, it may be used with other kinds of concrete forms. The brace may be adapted for use with a wood or metal frame structure as well.

Insulating concrete forms (“ICF's”) are forms for poured-in-place reinforced concrete walls. In most cases, the forms are left in place permanently to serve as thermal and acoustic insulation and as backing for gypsum boards on the inside and stucco, brick, or other siding on the outside. Concrete form 100 comprises two longitudinally-extending side panels 104, 105 and concrete reinforcement stabilizing bars 110, 115 disposed between each of the side panels 104, 105. Side panels 104, 105 are spaced relative to one another to create the inner concrete core. Concrete is poured between the side panels 104, 105 and about reinforcement bars 110, 115. The concrete cures or dries therein to form the wall. Typically, ICF's have inner concrete cores of 4″, 6″, 8″, 10″, 12″, 14″ or 16″, however, any suitable inner concrete core for the desired wall thickness may be used with the present invention.

A panel section 120 of a window buck is shown secured to concrete form 100. Generally, a window buck creates an opening in a concrete form having specific dimensions for a window, door, etc. Several examples of a window buck and a buck used for a door are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,996,293 and 6,070,375, the disclosure of which are hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes. Panel section 120 illustrated in FIG. 1 is typical for a window buck that is rectangular or square in shape corresponding to a door or a standard window, however, window bucks of varying shapes such as circular, semi-circular or octagonal may be used depending upon the desired shape of the opening. Accordingly, panel section 120 may assume any number of possible shapes or dimensions.

When concrete is poured into the space created between side panels 104, 105, the weight of the concrete may cause the window buck to shift, contort, bend or flex, thus changing the plumb and alignment of the opening. Typically, a window buck or block-out is sized so that a window, door, etc. will fit snuggly into the opening with little finish work. If a window buck shifts or bends during a framing operation, the desired opening is no longer in plumb or aligned so that the window or door unit will not fit in the opening.

Brace 125 holds the buck panel 120 tightly against insulating concrete form 100 to maintain the alignment and plumb of the opening. In operation, a tension is applied to brace 125 to urge the buck 120 against the concrete form 100 to hold it in alignment or plumb. Shims, spacers, or other means may be used to establish desired alignment and plumb. That is, the opening in the form may be off in plum or even in size. In turn, the buck when installed needs to be stable so that it correctly positioned and dimensionally correct to receive the window unit or door unit later. When concrete is poured into the form, panel 120 is held firmly against the form 100 (as adjusted by any necessary shims, spacers or the like) so that the requisite dimensions of the opening formed by the window buck or door buck are maintained.

Referring now to FIG. 2, a perspective view of one embodiment of a brace 126 is illustrated. Brace 126 comprises an extension 140, a fastener 130 and an anchoring device 160. In the illustrated embodiment, fastener 130 is slidably engaged with the extension 140. As such, fastener 130 moves along the extension towards anchoring device 160. In this illustrated embodiment, the fastener 130 is engaged with shaft member 140 so that it cannot be reversed. In effect, it locks on the extension 140. While the preferred fastener 130 with extension 140 is configured to effect a locking function as described, it should be understood that the extension may be formed with a plurality of apertures along its length to receive a pin like device that could even be something like a nail. Clips, clamps or other fastening arrangements may be used so long as they permit the user to establish a tension to urge or hold the panel 120 in place relative to the form 100.

Anchoring device 160 is adapted to connect extension 140 to a structure of the wall or the wall to be formed such as the concrete form 100. It may attach to reinforcement bar 110 shown in FIG. 1. or even to the form itself. Anchoring device 160 has a coupling end 163 and an placement end that includes anchoring ends 161 and 162. In the illustrated embodiment, anchoring ends 161 and 162 are configured as a pair of hooks that are configured to engage the reinforcement bar 110.

In the illustrated embodiment, anchoring device 160 is a single piece of solid material having a first leg 164 and a second leg 165. First leg 164 and second leg 165 are unitarily formed and bent at an angle 166 to be “v” shaped. The angle 166 may be any suitable angle to effect desired spacing between anchoring ends 161 and 162. While the angle may vary between about 5 degrees and about 170 degrees and angle from about 70 degrees to about 110 degrees is preferred with an angle of about 90 degrees being the most preferred.

Anchoring ends 161 and 162 are show formed to attach to the reinforcement bar 110. It may also be formed to attach to others kinds of cross braces. Further, the angle 166 and length of legs 164 and 165 may be selected so that the anchoring ends 161 and 162 engage the form such as the concrete form 100. The anchoring device 160 may be formed of a metal or wire and dimensioned to that the anchoring ends 161 and 162 are spaced apart a distance 167 that is more than the distance 102 between the sides 104 and 105 of the wall 100. Thus the anchoring ends 161 and 162 must be deflected toward each other to place the anchoring device 150 in between the walls 104 and 105. The anchoring ends 161 and 162 are thereupon released and are urged outwardly into the walls 104 and 105 of the form 100 to retain them in a desired location.

Coupling end 163 of the anchoring device 160 is formed of a material that may be plastic, wire, rope, metal ware or the like all selected to resist twisting, bending or warping of legs 164, 165 when a tensional force is applied to end 163. While Anchoring device 160 is typically manufactured of a metal wire, any suitable material may be used that provides a sufficient tensile strength to resist deformation when a tensional force is applied to coupling end 163. Other designs of anchoring device 160 may be used depending upon the particular shape and structure of the particular wall framing structure. FIGS. 10-24 illustrate several alternative embodiments of anchoring device 160.

Referring now to FIGS. 3-6, fastener 130 is illustrated in greater detail. As shown in the top view of fastener 130 of FIG. 3, an opening 136 is provided in the top surface 131 of fastener 130 to receive extension 140. Opening 136 is shown as cross-shaped to receive a cross-shaped extension 140, however, any shaped opening may be used depending upon the corresponding shape of the extension. Fastener 130 has a plurality of lips 132, 133, 134, 135 disposed in the top surface 131. Lips 132, 133, 134, 135 allow extension 140 to pass through opening 136 and move in a single direction in relation to fastener 130. Once extension 140 passes over lips 132, 133, 134, 135, the lips prevent the extension from moving in the opposite direction. Thus, extension 140 is in effect locked in a position relative to fastener 130.

FIG. 4 illustrates a bottom view of fastener 130. As shown, fastener 130 has an opening 136 that extends from the top surface 131 through the bottom surface 137 to allow the extension 140 to slidably engage fastener 130 when it is inserted. Fastener 130 also has a plurality of snap ridges 138, 139 that engage and attach the fastener to an aperture cut into a window buck panel.

As illustrated in FIG. 5, in operation, an aperture 137A is cut into a window buck or block-out panel 120 that is slightly larger than the diameter of bottom surface 137. FIG. 5 has two such apertures, but in practice only one is used. The bottom surface 137 of fastener 130 is pushed through the aperture (like aperture 137A) so that the plurality of snap ridges 138, 139 flex into the interior of fastener 130 and allow fastener 130 to be pushed up to the ridge defining top surface 131. Since the diameter of top surface 131 is greater than the diameter of bottom surface 137 and the hole (like hole 137A) is sized to receive the bottom surface 137, the top surface 131 abuts the inner surface of the panel 120. At the point that fastener 130 cannot be pushed any further into the aperture, snap ridges 138, 139 engage to irremovably position fastener 130 within an aperture of window buck panel 120.

FIG. 6 illustrates a cut away portion of shaft member fastener 130. Lips 133 and 134 are shown that engage the extension 140 to limit travel to a single direction relative to fastener 130. Typically, fastener 130 is manufactured of a polycarbonate such as Makrolon® or Lexan®. However, any material that has sufficient rigidity to inhibit its travel through an aperture like aperture 137A while being flexible enough to have portions to engage teeth or the like may be used.

Referring now to FIGS. 7, 8 and 8A, extension 140 is illustrated in greater detail. As shown in FIG. 7, extension 140 has a first end 141 and a second end 142 and a length 140A between the first end 141 and second end 142. Fastener 130 is configured to couple to extension 140 at a selected position along the length. Extension 140 is illustrated as a substantially rigid member, however, any extension may be used such as a flexible member, a wire, a section of rope, or the like to name a few. Extension 140 is configured to receive fastener 130. For example, extension 140 may be a substantially rigid member formed from nylon or any suitable plastic or plastic-like material. It may also be formed from metals or even be wire or rope. Fastener 130 may be adapted to couple to the extension 140 at a point along its length 140A by a screw, clamp, lock, bolt/nut, pin or similar fastening means. Fastener 130 could even be a knot formed in rope used as extension 140.

In the illustrated embodiment, second end 142 is substantially flat with an aperture 143 disposed therein. Typically, aperture 143 couples extension 140 to the anchoring device 160. Extension 140 has a plurality of teeth 144, 145, 146, 147 that prevent shaft member fastener 130 from moving in a direction towards first end 141 once fastener 130 has been slidably engaged and moved in a direction of movement along the length 140A and towards second end 142.

FIG. 8 illustrates a partial cut away view of extension 140 showing teeth 144, 145 in greater detail. As shown, teeth are generally triangular in shape, angled from first end 141 towards second end 142. Since fastener 130 is manufactured of a material that allows for a little flexibility, lips 132, 133, 134, 135 of fastener 130 will flex slightly and slide over raised tooth 144, for example. The high side of raised tooth 144 prevents lips 132, 133, 134, 135 from passing back over tooth 144. Fastener 130 will, therefore, move in a direction of movement from first end 141 towards second end 142. Once engaged and past at least one tooth, fastener 130 is prevented from moving back towards first end 141. As such, fastener 130 is locked into that position relative to extension 140 with respect to movement parallel to extension 140 in a direction opposite to the direction of movement.

FIG. 8A shows extension 140 from first end 141 looking straight down the shaft towards second end 142. In the illustrated embodiment, extension 140 is depicted as a cross-shaped member with teeth on each L-shaped section, however, any shape such as round, semi-circular with a flat side, semi-circular with a half-cross shape to name a few may be used. Each L-shaped section of extension 140 has a plurality of teeth to engage lips 132, 133, 134, 135 of shaft member fastener 130. The first teeth 148, 149, 150, 151 on each of the respective L-shaped section of extension 140 are shown. Typically, extension 140, including the teeth, is manufactured of a nylon polymer such as Zytel® nylon manufactured by Dupont®, however, any suitable material may be used that has the desired qualities of strength,.

FIG. 9 illustrates an alternative embodiment of a brace 211. As discussed previously, side panels 204, 205 of concrete form 200 adjoin window buck or block-out panel 210. Brace 211 comprises an extension 215, an anchoring device 230 and a fastener 225. Window buck panel 210 has a connecting means 220 for receiving one end of the shaft member 215. Connecting means 220 may be an after market add-on device such as a hook, or the like or it may be manufactured to be integral to window buck panel 210. Connecting means 220 eliminates the need to drill an aperture into the finished side of window buck panel 210 to secure fastener 225, as described previously.

Fastener 225 is coupled to anchoring device 230 in a similar manner as securing a fastener to an aperture in a window buck panel as previously described with respect to FIG. 5. Anchoring device 230 is placed over the wire members of concrete reinforcement stabilizing bar 207 such that a portion of anchoring device 230 hangs over the wire members. Extension 215 is then slidably engaged to fastener 225. Brace 211 is anchored on both the end that is coupled to window buck panel 210 and reinforcement bar 207 of concrete form 200. Tension is created on brace 211 from sliding extension 215 relative to fastener 225 in the direction of movement parallel to extension 215 until it will not slide any further and locks into place. The tension on brace 211 is the force which is acting upon extension 215 when it is pulled tight by forces acting from each end. The tensional force is directed along brace 211 and pulls equally on window buck panel 210 and concrete form 200. In this manner, window buck panel 210 is held rigidly in place with respect to concrete form 200.

FIGS. 10-24 illustrate several alternative embodiments of an anchoring device. FIG. 10 shows an alternate anchoring device having a shaft member 300 with a coupling end 301 and an anchoring end 302. Coupling end 301 is configured as a hook to connect with extension 140 and more particularly, aperture 143. Anchoring end 302 is a larger hook that is configured to connect with a wall forming structure. Shaft member 300, coupling end 301 and anchoring end 302 are manufactured of a material such as metal or plastic that is of sufficient tensile strength to withstand the tensional force applied to the anchoring device.

FIGS. 11-17 illustrate different embodiments of an anchoring end for connecting an anchoring device to the many different structural configurations of a wall forming structure. FIG. 11 shows an anchoring end 303 that is bent at a 900. FIG. 12 illustrates an anchoring end 304 that is curved with a straight length extending downward below the plane of the shaft. FIG. 13 shows an anchoring end 305 having a curved member with a straight length that extends in a direction towards the coupling end at an approximate angle of 45°. FIG. 14 illustrates an anchoring end 306 having a length that extends along the plane of the shaft, a length that extends upwards at a 900 angle and a length that extends back towards the coupling end parallel to the shaft. FIG. 15 shows an anchoring end 307 having a U-shaped member with threads disposed on the end of the member for coupling to a plate 308 and locking nuts 309, 310. FIG. 16 shows an anchoring end 311 having two lengths terminating with a pair of apertures 312, 313 for receiving pin 314. FIG. 17 illustrates anchoring end 315 having a substantially flat portion 316 with an aperture 317 for coupling to a semi-circular shaped member 318 that attaches to the wall forming structure and a pin 319 that locks the member 318 to the structure.

FIG. 18 illustrates another embodiment of anchoring device 320. Anchoring device 320 comprises an anchoring end 322 and a coupling end 323. Coupling end 323 may be a wire, rope, or the like for securing anchoring device 320 to an extension.

FIGS. 19-24 illustrate an alternate embodiment of an anchoring device. FIG. 19 shows an alternate anchoring device having a shaft member 325 with a coupling end 327 and an anchoring end 326. Coupling end 301 is configured as a hook member to connect with extension 140 and more particularly, aperture 143. Anchoring end 326 is threaded to couple to a suitable fastening device. Shaft member 325, coupling end 327 and anchoring end 326 are manufactured of a material such as metal or plastic that is of sufficient tensile strength to withstand the tensional force applied to the anchoring device. FIG. 20 illustrates a threaded nut 328 that connects with threaded anchoring end 326. FIG. 21 illustrates a threaded wing nut 329 that connects with threaded anchoring end 326. FIG. 22 illustrates another threaded wing nut 330 that connects with threaded anchoring end 326. FIG. 23 illustrates a threaded connector that connects with threaded anchoring end 326, connector 331 having a circular length 332 that opens and closes for coupling to a wall forming structure. FIG. 24 illustrates another threaded connector 333 that connects with threaded anchoring end 326.

FIG. 25 illustrates the method of the present invention. Concrete form 500 has a plurality of concrete reinforcement bars 501, 502. A window buck or block-out panel 505 is positioned in an opening formed in the form 500. An aperture 507 is created in panel 505.

A brace is provided that includes a shaft member 515, a fastener 510 and an anchoring device 520. The shaft member 515 is threaded over the anchoring device 520. The shaft member is urged through the aperture 507 to extend away toward the interior of the window buck. Anchoring device 520 is then positioned in the form 500 by preferably hooking to one of the concrete reinforcement bars 501, 502 of the concrete form 500. The end of shaft member 515 not coupled to anchoring device 520 is extending outward from the panel 505. The user puts the fastener 510 onto the shaft 515. The user then desirably checks plumb and alignment using shims and spacers to achieve the desired alignment. The user then pushes the fastener along the shaft 515 until it is in contact with the panel 505 and until the panel 505 is tensionally until snuggly against the form 500. Fastener 510 locks shaft member 515 into place resulting in window buck panel 505 pressing tightly against concrete form 500.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential characteristics. Multiple braces may be used on one panel of a window buck or door buck. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.