Title:
Wick sheet and wick sheet support system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame along the line of an at least one wick sheet and method for making the same are disclosed. The apparatus has a heat and flame resistant container that has an upwardly facing open mouth with a fuel absorbent at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly disposed within the container and retaining the wick sheet within the container. A combustible composition filling the container and substantially saturating the wick sheet is provided, such that the wick sheet is substantially embedded in the combustible composition. The method of making the apparatus can include the steps of providing a flame and heat resistant container and preparing a wick sheet support assembly, including an at least one wick sheet support and at least one wick tab, which are prepared and placed with an at least one wick sheet into the container. The fuel composition can be prepared and placed into the container with the at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly.



Inventors:
Collard, Chris (Deerfield Beach, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/235107
Publication Date:
08/03/2006
Filing Date:
09/27/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
431/325
International Classes:
F23D3/16
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MASHRUWALA, NIKHIL P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Chris Collard (Red Lodge, MT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame along the line of an at least one wick sheet, comprising: a heat and flame resistant container that has an upwardly facing open mouth a fuel absorbent at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly disposed within the container and retaining the wick sheet within said container; a combustible composition filling the container and substantially saturating the wick sheet such that the wick sheet is substantially embedded in the combustible composition.

2. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the container is a removable container.

3. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 2, wherein the removable container is a mold and the at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly and the combustible composition are removable from said mold.

4. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the combustible composition is at least one of a wax, oil, and gel.

5. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 4, wherein the combustible composition is a vegetable based composition,

6. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly support the sustainable flame along a localized area of the combustible composition running along an exposed portion of the wick sheet.

7. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 6, wherein the at least one wick sheet is rectangular and the fuel composition is poured in the container so that the rectangular wick sheet fabric is embedded in the fuel composition and disposed vertically, extending substantially from the bottom of said container to above the surface of the fuel composition nearest the open end of the container such that the portion of the at least one wick sheet that supports the sustainable flame along a localized area of the combustible composition is protruding above the surface and wherein said wick sheet support assembly comprises at least one wick tab and an at least one wick post.

8. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the container is leak proof.

9. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 8, wherein the leak proof container is made of a fire and heat resistant metal, glass or ceramic material and the container further comprises a handle or other carrying means and a lid.

10. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the wick sheet support assembly further comprises a solid disc or solid container bottom with drilled holes for receiving an at least one wick post.

11. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1; wherein the at least one wick sheet is formed from a woven material of at least one of a cotton, paper, and hemp fiber.

12. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the at least one wick sheet is a bundle of fibers or a loosely twisted, braided, or woven sheet, tape, or tube, of at least one of a flammable material and non-combustible material.

13. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 12, wherein the at least one wick sheet is at least one of a soft spun cotton, paper, and hemp element in combination with a nylon or fiberglass material.

14. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 9, wherein the container is a galvanized metal

15. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 14, wherein the galvanized metal is steel or tin.

16. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the thickness of the wick sheet may be between about 1/128th inch and about ¼ inch.

17. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim, wherein the wick sheet is comprised of at least in part of a twelve-ounce weight loosely woven cotton with a thickness of about 1/32 inch.

18. A method of making a portable heat and light source, comprising the method steps of: providing a flame and heat resistant container; preparing a wick sheet support assembly, including at least one wick sheet support and at least one wick tab; preparing and placing an at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly into the container; preparing a fuel composition; and placing the fuel composition into the container with the at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly.

19. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the method step of preparing the wick sheet support assembly further comprises the method step of inserting at least one wick support into at least one wick tab.

21. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the step of placing the at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly further comprises securing the at least one wick tab to a bottom surface of the container.

22. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein in the step of providing a container the container is provided with handles and a lid.

23. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, further comprising the method step of cutting the at least one wick sheet.

24. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the at least one wick sheet that is prepared is comprised of absorbent, woven, braided, knitted, or mesh material comprised of at least one of a cotton, paper, hemp, nylon, and fiberglass material of a square or rectangular shape.

25. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein in the step of preparing and placing the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of cutting the wick sheet and placing the wick sheet such that the height of the wick sheet is slightly higher than the height of the fuel composition.

26. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the step of placing the fuel composition further comprises filling the container with fuel composition such that it fills to a level one-eighth inch to one-quarter inch below the height of the at least one wick sheet.

27. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the step of preparing the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of forming the at least one wick sheet.

28. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 27, wherein the step of forming the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of forming the at least one wick sheet into a tubular wick sheet.

29. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, further comprising the step of modifying the ends of the at least one wick sheet.

30. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 29, wherein the step of modifying the ends of the at least one wick sheet further comprises affixing the ends back to form an enclosed shape or sleeve at the ends of the at least one wick sheet.

31. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, further comprising the step of dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of the fuel composition and allowing it to harden.

32. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 31, wherein the step of dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of fuel composition further comprises dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of melted wax having a higher melting point than the fuel composition being placed in the container.

33. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the method step of preparing and placing an at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly further comprises inserting an at least one wick sheet support into the wick sheet.

34. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 33, wherein the step of inserting at lest one wick sheet support further comprises inserting the wick sheet supports into wick tabs.

35. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 34, wherein the step of inserting at lest one wick sheet support further comprises the method step of affixing the at least one wick sheet support in their respective positions on the wick sheet.

36. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 35, wherein the step of inserting at lest one wick sheet support further comprises the method step of affixing the wick tab to the container.

37. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 36, wherein the method step of affixing the wick tabs further comprises gluing, soldering, or spot welding.

38. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 36, wherein the method step of affixing the wick tabs further comprises providing a solid container base or a disk with pre-drilled cavities and affixing the solid container base or disk to the container.

39. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein in the method step of providing the container, wherein the container is a removable container and further comprising the method step of releasing the removable container and removing the fuel composition, wick sheet, and wick sheet support assembly from the container.

40. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, further comprising the method step of hardening the fuel composition and removing the fuel composition together with the wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly from the container.

41. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the week sheet support structure comprises an at least one wick tab and an at least one wick post.

42. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 41, wherein the at least one wick tab is a single container bottom or disk with several pre-drilled holes for inserting a plurality of wick posts.

43. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 41, wherein the at least one wick tab and at least one wick post are a plurality of wick tabs and a plurality wick posts.

44. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 41, wherein the at least one wick post is made of a combustible material.

45. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 44, wherein the combustible material is wood.

46. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 1, further comprising the step of chemically treating the at least one wick sheet.

47. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the at least one wick sheet forms a geometric shape or a straight line or a combination of geometric shapes utilizing the at least one wick sheet.

48. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 27, wherein the step of forming the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of forming the at least one wick sheet into a geometric shape or a straight line or a combination of geometric shapes utilizing the at least one wick sheet.

49. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 18, wherein the method step of preparing and placing an at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly further comprises the steps of punching into the bottom of the container an at least one cylindrical-shaped, sealed hole protruding downward to a depth of one-eighth to one-half inch and a diameter slightly wider than the at least one wick post and inserting an at least one wick post into these holes.

50. The method of making a portable heat and light source of claim 36, wherein the method step of affixing the wick tabs further comprises the method steps of providing a solid disc, punching pre-drilled tab holes in the disc, affixing the solid disc to the base of the container or providing the bottom of the container with pre-drilled tab holes, and sealing the disc or bottom with/and the wick tabs inserted into the pre-drilled holes.

51. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 1, wherein the wick sheet support assembly is incorporated into the container.

52. The portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame of claim 51, wherein the wick sheet support assembly further comprises an at least one strip incorporated into the container with an at least one sharpened edge affixing the at least one wick sheet.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the priority of U.S. provisional patent application 60/647,936, filed Jan. 31, 2005, which is incorporated herein by reference.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a wick sheet used in combination with a wick movement limiting structure embedded in a wax candle. The wick sheet when ignited makes sustainable horizontal flames along the lateral line(s) of the exposed wick on the surface of a wax candle. The wick sheet can be arranged in an unlimited variety of configurations providing heat, light and viewing entertainment to the user.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Most outdoor candles, such as the popular citronella candle device sold in department stores, similar to, for instance, the candle of U.S. Pat. No. 3,285,694 to Marchi, comprise a bucket, typically containing paraffin wax scented with citronella oil and employing one to three round cord or string-like wicks. The flame from this type of device burns only in a localized area around the string-like wick(s) providing relatively low amounts of heat and light and does not spread laterally across the candle surface. The appearance of the simple flame(s) from such devices is boring compared to the flame from, for instance, a wood fire, which some outdoorsmen refer to as “cowboy TV”.

One way of achieving a more complex, interesting candle with greater heat and light output is through a wick sheet instead of a string-like wick. Although rectangular shaped wick sheets have been used extensively in oil lamp systems, both in straight sheets and in the form of a tube, such as those shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,720,260 and 4,836,773 to Yamaguchi, few if any have been utilized in wax-based candles. Nor have they been provided with wick support structures that limit the movement of the wick sheet, while self-adjusting to the level of the fuel, as is necessary for operation in a wax based system. This is especially true of these oil based systems, which typically utilize manual wick sheet adjustment, usually through a mechanical control, to adjust the flame and wick height in the system and, therefore, need an adjustable, limited wick system without the support aspects typically used in a wax system. Thus, this type of system does not perform well in a solid wax medium. In addition the mechanism protrudes above the oil surface, which is unattractive in a wax based system.

Additionally, the wicks in these oil burning systems are typically produced by knitting a band of wick cloth having at least a burner part that is made of non-combustible textile material. This limits the wick sheet in many ways, as the sheets must be thicker and will generally burn hotter. Thus the oil burning wick sheet fabrics described in these systems are thicker, do not completely burn, and would burn dangerously hot if applied in a wax fuel composition producing flare ups, where the entire wax surface may ignite, which is not only hazardous, but also consumes wax at such a rate as to render a wax candle with such a thick wick economically undesirable to the average consumer.

Attempts have been made to provide portable burners. However, none of these have provided satisfactory controllable burning systems of wax candle systems. They are generally directed to portable fire systems that burn quickly and across there entire surface to ignite a fire similar that provided by a sterno can. One such device is provided in U.S. Pat. No. 3,367,758 to Ambrose, et al. The Ambrose device provides for a burner with wax and a burnable container. The device shown is designed to create an uncontrolled conflagration across the entire surface of the wax, consuming both the wax and the container. To this end, the design does not provide for a wick sheet nor does it provide for a wick sheet support structure. Specifically, a wick sheet or wick sheet support structure that would provide for a controlled, area specific burn and prevent the conflagration across the entire surface of the system, as controlling the wick level or position as the burning composition is consumed is unimportant in this type of design.

Additionally, there are numerous portable devices and fuel compositions which are designed to provide a convenient fire without the problem of gathering wood or other fuel and continuously feeding it to the fire. For instance, the ready to use campfire shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,967,769 to Thompson, comprising woodchips embedded in a mineral spirits and paraffin wax mixture, and includes an unsupported paper spiral-shaped wick. However, this type of flame smells of chemicals, burns quickly and with a significantly higher flame than any similar wax candle. Additionally, the paper wick sheets provided are prone to burning or setting alight substantially the entire surface of the device, leading to an uncontrolled burn that consumes the fuel at a maximum rate. Further, the wicks provided are not supported or retained, allowing for movement of the wick material as the combustible material is quickly consumed None of these instant campfire type devices utilizes significant wick support structures.

Further, although wick tabs employed in this wick sheet and wick sheet support system invention have been utilized in previous single, string-like wick devices, none have been provided in a wax based wick sheet system. For instance, a wick support base is provided in U.S. Pat. No. 1,344,446 to Engman. However, the device of Engman holds a string-like wick to the bottom of a candle; this limits the candle to the single, string-like wick. Moreover, these string-like wick anchors do not incorporate wick support structures or posts.

There exists a need to provide a portable heat and light source that provides a controllable and entertaining flame that issues from a wick sheet that is securely held within a fuel composition.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the instant invention is to provide a novel wick sheet and wick sheet support structure in combination with a fire resistant portable wax filled container.

In another aspect, the present invention's wick sheet fabric and supporting posts can be arranged in unlimited shapes and designs to create unlimited flame configurations along the surface of the wax composition once assembled and lit.

In still another aspect, the present invention comprises a unique wick movement-limiting structure which holds a wick sheet upright in a solid or liquid fuel composition.

A further object of the present invention to provide a candle device which provides a greater amount of light, heat and “flame entertainment” than a typical outdoor citronella candle.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an outdoor candle, or fireplace candle, which is safely contained, readily extinguishable, and does not emit dangerous sparks, while still providing the desirable heat and flame entertainment of a campfire.

A still further object of the invention is to utilize an at least one wick tab to hold a solid support post to the bottom of a candle in conjunction with a wick sheet.

In still another aspect, the present invention is a new combination of ingredients, including in an exemplary application a soy based, cleaner burning wax in combination with a wooden wick sheet support structure and a principally cotton based wick sheet to provide a novel, portable, ready-to-use candle.

Yet a further object of the invention is to provide a wick sheet with wick material that can be both fully flammable or incorporate both a flammable and a non-combustible composition.

The apparatus of the invention includes a portable apparatus producing a sustainable horizontal flame along the line of an at least one wick sheet, having a heat and flame resistant container that has an upwardly facing open mouth, a fuel absorbent at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support structure disposed within the container and retaining the wick sheet within said container, and a combustible composition filling the container and substantially saturating the wick sheet such that the wick sheet is substantially embedded in the combustible composition.

The container can be a removable container. For instance the removable container can be a mold, like a candle mold or other portable flame producing apparatus mold. The at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support structure and the combustible composition can be made removable from the mold. The combustible composition cane be at least one of a wax, an oil, and a gel. The combustible composition can be, in one exemplary embodiment, a vegetable based composition.

The at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support structure can support the sustainable flame along a localized area of the combustible composition running along an exposed portion of the wick sheet. The at least one wick sheet can also be rectangular and the fuel composition can be poured in the container so that the rectangular wick sheet fabric is embedded in the fuel composition and disposed vertically, extending substantially from the bottom of said container to above the surface of the fuel composition nearest the open end of the container such that the portion of the at least one wick sheet that supports the sustainable flame along a localized area of the combustible composition is protruding above the surface.

The container can also be leak proof. The leak proof container can be made of a fire and heat resistant metal, glass or ceramic material. The container can be a galvanized metal. The galvanized metal can be steel or tin. The container can also have a handle or other carrying means and a lid. The at least one wick sheet can formed from a woven material of at least one of a cotton, paper, and hemp fiber. The at least one wick sheet can also be a bundle of fibers or a loosely twisted, braided, or woven sheet, tape, or tube, of at least one of a flammable material and non-combustible material. The at least one wick sheet can be at least one of a soft spun cotton, paper and hemp in combination with a nylon or fiberglass material, for instance.

The thickness of the wick sheet may be between about 1/128th inch and about ¼ inch. For instance, the wick sheet can be comprised, at least in part, of a twelve-ounce weight loosely woven cotton with a thickness of about 1/32″.

The method of the invention includes a method of making a portable heat and light source having the method steps of providing a flame and heat resistant container, preparing a wick sheet support assembly, including at least one wick sheet support and at least one wick tab, preparing and placing an at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly into the container, preparing a fuel composition, and, placing the fuel composition into the container with the at least one wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly.

The method step of preparing the wick sheet support assembly can include the method step of inserting at least one wick support into at least one wick tab. The step of placing the wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly can include securing the at least one wick tab to the bottom surface of the container. The step of providing the container can include providing the container with handles and a lid.

The method can further include the method step of cutting the wick sheet. The wick sheet that is prepared in the method can be comprised of absorbent, woven, braided, knitted, or mesh material comprised of at least one of a cotton, hemp, paper and fiberglass material of a square or rectangular shape. The step of preparing and placing the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of cutting the wick sheet and placing the wick sheet such that the height of the wick sheet is slightly higher than the height of the fuel composition. The step of placing the fuel composition further comprises filling the container with fuel composition such that it fills to a level one-eighth inch to one-half inch below the height of the at least one wick sheet.

The method step of preparing the wick sheet further includes the step of forming the wick sheet. This can be one of any number of shapes or a straight line or a combination of shapes and any number of wick sheets. The step of forming the at least one wick sheet further comprises the step of forming the at least one wick sheet into a tubular wick sheet. The method includes the step of modifying the ends of the at least one wick sheet. The step of modifying the ends of the at least one wick sheet further includes affixing the ends back to form an enclosed shape or sleeve at the ends of the at least one wick sheet.

The method can further include the step chemically treating the wick sheet. The method can further include the step of dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of the fuel composition and allowing it to harden. The step of dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of fuel composition further includes dipping the at least one wick sheet in a bath of melted wax having a higher melting point than the fuel composition being placed in the container.

The method step of preparing and placing an at least one wick sheet and the wick sheet support assembly further includes inserting an at least one wick sheet support into the wick sheet. The step of inserting at lest one wick sheet support further comprises inserting the at least one wick sheet supports into wick tabs. The step of inserting at least one wick sheet support further includes the method step of affixing the at least one wick sheet support in their respective positions on the wick sheet. The step of inserting the at least one wick sheet support further comprises the method step of affixing the wick tab to the container. The method step of affixing the wick tabs can further include gluing, soldering, or tack/spot welding.

The method step of securing the wick support posts can also include the method step of punching into the bottom of the container cylindrical-shaped, sealed holes protruding downward to a depth of one-eighth to one-half inch and a diameter slightly wider than the wick post(s), the bottom portion of the wick posts are then inserted into these holes. The method step of affixing the wick tabs can also include the method step of providing a solid disc or false bottom, punching pre-drilled tab holes in the disc, and affixing the solid disc to the base of the container or providing the bottom of the container with pre-drilled tab holes. The disc and base can be sealed and made leak proof. The disc may be inverted then inserted and sealed with the wick tabs inserted into the holes.

The method step of providing the container can include providing a container that is a removable container and the method can further include the step of removing the fuel composition, wick sheet, and wick sheet support assembly from the removable container. The method can also include the step of hardening the fuel composition and removing the fuel composition together with the wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly from the container.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of exemplary embodiment of the instant invention employing a tubular wick sheet system.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the instant invention of FIG. 1 revealing the wick sheet and wick sheet support system prior to adding the wax.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of a single wick support post of the exemplary embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view showing another exemplary embodiment of the wick sheet system with the front section of the container cut out and prior to adding the wax.

FIG. 5 shows a cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of the instant invention.

FIG. 6 shows a cross-sectional view of an alternative embodiment for supporting the wick posts of the instant invention.

FIG. 7 shows a cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of the instant invention prior to adding the wax.

FIG. 8 shows a top view of the embodiment of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a flow chart detailing a process of making an exemplary embodiment of the instant invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of exemplary embodiment of the instant invention employing a tubular wick sheet system. An exemplary embodiment of the present invention is shown in perspective and it comprises a leak proof, fire resistant container 1 with carrying means or handle 2, and lid 3. The embodiment shown in FIG. 1 is shown after the fuel absorbent tubular wick sheet 5, which is supported and held in place by wick posts 4, in this case eight wick posts, has been ignited so that flames 6 rise above the burning wick sheet. The wick sheet system is embedded in a fuel composition 7, in this case soy wax. A steady flame height from a ¼″ to 4″ or more can be achieved. In this embodiment of the invention, the container 1 is a metal cylindrical pan with the open mouth 8 being circular and having a diameter of about 16″. The diameter of the container may practically vary from about as low as 4″ to as much as 24″ or more. The container size is a matter of choice depending the desired size, shape, and duration of flame, and variations in these variables are well within the scope of the invention as understood by one of ordinary skill in the art. Although perspective views of the invention are shown here, the candle works best when used on a level surface and prudent fire safety precautions are followed.

The support surface or bottom of the container 9 is leak proof in this exemplary embodiment. The container height in this embodiment is about 4″ but can be between 2″, or lower to 12″ or greater. The wick sheet 5 is embedded in the wax composition 7 extending vertically from the bottom of the container to the top of the surface of the fuel composition and, in the exemplary embodiment shown, above the surface. The wick sheet 5 typically protrudes above the surface of the fuel composition 7 with at least an edge in a position where it may be readily ignited. The fuel composition 7 fills the container to within about 1″ of the rim of the mouth 8 in the exemplary embodiment being described. The wick sheet 5 functions in absorbing the fuel composition and producing a continuous flame across the entire exposed surface of the wick sheet 5.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the instant invention of FIG. 1 revealing the wick sheet system prior to adding the wax. The exemplary embodiment of the instant invention is shown with the front of the container 1 cut along line A-A to show the wick sheet 5 and wick sheet support structure assembly 16 inside the container prior to pouring the fuel composition into the container 1. The wick sheet 5 in this exemplary embodiment comprises a flat, rectangular, woven cotton fuel absorbent fabric wrapped around the outside of eight wick support posts 4 and sewn or stapled together 10 at each end of the wick sheet 5 to form a tubular shaped wick sheet 5 perpendicular to the bottom surface of the container. The exemplary embodiment shows wick sheet 5 attached to each wick post 4 in this embodiment by a metal staple 12. Any suitable affixing mechanism may be used. The wick sheet 5 is rigid enough to stand upright in a hot liquid wax bath or similar fuel composition with the added support of wick support posts 4. This wick sheet 5 and wick sheet support assembly 16 resemble a fence, with the force of contact friction with the posts, and the sheets own rigidness holding the wick sheet 5 upright.

The wick sheet support structure or assembly 16 limits the movement of the wick sheet and, in the exemplary embodiment shown, is comprised of one or more wick posts 4 that are held in place by one or more wick tabs 4a. The wick tabs 4a are held to the bottom of the container by an affixing method 4b. This can be for instance, but is certainly not limited to, spot welding, tack welding, soldering, gluing or other affixing methods. In the exemplary embodiment shown, the wick posts 4 are held in wick tabs 4a that are held at the bottom of the container 1 by spot welding 4b the metal wick tabs 4a to the surface of the bottom of container 1. This configuration is engineered to prevent unintentional wick movement and promote maximum and consistent burn while in a solid or liquid wax fuel composition. The fuel composition 7 can be for instance, but is certainly not limited to, a wax, an oil, a flammable gel, or the like. In the exemplary embodiment shown, the fuel composition 7 is a soy wax. In this embodiment, the wick sheet 4 is pre dipped in a bath of higher melt point wax, for example a wax having a melting point of about 140 degree F. or above, and is allowed to harden prior to filling the container with the melted soy wax. The wick sheet 4 has holes 11 cut out to allow even distribution of a fuel composition 7, such as the soy wax, during the initial pouring of the fuel composition 7 and during the combustion of the fuel composition 7, for instance when the wax melts during burning.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of a single wick support post of the exemplary embodiment of the instant invention. In an exemplary embodiment, the wick support posts 4 comprise a wooden dowel that is inserted into a metal wick tab 4a and held together by the contact friction of the wood dowel tightly fitted and compressed inside the hollow wick tab 4a neck. The wooden dowel is one of a number of materials that can be used to provide a combustible support post that burns with the wick sheet. Additional non-limiting examples can include for instance paper, cardboard and other substances that are combustible. Additionally, non-combustible materials, for instance metals or ceramics, are also contemplated. The posts may also be made integrally with the wick tabs or they may be incorporated into the container as well. The wick support post 4 height should be approximately equal to the height of the wick sheet 5.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view showing another exemplary embodiment of the wick sheet system with the front section of the container cut out and prior to adding the wax. In this further exemplary embodiment, the configuration of the wick sheet 5 and wick support assembly 16 is shown extending laterally in a straight line across the container 1, to more resemble a tennis net-like wick system, in an oblong container 1. The cross-cut in the figure has been made to reveal the inside of the container prior to pouring in the fuel composition. The lateral ends of the wick sheet 5 in this embodiment have been folded over and sewn 13 back to the wick sheet 5 to form vertical sleeves 14 into which the wick support posts 4 are inserted. The wick sheet 5 has holes 11 and is stapled 12 to the wick support posts 4 in a manner similar to the previous exemplary embodiments. The two wick post tabs 4a are attached to the bottom surface of the container by spot welding 4b as in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 2. When lit, the device of FIG. 3 provides an even line of flame along the exposed portion 15 of wick sheet 5 that protrudes from the fuel composition 7.

FIG. 5 shows a cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of the instant invention prior to adding the wax. As with previous embodiments a wick sheet 5 with sewed sleeves 14 at each end. Wick support posts 4 are inserted into each sleeve 14. The wick sheet 5 in this embodiment is provided with a particular curved z or s-shaped wick sheet. This shape is non-limiting, any variety of shapes that would be pleasing to the eye can be provided for with the wick sheet. As shown in previous embodiments, this can be further modified by the addition of multiple wick sheets, to provide any number of possible configurations that may be pleasing to the eye. The wick sheet 5 and wick sheet support assembly 16 are contained in an oblong metal container 1, which can be for instance 4″ high×14″ long, 8″ wide. Though not shown, a fuel composition 7 similar to that of previous embodiments is provided within the container 1. The fuel composition fills the container 1 partially, leaving a small space at the top. This can for instance be, but is not limited to, about ¾ of the way to the top of the container 1. Additionally, a portion of the wick sheet 15 extends above the top surface of the fuel composition 7. This can for instance be, but is not limited to, a portion of wick sheet 15 about ¼ in. exposed above the fuel composition 7 surface. An at least one wick tab 4a is provided, here shown with four wick tabs, which retain the wick sheet support posts 4 inserted into their necks. The bottom of the at least one wick tab 4a is secured to the bottom of the container by a securing method 4b.

FIG. 6 shows a cross-sectional side view of another embodiment of the instant invention. The wick posts 4 are secured to the container 1 by cylindrical, sealed holes 17 which have been punched into the bottom surface and are incorporated in the container 1. Also the container 1 has a bottom metal rim 18 which rest on the ground surface. The wick support posts 4 are inserted into the holes 17 and held there by gluing or contact friction.

FIG. 7 shows a cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of the instant invention prior to adding the wax. In this embodiment the at least one wick sheet 5 is held upright by wick sheet holding strips 19, which can be prefabricated so as to be incorporated into the inside wall of the container 1, or may simply be provided by any suitable conventional manner, at both lateral ends of the wick sheet 5. The wick sheet 5 is held by, in this exemplary embodiment, four punched clasps 20, which are prefabricated and that have sharp edges on the inside of each strip which when the wick sheet 5 is sandwiched between the strips 19 and squeezed together on opposite sides, they cut slightly into the wick sheet 5 holding the wick sheet 5 upright and laterally tight like a tennis net. The wick sheet holding strips 19, in the exemplary embodiment, are shown, but certainly not limited to, as being the same height as the wick sheet 5 and have a width of ½ inch, but can be from ⅛ inch to as much as 2 inches wide, and is approximately the same thicknesses as the container wall. This embodiment does not require the wick support posts 4 and wick tabs 4a. The wick sheet holding strips 19 may be incorporated into the wall of the container as an extension of the wall itself after the seam and then folded over, or as two separate sheets attached to the inside wall by tack weld, spot weld, solder, rivet, or other method that is leak-proof.

FIG. 8 shows a top view of the embodiment of FIG. 7. The wick sheet 5 is held upright by wick sheet support strips 19 are incorporated into the inside wall of the container 1 at both lateral ends of the wick sheet 5. The wick sheet 5 is held by, in this exemplary embodiment and is certainly not limited to this example, by the four punched clasps 20 that have sharp edges on the inside of each strip that are extensions of the inside wall of the container after the wall weld 21, though the clasps may be located at any point on the container. The wick sheet is sandwiched between the extended container wall sheet metal and the existing inside wall of the container 1 as shown.

FIG. 9 is a flow chart detailing the process of making an exemplary embodiment of the instant invention. The process for making an exemplary embodiment of the instant invention comprises the method steps of providing a container 1000 made of, for example, metal, glass, ceramic, or the like, which is flame and heat resistant. The size and shape of the container can vary widely according to the desired flame size, configuration, and duration. Metal, or galvanized metal is the most readily available. Steel or tin is generally the lowest cost suitable metallic material. This steel is usually low carbon type and its cost is such that the container can be readily recycled, reused for other purposes, or disposed of after the composition has been consumed. Handles and a lid are preferred, but optional. The disposal of said container would present a reduced environmental hazard.

Yet another step in the method of assembly for the exemplary embodiment of the instant invention is preparing and placing a wick sheet and wick sheet support assembly within the container 2000. Several additional or optional steps may proceed or precede this step. For instance, the wick sheet can be cut prior to providing it in step 2000. The wick sheet, which is typically comprised of absorbent, woven, braided, knitted, or mesh material, preferably made of, but not limited to, cotton, paper, hemp, nylon or fiberglass woven fabric, can be cut or made in any shape. In the exemplary embodiments shown a square or rectangular shape is provided. The container may be a permanent container, similar to existing bucket type candles, or may be a non-permanent container, such as a mold or similar device to be removed prior to operation. In an exemplary embodiment, the wick sheet may be trimmed or sized so as not to exceed the height of the container, adding to the stability of the flame in windy conditions. Similarly, the shape and size of the desired flame, and subsequent configuration of the wick posts, along with the shape and size of the container will be some factors in determining the horizontal length of the wick sheet or sheets. For a tubular wick sheet, as shown in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 1, in a 16″ diameter container, the diameter of the wick sheet tube is about 12″. Care should be taken not to have too much exposed burning wick because the high temperature from such a flame could cause the entire fuel composition surface to ignite, which burns the fuel at a higher rate, thus reducing burn time and diminishing the economic advantages of the instant invention. The wick thickness may be varied according to the desired flame size, burn rate, and heat output. The wick sheet fabric type and thickness selection will be sensitive to the shape, size, wax, color, and fragrance of the embodiment. Twelve-ounce weight loosely woven cotton with a thickness of about 1/32″ is depicted in the exemplary embodiments of the instant invention shown.

Additionally, after the wick sheet is cut to the desired length and height, in a further step the ends of the wick sheet can be modified. For example, they may be sewn or stapled together for an enclosed shape, such as in FIG. 1, or each lateral end is folded and sewn or stapled to form open ended sleeves for the wick support post(s) to slide into, as shown in FIG. 4. Next, the wick sheet can be dipped in a bath of fuel composition, for instance a melted wax, and then allowed to harden. The wick sheet supports, which can be made of any rigid rod-like material, can then be inserted into the hollow cylindrical neck of some metal wick tabs, which have about the same diameter of the post to insure a snug fit. The wick sheet can then be stapled, fastened or sewn to each wick post in positions corresponding to the predetermined desired configuration and spacing of the wick posts in the container.

A further step in the process is the method step of securing the bottom of the wick tabs to the bottom of the container 3000 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The method step may further comprise inserting the bottom of the wick sheet support posts into at least one wick tab, the wick tab having a neck the same diameter or slightly wider than the wick sheet support posts. The base of the wick tab is secured inside the container by a fixing method, for instance, through heat tolerant gluing, soldering, spot welding, tack welding or any other method that does not dissolve in hot fuel composition.

Yet another method of securing the wick posts to the bottom of the container is by inserting the posts into pre fabricated leak proof cylindrical cavities 26, which are approximately ⅜ inch in depth, and of a diameter equal to or slightly wider than the posts. The cavity or cavities protrude downward from the container bottom shown in FIG. 6. The bottom of FIG. 6 may be the actual bottom or a false bottom, for instance a solid disk with the cavities drilled therein. The drilled holes can be made with inverted, sealed, or capped, wick tabs 4a inserted into the hole so that the bottom surface of the wick tab rests flat on the container bottom surface, and is then glued, welded, or secured by any other method which insures a leak free container bottom. The bottom ⅜ inch of the wick posts are then fitted into the cavity and secured by glue or friction tension.

The wick posts can be made of any rigid preferably non-toxic material capable of maintaining an upright vertical position in a hot fuel composition. In the exemplary embodiments, the wick sheet support posts top parts burn down equal to the wick sheet level. Wick posts made of metal, or other non-combustible material can be used as well and allow for an easily reusable candle container, while wooden dowel posts burn above the wax surface along with the wick material providing a more natural candle appearance. The width of the wick posts can vary from 1/16 of an inch to 1 inch with a height equal to the height of the wick sheet fabric. With the wick posts securely in place and the wick sheet pulled taught between each supporting post as in FIGS. 2 and 4. In a further step 4000 the fuel composition is put into the container. Further steps for cooling the instant invention and disengaging the instant invention from a container or mold can be added.

The embodiments and examples discussed herein are non-limiting examples. The invention is described in detail with respect to exemplary embodiments, and it will now be apparent from the foregoing to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from the invention in its broader aspects, and the invention, therefore, as defined in the claims is intended to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit of the invention.