Title:
Jewelry organizer with cushioned pads and strips
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The uniqueness off this present invention to the art is the detachable, cushioned pads and strips, along with the use of loop and hook fasteners. This uniqueness enables the jewelry lover to view, organize, retrieve, and replace jewelry effortlessly. This present invention is a compact jewelry organizer. Its design is to store numerous pairs of earrings, necklaces, bracelets, bangles, pendants, and rings while utilizing a minimal amount of space. This container is compact, and permits a view of all jewelry at a glance without having to finger through different containers or compartments.



Inventors:
Roberts, Stephanie Regina (Chattanooga, TN, US)
Application Number:
11/344482
Publication Date:
08/03/2006
Filing Date:
01/31/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45C11/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
NEWAY, BLAINE GIRMA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Stephanie Regina Lee (Apopka, FL, US)
Claims:
1. A beautiful compact jewelry organizer designed to securely store numerous pairs of earrings, necklaces, bracelets, bangles, pendants, and rings. Jewelry is viewed at a glance, and is easily retrieved. Detachable cushions make organizing, retrieving, and replacing jewelry easy.

2. Earring cushions are used to store earring without the risk of entanglement of earrings. Earrings such as post-type with clasp, clip-on, hook, and lever back are kept on an earring cushion. Earrings are worn on the earring cushion much like earrings are worn on the human ear.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

I CLAIM THE BENEFIT OF EARLIER PROVISIONAL APPLICATION NUMBER: 60/649,005—FILED ON Feb. 1, 2005.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

NOT APPLICABLE

SEQUENCE LISTING

NOT APPLICABLE

BACKGROUND FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention relates to the problem of organizing, selecting, displaying, and storing jewelry. Numerous attempts for improvements have been made with diverse containers such as compartmented boxes, padded trays, and hanging apparatuses. Prior art has proved to be cumbersome and awkward to work with for those who house numerous jewelry pieces.

DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

There have been countless attempts to invent an apparatus that fulfills the need of storing and organizing jewelry. Prior art in this field has been cluttered with an incalculable amount of jewelry boxes and other storage devices. Prior inventions have failed to alleviate the inconvenience and clutter of storing numerous pieces of jewelry in a user-friendly manner.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,474,466 to Barahona (2002) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,121,833 to Lindsay, et al. (1992) and U.S. Pat. No. 4,923,069 Germain et al. (1990) show devices that hold a plurality of pairs of earrings, as present invention. Although said prior art holds a plurality of pairs of earrings, it handles awkwardly, and is impractical for daily use. Earrings are generally stored in drawers and compartments of jewelry boxes or jewelry organizers. U.S. Pat. No. 5,692,605 Lai (1997), an example of a jewelry box with a compartment commonly used for storing earrings. Storing earrings in drawers or compartments, as such, creates clutter, and an opportunity for the earrings to entangle. It is also frustrating, as well as time consuming to dig and finger through drawers and compartments looking for earrings or other jewelry pieces.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGE

Hence, besides the objects and advantages of the pads and strips already mentioned, several objects and advantages of this invention are:

    • (a) to provide a beautiful jewelry organizer in which to store a numerous pairs of earrings, without the risk of entanglement of earrings.
    • (b) to provide a way to view the display of earrings, and other jewelry at a glance, without the searching and fingering through a drawer or compartment.
    • (c) to provide a user friendly way of retrieving and replacing earrings by detaching earring cushions.
    • (d) to provide an easy way of organizing jewelry by placing earring, ring, and strip cushions in a desired arrangement.

Further objects and advantages are to: 1) effectively utilize less area of space than is commonly required to house a jewelry collection of the average jewelry lover, and 2) to have the ability to display a collection of jewelry in a well planned, user friendly, lustrous manner.

DRAWINGS

In the drawings, closely related figures have the same number but different alphabetic suffixes.

FIG. 1 is a perspective front view of 2 cloths, with 2 strips of hook fastener on each cloth.

FIG. 2 is a perspective inside view of an empty, wooden box with an attached opened door covering.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the said opened wooden box in FIG. 2. The wooden box is lined with the said cloth in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 4A to 4C shows various aspects of an earring cushion.

FIGS. 5A to 5D shows various aspects of a cushion strip.

FIG. 6 is a perspective front view of the said box in FIG. 2, with said cloth in FIG. 1, said earring cushion in FIG. 4, and said cushion strip in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective closed-front view of the wooden box in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a perspective back view of the wooden box in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a ring cushion strip with rings.

REFERENCE NUMERALS IN DRAWINGS

    • 11 inside lining cloth
    • 12 inside hook fastener strip
    • 13 door lining cloth
    • 14 door hook fastener strip
    • 15 inside base of wooden box
    • 16 length side of box
    • 17 width side of box
    • 18 door
    • 19 hinge
    • 20 earring cushion
    • 21 eyelet
    • 22 earring loop fastener patch
    • 23 earring pad
    • 24 cushion strip
    • 25 strip pad
    • 26 strip loop fastener patch
    • 27 strip loop fastener
    • 28 strip hook fastener
    • 29 ring cushion strip
    • 30 bracket

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective front view of 2 lining cloths 11 and 13. The lining cloths are made of velvet or felt type of fabric. Each lining cloth 11 and 13 has 2 strips of hook fastener 12 and 14 sewn to it. The lining cloths 11 and 13 are permanently attached to the inside base 15 and bottom-side of door 18 of the wooden box in FIG. 2, as demonstrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the wooden box, before the lining cloths 11 and 13 have been applied. The door 18 of the box is opened to the left side of the inside base of wooden box 15. The inside lining cloth 11 is attached to the inside base of wooden box 15, and the door lining cloth 13 is attached to the bottom-side of door 18. The dimensions of said box are bout 8½″×15×½. A bracket (FIGS. 7 and 8) that allows the angle of box to be adjusted suspends the said box.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the wooden box after the lining cloths (FIG. 1) have been applied to the bottom-side of door 18 and the inside base of wooden box 15. The earring cushion(s) 20 and cushion strip(s) 24 are attached after the lining cloths have been permanently applied to box.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an earring cushion.

The earring cushion 20 is constructed with 2 pieces of satin type fabric that encloses an earring pad 23 (FIG. 4B) to create a cushion. 2 Eyelets 21 are placed about ¼ of an inch above the bottom edge of the earring cushion 20. The earring post type, hook, or lever back goes through the eyelet 21 and the clip-on type clip on the eyelet 21. Earrings are worn on the earring cushion 20 much like earrings are worn on ears.

The earring cushion 20 has a loop fastener patch 22 sewn to the back of it (FIG. 4B), which allows the earring cushion 20 to be detachable. For storing, organization and display purposes, the earring cushion (FIG. 4) attaches to any spot on either hook fastener strip 12 or 14, which is sewn to a lining cloth 11 or 13.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the cushion strip. Necklaces, bracelets, and bangles, are kept in a cushion strip 24. The cushion strip 24 is constructed with 2 pieces of satin type fabric that encloses a strip pad 25 (FIG. 5A), to create a cushion. The cushion strip 24 has a loop fastener patch 22 sewn to the back of it (FIG. 5B), which allows the cushion strip (FIG. 5B) to be detachable. The cushion strip 24 hangs by a hook fastener strip 12 or 14.

The cushion strip 24 has loop fastener sewn along the length of the front of it (FIG. 5A), and hook fastener along the length of the back of the cushion strip 24 (FIG. 5B). The bottom of the cushion strip (FIG. 5B) is rolled upwards to the adjusted size; then hook fastener on the back of cushion (FIG. 5B) is allowed to lock with the loop fastener on the front of cushion strip (FIG. 5A).

FIG. 6 is a perspective front view of a utilized jewelry organizer with cushioned pads and strips. Illustration with earring cushion(s) 20 with earrings, and cushion strips 24 containing necklaces, bracelets, and bangles. Ring cushion strip(s) 26 are filled with rings.

Operation

The manner of utilizing the jewelry organizer is unlike the use of prior art jewelry boxes and jewelry organizers. After selecting the jewelry item at a glance the user will pull an earring cushion from the jewelry organizer to remove a pair of earrings or pendant, and then replace the earring cushion. The user will detach the roll of a cushion strip to remove a necklace, bracelet, or bangle, then re-roll and attach. The user will detach the roll of a cushion strip to remove a ring from a ring cushion strip, then re-roll and attach.

(1) The user, facing jewelry organizer, will open the door of wooden box (FIG. 7) to the left. Once the door 18 (FIG. 7) is opened the jewelry in the jewelry organizer is displayed (FIG. 6). The view in FIG. 6 shows the jewelry stored on the inside door, and the inside base of box 15. Thus, making use of all space inside the jewelry organizer.

(2) FIG. 6 also shows the earring cushions 20 in use. Earring cushions 20 wear earrings much like the human hear does. Earrings such as the post type, lever backs, and hooks go through the eyelet 21 like going through holes of pierced ears. One or more pairs of earrings are worn on an earring cushion 20. The earring cushions 20 illustrated in are wearing one pair of earrings. Clip-on earrings are clipped on top of the eyelets 21. Earring cushions 20 have loop fastener patches 22 (FIG. 4B) sewn on back of them that attaches to and detaches from the hook fastener strips 12 and 14.

(3) Necklaces, bracelets, and bangles are housed on a cushion strip 24. Close all clasps and hooks on said jewelry and place the circle of the jewelry on the end of cushion strip 24 (FIG. 5C). Then pull the strip up towards the top of the cushion strip and stop at adjusted size, and attach the strip hook fastener 28 (FIG. 5B) located on the bottom-back of cushion strip to the strip loop fastener 27 (FIG. 5A) located on the front of cushion strip. This forms a secure hold (FIG. 5D) that houses necklaces, bracelets, and bangles.

(4) Rings are placed on a ring cushion strip 29. The circle of the ring is placed on the end of the ring cushion strip 26. Then pull the bottom-end of the ring cushion strip up, towards the top of the cushion strip and stop at adjusted size and attach the strip hook fastener 28 (FIG. 5B) located on the bottom-back of cushion strip to the strip loop fastener 27 (FIG. 5A) located on the front of cushion strip. This forms a secure hold (FIG. 9) that houses rings. The ring cushion strip 29 is identical to the cushion strip 24 (FIG. 5A-5C), except for the width of the strip is smaller.

(5) The sole purpose of the use of brackets 30 (FIG. 7 and FIG. 8) is to demonstrate that some apparatus, not holding to a bracket, is used to support this present invention.