Title:
Fireplace wings tile setting aid
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A tile setting and installation tool is disclosed that allows for easier setting of tile marble or stone above the opening of a fireplace. The tool consists of an elongated member with a magnet located on the back of the member. The magnet attracts and temporarily holds onto a metal firebox to allow spacing and support for the tile marble or stone that is placed above the opening in the fireplace. The ends of the elongated member are thinned to the width of the grout spacing between the tiles to insure uniformity of tile marble or stone being placement or set. The tool may also included a level to verify orientation of the tile.



Inventors:
Scarpine, Matt (Temecula, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/346871
Publication Date:
08/03/2006
Filing Date:
02/02/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04F19/00; F24B1/198
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080271387High-Frequency Measuring Hangar for Measuring Large Test ObjectsNovember, 2008Fritzel et al.
20020062625Access floor panel and systemMay, 2002Foden
20050102962Timber blockMay, 2005Mcinerney et al.
20090084051Residential Building of a Secondary DevelopmentApril, 2009Korolev
20060277849Auxiliary escalation unit for bed escalatorsDecember, 2006Mizuno
20070079567Grid system for building structure and method thereforApril, 2007Leslie
20090107055CONTAINERIZED ACCESS CONTROL SYSTEMApril, 2009Slagel
20090188198ROOF DITCH MOLDING RETAINERJuly, 2009Scroggie et al.
20090277115Device and a Process for Producing Insulated Siding PanelsNovember, 2009Hobbie
20040258869Modular plastic flooringDecember, 2004Walker
20090260305TRAILER, WALL CONSTRUCTION AND MANUFACTURING METHODOctober, 2009Haub et al.



Primary Examiner:
SMITH, RICHARD A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MATT SCARPINE (TEMECULA, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A fireplace tile setting aid comprising: an elongated base member with at least one magnet placed on at least a portion of at least one side of the elongated member to attract the elongated base member to a metallic surface of a fireplace.

2. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 1 further includes at least one elongated wing located on at least one far end of the elongated base member.

3. The elongated wing from claim 2 where in the elongated wing provide for grout spacing.

4. The at least one magnet from claim 1 wherein the magnet is of a type consisting of Neodymium Iron Boron, Samarium Cobalt, Alnico, Ceramic, Ferrite or something other than Neodymium Iron Boron, Samarium Cobalt, Alnico, Ceramic, Ferrite.

5. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 3 wherein one side of the elongated wings is one width an opposite side of the elongated wings are a different width.

6. The at least one magnet from claim one where in the magnet is a long strip magnet that is bonded to most of the elongated base member.

7. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 1 wherein tile setting aid provides support to hold tiles that will be placed above the tile setting aid.

8. The tile setting aid from claim 1 further includes a level.

9. The elongated base member from claim 1 elongated base member is between 24 and 48 inches long.

10. The elongated wings from claim 2 where in the elongated wings are between 3 and 12 inches long.

11. A fireplace tile setting aid comprising: a magnetic elongated base member wherein the magnetic elongated base member attracts to a metallic surface of a fireplace to aid in the placement of tile marble or stone around the fireplace.

12. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 11 further includes elongated in wings located on the far ends of the elongated base member.

13. The elongated wings from claim 12 where in the elongated wings provide for grout spacing.

14. The at least one magnet from claim 11 wherein the magnet is of a type consisting of Neodymium Iron Boron, Samarium Cobalt, Alnico, Ceramic, Ferrite or something other than Neodymium Iron Boron, Samarium Cobalt, Alnico, Ceramic, Ferrite.

15. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 13 wherein one side of the elongated wings is one width an opposite side of the elongated wings are a different width.

16. The at least one magnet from claim one where in the magnet is a long strip magnet that is bonded to most of the elongated base member.

17. The fireplace tile setting aid from claim 11 wherein tile setting aid provides support to hold tiles that will be placed above the tile setting aid.

18. The tile setting aid from claim 11 further includes a level.

19. The elongated base member from claim 11 wherein the elongated base member is between 6 and 48 inches long.

20. The elongated wings from claim 12 where in the elongated wings are between 3 and 12 inches long.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority to provisional application serial No. 60/648,735 filed Feb. 2, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in apparatus for installing tile and marble on a fireplace. More particularly, the present invention relates to a magnetically backed tile setting gauge that will magnetically attach to a metal firebox to more easily allow setting of tile and marble in a straight manner above the firebox.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is popular to use floor tiles on fireplace surrounds. Supporting these tiles over a fireplace opening during the installation process can be quite difficult or just time consuming. Setting the floor tile around a fireplace consists of placing tile on the sides of the fireplace. The tiles that extend up the sides of the fireplace are called the legs. The last step of installing tile around a fireplace requires some type of support so the tile placed above the fireplace don't slip down creating an uneven surface while the tiles dry. It is common for installers to use masking tape, wood or anything one would find on the job site to support the tiles during the drying process, often this is ineffective. An ideal tool would create a bridge from the sides or legs over the top of the fireplace to support the tile while they set.

The prior art discloses many examples of apparatus to aid in the setting of tile and marble on vertical surfaces and more particularly a fireplace, but none providing the combination of features disclosed and claimed herein.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,367,227 issued Apr. 9, 2002 to Veyna discloses a tile setting rack. The rack consists of two vertical and one or more horizontal member's that surrounds the fireplace to form a bridge. Tile or marble is placed on the horizontal member(s) to support the tile above the fireplace opening. A marker clip is also provided on the top member(s) to ensure the tile is evenly spaced. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set above a fireplace it requires multiple pieces, does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox and does not include a grout spacer between the tiles set beside the vertical section of the firebox and the tiles set above the firebox.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,263,260 issued Nov. 23, 1993 to Smith discloses a tile leveler and tile setting aid for use with tubs and fireplaces. The device consists of spring-loaded telescoping members that expand to hold the tile level or against the walls of a tub. The device may also be secured to the wall with nails tape or other temporary retaining means. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set above a fireplace it requires multiple pieces, does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox and does not include a grout spacer between the tiles set beside the vertical section of the firebox and the tiles set above the firebox.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,583,343 issued Apr. 22, 1986 issued to Camp discloses a tile setting kit. The kit consists of suction cup tile spacing devices and a horizontal cross member with uniformly spaced cross teeth. The kit allows uniform spacing of the tile on vertical surfaces. The device also provides a level to ensure or horizontal placement of the tiles. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set on a vertical surface it requires multiple pieces, and does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,744,141 issued Jul. 10, 1973 issued to Strickland Sr. disclose a tile setters' gauge for use on verticals surfaces such as tubs. The device consists of multiple pieces that are expanded or pressed up against the sides of a tub to ensure the tiles are set in a horizontal level line. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set on a vertical surface it requires multiple pieces, does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox and does not include a grout spacer between the tiles set beside the vertical section of the firebox and the tiles set above the firebox.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,941,404 issued Nov. 12, 1931 issued to C. B. Lansing disclose a tile setting machine or level. The level consists of a horizontal member with a bubble level and a blade or spacer that is placed between rows of tiles to ensure the spacing between the tiles is consistent. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set on a vertical surface it requires multiple pieces, and does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox.

Pending Application publication No. 2002/0050107 published May 2, 2002 for Barkowski discloses stone and ceramic trim units that have been preset onto a backing member. This invention allows quick and horizontal setting of tile stone or marble on to and around a firebox. No tools or fixtures are required except for the backing member that is preset to onto the tile stone or marble pieces prior to installation. While this invention makes it easier to support tiles that are being set on a vertical surface it requires multiple pieces, does not magnetically attach to a metal firebox and does not allow for variations in the tile spacing.

What is needed it is a simple to use tile and marble setting device that can easily be attached to a metal firebox with a magnet or similar attach and method. The ideal device would also provide uniform spacing of the rows of tile be simple to install and remove and consists of very few pieces. The device may also be made in varying widths or provided with spacers for different grout widths. Additional features may include a level such as a bubble laser type as well as or other tile setting aides. The proposed device satisfies these needs.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to aiding in the installation of tile marble or stone above the opening of a fireplace. The device consists of an essentially elongated member that temporarily magnetically attaches to the face of a metal fireplace. The ends of the member have thin blades that sit on top of the tile marble or stone that are present on the sides of the fireplace. The thin blades provide spacing for grout that will be applied after the tile marble or stone sets. After the stone tile or marble has been placed and bonds to the fireplace the device can be removed and used at another location.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a simple to install and remove tile marble or stone setting tool were the tile marble or stone is to be placed above a metal fireplace.

Another object of the invention is to provide uniform spacing between the tiles that are set above a fireplace.

Another object of the invention is to provide support for tile is marble or stone placed above a metal fireplace to prevent the tile marble or stone from sagging as the tile marble or stone bonds to the fireplace wall.

Another object of the invention is to provide a temporary magnetic attachment of the device to a metal firebox so that tool can be applied and removed without marking the wall or the fireplace.

Another object of the invention is to provide shims wedges or other support that can be used with the invention to provide for different widths of grout.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a level or similar mechanism to indicate that the tile has been placed in an orthogonal orientation.

Various objects, features, aspects, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention, along with the accompanying drawings in which like numerals represent like components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a modified frontal view of tool.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the tool cutting through the bubble level and the magnets.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the tool cutting through a wing.

FIG. 4 is a modified front view of the tool being used to set tile on a fireplace.

FIG. 5 is a detailed view of the tool being used to set tile.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the tool being used to set tile.

FIG. 7 is a view of an alternative embodiment of the tool where it is constructed from multiple extendable pieces.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a fireplace wing tool 10 shown in one embodiment. The tool consists of an elongated member 20. The elongated member and can be made from a number of different materials including but not limited to plastic,, ferrous, and nonferrous materials. The tool may be fabricated by machining welding extruding bending or other manufacturing processes. In the preferred embodiment, the tool is fabricated as a hollow aluminum extrusion. In this embodiment, the center-elongated member is approximately 1″×1″ square and about 3 feet long. While the tool is described here in approximate dimensions and shape, the tool may be a made in a variety of sizes and or shapes that can accomplish the desired result. On one side of the tool magnets 50 and 55 are shown attached to the side. It is also contemplated that the entire tool be fabricated from a ferrous material and magnetized, so the tool is a magnet that would attract to the metal fireplace.

The magnets are attached to one or more sides of the elongated member as shown in FIG. 1. Magnets may also be attached to the opposite side of the elongated member. The magnets are attached to the elongated member with adhesives or other forms of bonding that ensure the magnets will stay in place. In the embodiment shown, two magnets are used on opposite sides of a bubble type level 60. Prototypes of the tool have been fabricated with a bubble level, but other types of level indicators can be used that include but are not limited to laser, inclinometer and water levels. There are two magnets shown in FIG. 1 on the sides of the level, but the bubble level may be deleted and a single magnet may extend across the side of the tool. While a strip magnet is shown and used in the preferred embodiment, multiple round or rectangular magnets may placed along the side of the tool to perform the same function.

Various types of magnets may be used in on the side of the tool; these different types of magnets may include but not be limited to Neodymium Iron Boron (NdFeB or NIB), Samarium Cobalt (SmCo), Alnico, Ceramic or Ferrite. In the preferred embodiment of magnets used is a ceramic type that is fabricated in a thin adhesives backed strip that can be easily applied and adhered to the tool.

On each side of the center elongated member recesses 40 and 42 show a reduction in the thickness of the tool. The reduced area is called the wing(s) of the tool. In this view, the reduction is shown as curved arcs, but the reduction may take various shapes including an abrupt step change, linear transition, or minor steps from the thin to the thick portion of the member. This figure shows two wings 30, one on each side, integrated into the center member. These wings support the tool on the tile marble or stone that is placed up the sides of the fireplace, in addition they support the tile marble or stone that is placed above the tool. The thickness of the wings are any thickness such as 1/16, 1/8, 3/16, 1/4″ or any thickness where the grout will be placed. The length of the wings can also vary depending upon the tool or the size of the tile or marble being placed, but generally the wings are between 3 and 12 inches long, but could be shorter or longer than the dimensions provided. The function of the wings will be described in more detail in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6.

Refer now to FIGS. 2 and 3 there is shown a cross sections of the tool. In FIG. 2, the cross section cuts through the center of the tool where a bubble level 60 is shown. The bubble level is a curved tube that indicates when the tool is horizontal then the bubble is at the highest point 62 of the tube. In this figure the top portion 34 of the tool is identified. The top portion of the tool is basically a flat straight surface where tiles can be placed on top of to ensure they are straight and will not sagging as the tiles bond to the wall and or fireplace box. Magnet 50 and is also shown in this figure. FIG. 2 shows a cross section cutting through one of the wings of the tool. In this figure, item 34 identifies the top part of the tool and items 32 and 36 represent two different thicknesses of the wing. Each of these thicknesses corresponds to a thickness of grout that will be placed between adjacent tiles. The wing may consist of a single thickness where shims or other spacers may be placed between the wings of the tool and the tiles to create a different spacing for grout.

Refer now to FIG. 4 there are shown the outside of a metal fireplace box 70, as it would appear installed in a house or building. When the tile marble or stone is placed on the wall around the fireplace box they are first placed on the ground or hearth in front of the fireplace. Tiles are then placed up the wall until the tile is above the opening 80 in the firebox. The tiles are set so they span across the space between the wall and the metal fireplace box. These tiles 100, 102 are placed vertically on the wall and are often called the legs. At this point the tool 10 is placed on top of the legs or tiles 100 and 101. The magnets located on the side of the tool attract to the metal surface of the fireplace box and hold the tool in place. The tool is temporarily placed on the firebox with the aid of the magnet(s). It is sandwiched in between the tiles and grout joint at the upper sides of the legs and the top row of tiles that overhang the top of a fireplace. The curved sections of the tool 40 and 42 clear the uppermost edges of tiles 100 and 104 and allow the tool to be held flush against the metal firebox. Bubble level 60 can be used to verify the tiles are placed in a level orientation. At this point tiles 110, 112 and other tiles can be placed on top of the tool so they cover the upper edge 70 of the metal fireplace box. The tool is held in place until the mortar has dried and then is removed for use on another fireplace.

With the tool in place the tiles placed above the tool will not sagging and will be held in place until the bond between the tiles and the wall has cured. After the tiles have cured in place, the tool can be removed and grout can be spread between the tiles.

Refer now to FIG. 5 that show a detailed view of the tiles being set around the edges of the fireplace 70 and outside of the opening in the fireplace box 80. Magnet 50 is shown located on the tool and magnetically joined to the metal fireplace. Relief 40 a shown clearing tile 100. The under side 32 of wing 30 is shown in contact with the upper surface 101 of tile 100. Tile 110 is brought down until the bottom and to 111 of tile 110 rests on the top surface 34 of wing 30. The remaining tiles 112, 114, and 116 can then be placed on top of the tool.

Refer now to FIG. 6 that show a cross section of the metal fireplace box as it might be installed in a wall. Building studs 74 and 75 are made from lumber or other material to secure the fireplace on to the wall. Drywall or sheet rock 72 surrounds the exterior of the fireplace box. Magnet 50 is shown holding to tool in place on the metal fireplace 70. Tile 100 is the uppermost or top leg tile. This top tile 100 is at the uppermost leg of the tiles on the side of fireplace box. The bottom surface 32 of the tool is shown in contact with the top surface 101 of tile 100. The bottom surface 111 of tile 110 is shown being brought into position where it rests on top surface 34 of the tool.

Refer now to FIG. 7 that shows alternate embodiment of the tool. In this embodiment, the tool is made in pieces where each piece consists of a body section 20 and a wing section 30. The wing may have one or more holes 38 whereby multiple tools can be attached to each other. This tool also has a relief 40 to clear the edges of tiles. The body section 20 may have a thinned section where a hole 39 is located to accept the attachment of additional tools. Additional tools may have a complementary hole 37 similar or identical to hole 38 for fastener 90 to pass through, to join multiple tools together to form a longer tile installation aid. The fastener is shown here, as a threaded fastener, but the fastener may be a rivet or other type that allows connection removal or pivoting of connecting pieces. It is also contemplated that a single slot washer may connect two tools of this type together. These tools may have one or more magnets 50 that will temporarily attach the tool to a metal fireplace.

Thus specific embodiments and applications for winged tile stone or marble installation tool or aid has been disclosed. It should be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art that many more modifications besides those described are possible without departing from the inventive concepts herein. The inventive subject matter, therefore, is not to be restricted except in the spirit of the appended claims.