Title:
Explosives simulation apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An apparatus for simulating an explosive is disclosed. The apparatus includes a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container. The apparatus further includes a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached. The apparatus further includes a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated. In one alternative the apparatus includes a mechanical or electrical trigger that activates the pyrotechnic.



Inventors:
Preston, Steven Gordon (Winter Springs, FL, US)
Penrose, Charles Thomas (Oakland, FL, US)
Collins, Jackie L. (Orlando, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/340092
Publication Date:
07/27/2006
Filing Date:
01/26/2006
Assignee:
Universal Systems & Technology, Inc
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41G3/26
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KLEIN, GABRIEL J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MARK TERRY, ESQ. (Miami, FL, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. An apparatus for simulating an explosive, comprising: a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container; a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached; and a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a housing assembly for holding the canister adjacent to the pyrotechnic so as to allow the pyrotechnic to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, further comprising: a means for fastening the container to the housing so as to allow the canister to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached.

4. The apparatus of claim 3, further comprising: a mechanical trigger that activates the pyrotechnic coupled with the canister.

5. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the container comprises a two-liter volume plastic container.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the canister comprises a twelve-gram cartridge filled with carbon dioxide gas.

7. The apparatus of claim 6, wherein the pyrotechnic is a miniature percussion cap filled with gun powder.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a light for emitting visible light and illuminating powder expelled from the container when the container is breached by gas expelled from the canister.

9. The apparatus of claim 8, further comprising: an infrared emitter for emitting infrared light when the container is breached by gas expelled from the canister.

10. An apparatus for simulating an explosive, comprising: a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container; a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached; a firing pin coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister when the firing pin is forced into the canister; a pyrotechnic coupled with the firing pin so as to force the firing pin into the canister when the pyrotechnic is activated; and a housing assembly for holding the firing adjacent to the pyrotechnic and the firing pin adjacent to the canister.

11. The apparatus of claim 10, further comprising: a means for fastening the container to the housing so as to allow the canister to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached.

12. The apparatus of claim 10, further comprising: a mechanical trigger that activates the pyrotechnic.

13. The apparatus of claim 12, further comprising: an electrical trigger that activates the mechanical trigger, thereby activating the pyrotechnic.

14. The apparatus of claim 10, further comprising: a light for emitting visible light and illuminating powder expelled from the container when the container is breached by gas expelled from the canister.

15. The apparatus of claim 14, further comprising: an infrared emitter for emitting infrared light when the container is breached by gas expelled from the canister.

16. A combat simulation system, comprising: an apparatus for simulating an explosive, comprising: a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container; a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached; a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated; and an electronic receiver for receiving a signal for activating the pyrotechnic, and a transmitter for sending a signal to the apparatus for activating the pyrotechnic.

17. The combat simulation system of claim 16, wherein the electronic receiver further includes: a mechanical trigger coupled with the electronic receiver, wherein the electronic receiver activates the mechanical trigger which then activates the pyrotechnic.

18. The combat simulation system of claim 16, the apparatus further comprising: a light for emitting visible light and illuminating powder expelled from the container when the container is breached.

19. The combat simulation system of claim 18, the apparatus further comprising: an infrared emitter for emitting infrared light when the container is breached.

20. The combat simulation system of claim 18, the apparatus further comprising: an infrared emitter for emitting infrared light when the container is breached, wherein the infrared emitter interacts with individuals participating in the combat simulation system.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present patent application claims priority to U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/647,243 filed on Jan. 26, 2005 and entitled “Security Forces Simulation Training System and Method.” U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/647,243 is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE OF MATERIAL SUBMITTED ON A COMPACT DISC

Not Applicable.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to simulation of explosives, and more particularly to the use of explosives simulation in military training.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Military organizations use a variety military training techniques to instill skills into their members. One of the most effective types of military training is realistic training, otherwise known as war games. This type of training simulates actual combat scenarios and allows the participants to undergo a realistic combat experience. War games usually involve actual deployments of troops and vehicles into a limited area and include all of the movement and action that takes place during a real combat scenario but typically without the danger of live ordinance and ammunition. There has been a move, however, towards more realistic training that involves simulated ordinance, explosions and fired shots.

The U.S. military has implemented the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) as a military training system that provides a realistic battlefield environment for soldiers involved in training exercises. MILES provides tactical engagement simulation for direct fire force-on-force trailing using eye safe laser “bullets.” Each individual and vehicle in the training exercise has a detection system to sense hits and perform casualty assessment. Laser transmitters are attached to each individual and vehicle weapon system and accurately replicate actual ranges and lethality of the specific weapon systems. MILES training has been proven to dramatically increase the combat readiness and fighting effectiveness of military forces.

Soldiers use MILES devices primarily during force-on-force exercises, from squad through brigade level, to simulate the firing and effects of actual weapons systems. These weapons systems include the M1 Abrams Tank, Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, M113 Armored Personnel Carrier, wheeled vehicles and other non-shooting targets. Additionally, basic MILES simulations address anti-armor weapons, machine guns, rifles, and other ancillary items, such as a controller gun, within the program. Combat vehicles, support vehicles and individual solders are instrumented with a GPS receiver for position location determination and a transmitter for sending all recorded data back to central command. All player activity is recorded during an exercise. Position location, and direct and indirect fire event reporting is accomplished through the associated transmitter.

One of the ways in which MILES training can be made to appear more realistic is through the use of simulated explosions and shots fired. Various approaches to this need have emerged. One approach to this need uses a pyrotechnical device that includes an explosive such as gun powder. The explosive is triggered by a MILES component, thereby producing a small but dangerous explosion that includes a fiery discharge, a loud noise and air percussion that can be felt. Although this approach provides a realistic explosive experience, it provides a safety risk associated with the proximity of a person to fire, a small explosion and air percussion, any of which can cause serious injury to a person.

Another approach to the need for realistic explosives uses a container filled with a powder such as talcum powder, which container is burst open by a mechanical or electrical system that is triggered by a MILES component. The burst makes an audible sound that simulates a shot or an explosion and the escaping powder creates a plume that simulates smoke. The mechanical or electrical system may include a spring-powered trigger and may include a gas canister having pressurized carbon dioxide within it. When the gas canister is breached, the escaping gas provides the impetus necessary to burst open the container holding the powder, thereby expelling the powder, emanating a sound and creating a powder plume. One problem with this approach is that the mechanical or electrical system used to trigger the expulsion of the gas or powder often does not have enough force to either breach the gas canister (which is typically made of a light metal such as aluminum) or the container holding the powder. This can lead to mis-fires or dud bombs that never detonate. As such, this reduces the realism of a training exercise and defeats the purpose of having a simulated explosive.

Therefore, a need exists to overcome the problems with the prior art as discussed above, and particularly for a more efficient and safe way for simulating explosives during training exercises.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, according to an embodiment of the present invention, an apparatus for simulating an explosive is disclosed. The apparatus includes a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container. The apparatus further includes a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached. The apparatus further includes a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated.

In another embodiment of the present invention, an apparatus for simulating an explosive is disclosed. The apparatus includes a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container and a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached. The apparatus further includes a firing pin coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister when the firing pin is forced into the canister and a pyrotechnic coupled with the firing pin so as to force the firing pin into the canister when the pyrotechnic is activated. The apparatus further includes a housing assembly for holding the firing adjacent to the pyrotechnic and the firing pin adjacent to the canister.

In another embodiment of the present invention, a combat simulation system is disclosed. The combat simulation system further includes an apparatus for simulating an explosive. The apparatus includes a container including a powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container and a canister including pressurized gas, the canister coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached. The apparatus further includes a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated. The apparatus further includes an electronic receiver for receiving a signal for activating the pyrotechnic. The combat simulation system further includes a transmitter for sending a signal to the apparatus for activating the pyrotechnic.

The foregoing and other features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The subject matter, which is regarded as the invention, is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in the claims at the conclusion of the specification. The foregoing and other features and also the advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. Additionally, the left-most digit of a reference number identifies the drawing in which the reference number first appears.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing the system architecture of a conventional radio-controlled military simulation system.

FIG. 2 is an illustration showing an outdoors implementation of the conventional radio-controlled military simulation system of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the simulated explosive device of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 9 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device, in another embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention provides an inexpensive, safe and user-friendly apparatus for simulating an explosive. The apparatus includes a container including a non-toxic and user-safe powder for simulating an explosive plume, wherein the container bursts when gas is introduced into the container. The breaching of the container cannot cause injuries. The apparatus further includes a pressurized gas canister wherein the canister is coupled with the container so as to expel gas into the container when the canister is breached. The gas used in the canister is user-safe carbon dioxide and the breaching of the canister cannot cause injuries. The apparatus further includes a pyrotechnic coupled with the canister so as to breach the canister and produce an audible noise when the pyrotechnic is activated. The pyrotechnic provides the force necessary to breach the necessary elements of the simulated explosive device, while providing a non-lethal explosion that emits a loud sound and a visual plume.

The features of the present invention are advantageous as they allow for the creation of a realistic explosion while keeping the simulation safe for players. The present invention is further beneficial as it allows for the inexpensive production of the simulated explosive device and easy detonation of the device.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram showing the system architecture of a conventional radio-controlled military simulation system 100. The radio-controlled military simulation system 100 includes a plurality of vehicles 102, 104 through 106, such as tanks, jeeps, armored personnel carriers and heavy hauling equipment. The radio-controlled military simulation system 100 further includes a plurality of individuals 112, 114 through 116, representing soldiers and other individuals participating in the simulation. Each vehicle 102, 104, 106 and individual 112, 114 and 116 in the simulation system can interact with each other as well as with the central controller 110, which controls various aspects of the simulation via radio communication and records simulation information. The central controller 110 includes a radio communication system, as well as a computer network capable of tracking multiple participating entities, controlling various aspects of game play and storing various types of information regarding, the simulation.

As explained above, each vehicle 102, 104, 106 and individual 112, 114 and 116 can be outfitted with a mobile simulation unit that can receive and transmit signals, infrared (IR) signals and radio frequency (RF) signals, for example, such as in the MILES simulation system used by the U.S. military for realistic combat training. The central controller 110 is further able to communicate with the vehicles 102-106 and individuals 112-116 via RF and IR signals. IR signals are typically used to indicate to a mobile simulation unit that the receiver has been injured, killed or otherwise compromised. RF signals are typically used to send a message or other information among mobile simulation units and/or the central controller 110. The MILES simulation system, for example, operates a 285-350 MHz or a 2.4 GHz RF communication system with a range of 10 km over a 20 km squared area.

RF signals can be used to exchange information among mobile simulation units during a simulation. For example, during game play mobile simulation units on individuals 112, 114 and 116 can each broadcast a personal identification (PID) code to indicate the identification of the player. Vehicles 102, 104 and 106 may also broadcast PIDs. In this manner, the central controller 110 may keep up to date on the locations and status of each vehicle 102-106 and player 112-116 in the simulation. The central controller 110 may also send various types of messages to entities participating in the simulation, such as a system command that resets the simulation or a game command that orders an entity to die or become resurrected.

A mobile simulation unit can send out an IR signal when, for example, a player 112 or a vehicle 102 fires a weapon. IR signals are suitable for line-of-sight simulation and are therefore used to simulate weapons firing. The transmission of an IR signal during firing of a weapon can include the PID of the firing entity, a weapon code indicating the type of weapon used and an injury code indicating the type of injury that would be sustained by the receiving entity in such a situation.

A mobile simulation unit may also include a GPS device that comprises a GPS receiver and processor that receives signals from the GPS satellites and calculates the global position of the device, typically in terms of a latitude and longitude. The mobile simulation unit may then transmit over RF to the central controller 110 or other players the position calculated by the GPS device. It should be noted that although FIG. 1 shows only three vehicles 102-106 and three individuals 102-106, a conventional radio-controlled military simulation system 100 may typically support high numbers (sometimes thousands) of entities participating in the simulation.

FIG. 2 is an illustration showing an outdoors implementation 200 of the conventional radio-controlled military simulation system 100 of FIG. 1. The radio-controlled military simulation system 200 includes the vehicles 102, 104 (tanks in this example) and individuals 112, 114 (soldiers on foot) participating in the simulation. FIG. 2 further shows the central controller 110, which controls various aspects of the simulation via radio communications.

FIG. 3 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 300, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 3 shows the simulated explosive device 300 of the present invention, used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 300 includes a container 310 holding a simulation powder 312, such as talcum powder or any other lightweight non-toxic powder sufficient for creating a simulated explosive plume when expelled quickly into the atmosphere. The container 310 may be composed of a lightweight material such as plastic, a light metal alloy, aluminum, composite materials or any other material suitable for holding the simulation powder 312 and breaching when over-pressurized. A portion 314 of the container 310 is designated as the breachable section of container 310 and breaches when the container 310 is over-pressurized.

The simulated explosive device 300 further includes a percussion cap 302 which comprises a small container including an explosive powder 304 such as standard gun powder. The simulated explosive device 300 further includes a weakened wall 305 between the percussion cap 302 and the container 310 holding the simulation powder 312. The percussion cap 302 includes an area 306 into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the percussion cap 302, thereby causing the explosive powder 304 to detonate and breach the weakened wall 305, thereby causing the container 310 to over-pressurize and breach portion 314, thereby causing simulation powder 312 to be expelled quickly into the atmosphere and creating a simulated explosive plume.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 400, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 4 shows the simulated explosive device 400 of the present invention, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 400 includes a cartridge 420 holding pressurized gas, such as a commercially available twelve gram cartridge composed of aluminum and holding pressurized carbon dioxide gas. The cartridge 420 includes an area 422 into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the cartridge 420.

The simulated explosive device 400 further includes a firing pin 424 with a sharpened element that is pointed in the direction of area 422 into which the firing pin 424 may strike the cartridge 420 and breach it. Also shown is a spring 426 which keeps the firing pin 424 away from the cartridge 420 when the simulated explosive device 400 is in a rest mode and has not been activated.

The simulated explosive device 400 further includes a percussion cap 402 which comprises a small container including an explosive powder 404 such as standard gun powder. The simulated explosive device 400 further includes a weakened wall 405 between the percussion cap 402 and the firing pin 424. The percussion cap 402 includes an area 406 into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the percussion cap 402, thereby causing the explosive powder 404 to detonate and breach the weakened wall 405, thereby causing the firing pin 424 to strike the area 422 of the cartridge 420, thereby causing the cartridge 420 to breach and expel its pressurized contents quickly, creating an audible noise.

FIG. 4 also shows a housing 430 for holding the cartridge 420 in place adjacent to the firing pin 424 and a housing 432 for holding the firing pin 424 in place adjacent to the cartridge 420. The housing 430 and 432 are coupled to each other, as well as to housing 434, which also includes a threaded bore 436 to allow a separate element to be screwed into it.

FIG. 5 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 500, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5 shows the simulated explosive device 400 of FIG. 4 together with an added component 502, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion.

The simulated explosive device 500 includes a container 504 holding a simulation powder 506, such as talcum powder or any other lightweight non-toxic powder sufficient for creating a simulated explosive plume when expelled quickly into the atmosphere. The container 504 may be composed of a lightweight material such as plastic, a light metal alloy, aluminum, composite materials or any other material suitable for holding the simulation powder 506 and breaching when over-pressurized. In example, the container 504 is a commercially available plastic two liter container with an end 508 that includes threads 510. It is shown that end 508 is screwed, using threads 510, into threaded bore 436 of housing 434. When the cartridge 420 is breached, it expels its pressurized contents quickly into container 504, creating an audible noise, thereby causing the container 504 to over-pressurize and breach, thereby causing simulation powder 506 to be expelled quickly into the atmosphere and creating a simulated explosive plume.

FIG. 6 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 600, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 6 shows the simulated explosive device 600 (similar to simulated explosive device 400 of FIG. 4) of the present invention, used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. Simulated explosive device 600 differs from simulated explosive device 400 in that device 600 includes the simulation powder within it, wherein device 400 does not.

The simulated explosive device 600 includes a cartridge 620 holding pressurized gas and a cartridge 620 that includes an area 622 into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the cartridge 620. The simulated explosive device 600 further includes a firing pin 624 with a sharpened element that is pointed in the direction of area 622 into which the firing pin 624 may strike the cartridge 620 and breach it. Also shown is a spring 626 which keeps the firing pin 624 away from the cartridge 620 when the simulated explosive device 600 is in a rest mode and has not been activated.

The simulated explosive device 600 further includes a percussion cap 602 which comprises a small container including an explosive powder 604. The simulated explosive device 600 further includes a weakened wall 605 between the percussion cap 602 and the firing pin 624. The percussion cap 602 includes an area 606 into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the percussion cap 602, thereby causing the explosive powder 604 to detonate and breach the weakened wall 605, thereby causing the firing pin 624 to strike the area 622 of the cartridge 620, thereby causing the cartridge 620 to breach and expel its pressurized contents quickly, creating an audible noise.

FIG. 6 also shows a housing 630 for holding the cartridge 620 in place adjacent to the firing pin 624 and a housing 632 for holding the firing pin 624 in place adjacent to the cartridge 620. The housing 630 and 632 are coupled to each other, as well as to housing 634, which also includes a space 636 for holding a simulation powder 638. The housing 634 may be composed of a lightweight material such as plastic, a light metal alloy, aluminum, composite materials or any other material suitable for holding the simulation powder 638 and breaching when over-pressurized.

When the cartridge 620 is breached, it expels its pressurized contents quickly into space 636, creating an audible noise, thereby causing the housing 634 to over-pressurize and breach, thereby causing simulation powder 638 to be expelled quickly into the atmosphere and creating a simulated explosive plume. Simulated explosive device 600 also includes an electrical contact 640 coupled to housing 634 for providing electrical detonation of the device 600.

FIG. 11 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 1100, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 11 shows the simulated explosive device 1100 (similar to simulated explosive device 600) of the present invention, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 1100 differs from simulated explosive device 600 in that device 1100 includes additional element, namely, light emitting devices (LEDs) 1110, 1108.

When firing pin 624 of simulated explosive device 600 is fired, a switch contact 1102 is activated, thereby causing LED batteries 1104 to power LED driver 1106 and light up visible LED 1108 and IR LED 1110. Visible LED 1108 lights up the simulated explosive plume created by simulated explosive device 600 so as to add a visual element to the explosive simulation. IR LED 1110 emits an IR signal which interacts with players in the simulation and may cause, for example, players to be killed or injured in the simulation. Window 112 protects LEDs 1108 and 1110.

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of simulated explosive device 600 of FIG. 6. FIG. 7 shows the percussion cap 602, the housing 632, the firing pin 624, the spring 626, the cartridge 620, the housing 630, the housing 634 and the electrical contact 640.

FIG. 8 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 800, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 8 shows the simulated explosive device 800 of the present invention, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 800 includes a percussion cap 802 which comprises a small container including an explosive powder and a weakened wall 805 facing the container 804 including powder 806. The percussion cap 802 includes an area into which a trigger hammer or other percussion element may strike the percussion cap 802, thereby causing the explosive powder to detonate and breach the weakened wall.

The simulated explosive device 800 further includes a container 804 holding a simulation powder 806. The container 804 may include an end 808 that includes threads. It is shown that end 808 is screwed, using threads, into a threaded bore of housing 834. When the percussion cap 802 detonates, it expels its pressurized contents quickly into container 804, creating an audible noise, thereby causing the container 804 to over-pressurize and breach, thereby causing simulation powder 806 to be expelled quickly into the atmosphere and creating a simulated explosive plume.

The simulated explosive device 800 further includes a solenoid 850 that may be activated by an electrical contact 852 or a trigger spring 854 that may be activated mechanically such as via a trip wire. The solenoid 850 may further activate the trigger 856, which was cocked back using the cocking lever 860. Once activated, the trigger 856 may lunge forward using the spring force from hammer spring 862, so as to strike the percussion cap 802 and set off the chain of events described above.

FIG. 9 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 900, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 9 shows the simulated explosive device 900 (similar to simulated explosive device 800) of the present invention, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 900 differs from simulated explosive device 800 in that device 900 also includes the simulated explosive device 500 from FIG. 5.

The simulated explosive device 900 includes a solenoid 950 that may be activated by an electrical contact 952 or a trigger spring 954 that may be activated mechanically such as via a trip wire. The solenoid 950 may further activate the trigger 956, which was cocked back using the cocking lever 960. Once activated, the trigger 956 may lunge forward using the spring force from hammer spring 962, so as to strike the percussion cap 402 of the simulated explosive device 500 and set off the chain of events described above.

FIG. 10 is an illustration of a simulated explosive device 100, in one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 10 shows the simulated explosive device 1000 (similar to simulated explosive device 900) of the present invention, also used for creating an audible noise and expelling powder into the atmosphere to create a powder plume simulating an explosion. The simulated explosive device 1000 differs from simulated explosive device 900 in that device 1000 also includes an additional element 1002, which is an all-encompassing shell that mimics a combat artillery shell. Element 1002 shows a cross section of the device while element 1004 shows a complete view of the device.

Although specific embodiments of the invention have been disclosed, those having ordinary skill in the art will understand that changes can be made to the specific embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The scope of the invention is not to be restricted, therefore, to the specific embodiments. Furthermore, it is intended that the appended claims cover any and all such applications, modifications, and embodiments within the scope of the present invention.