Title:
Combustible smoke-free briquette
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A briquette includes an upper briquette part, and a lower briquette part under the upper briquette part; both of the upper and the lower briquette parts are made of completely carbonized cinders of burnt shells of grains and small pieces of grass and wood, and are formed by compressing and drying a mixture of the cinders and incombustible adhesives such that the briquette won't fall apart easily after it is burnt; when the upper briquette part is positioned on top of the lower briquette part, a room will be formed between the upper and the lower parts, in which kindling materials will be held and burn, and the upper briquette part propped up off a ground by the lower briquette part; several air passages extend through the briquette from lateral sides of the briquette to the room for the kindling materials.



Inventors:
Hsiao, Jen-te (Minsyong Township, TW)
Application Number:
11/041734
Publication Date:
07/27/2006
Filing Date:
01/25/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
C10L11/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
WEISS, PAMELA HL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ROSENBERG, KLEIN & LEE (ELLICOTT CITY, MD, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A combustible smoke-free briquette, comprising an upper briquette part made of completely carbonized cinders; the upper briquette part being formed by means of compressing and drying a mixture of completely carbonized cinders and incombustible adhesives; and a lower briquette part made of completely carbonized cinders; the lower briquette part being formed by means of compressing and drying a mixture of completely carbonized cinders and incombustible adhesives; the lower briquette part being positioned under the upper briquette part to support the upper briquette part; the upper and the lower briquette parts having such a shape that when the upper and the lower briquette parts are joined to form the briquette, a room will be formed in the briquette for kindling materials to be held and burn therein; the briquette having a plurality of air passages, which extend from lateral sides of the briquette and communicate with the room for kindling materials.

2. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the upper briquette part will be propped up off a ground by the lower briquette part when the upper briquette part is positioned on top of the lower briquette part.

3. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the incombustible adhesives are water glass (sodium silicate solution).

4. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the incombustible adhesives are clay.

5. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the upper briquette part has supporting portions projecting up from two opposing edges of an upper side thereof for supporting objects to be heated.

6. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the completely carbonized cinders are produced by means of burning shells of grains and agricultural waste in a closed space at high temperature.

7. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the completely carbonized cinders are produced by means of burning small pieces of grass and wood and natural waste in a closed space at high temperature.

8. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the kindling materials are nonvolatile solid alcohol.

9. The combustible smoke-free briquette as claimed in claim 1, wherein the kindling materials are nonvolatile oil containing fibrous organic objects.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a combustible smoke-free briquette, more particularly one, which won't dirty people's hands or the places on which the briquette is positioned, and which will burn from the inside outwards, and produce more powerful flames, and which won't produce strange odors or black smoke, and which has excellent cohesion, and won't change shape or fall apart after burnt, and which won't produce such flames as to be easily noticed by people a distance away, thus suiting militaries.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art

Although electricity and gas are convenient to use and easily accessible in modern societies, coals and charcoals, which were the major fuels in earlier time when electricity and gas weren't available, still can't be completely replaced.

Conventionally, charcoals are made by means of burning wood in a closed kiln. However, because wood materials for charcoals are different in sizes, and are positioned in different places in a kiln, it is highly probable that some of the charcoal products are incompletely carbonized, and contain undesirable substances such as lignin and oil. Consequently, black smoke will be produced because of incomplete burning of unsaturated hydrocarbons when charcoals are burnt. And, because coals contain sulphur and phosphorus, strange odors and poisonous gas will be produced when coals are burnt.

Common briquettes are made by means of compressing a mixture of clay and waste such as coal cinders and coal powder, and they aren't formed with any particular shape to be convenient to use.

To sum up, conventional coals and charcoals have the following disadvantages: coals and charcoals will dirty people's hands and the places on which they are positioned; coals and charcoals only can be burnt from the outside inwards, and they can't start to burn easily, and the flames can't be easily controlled; a lot of ashes will be produced after coals and charcoals are burnt, therefore it will take a lot of labor and time to clean up.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is a main object of the invention to provide a combustible smoke-free briquette to overcome the above disadvantages.

The combustible smoke-free briquette of the invention includes an upper briquette part, and a lower briquette part joined to the upper part. Both of the upper and the lower parts are made of completely carbonized cinders of burnt shells of grains and small pieces of grass and wood, and they are formed by means of compressing and drying a mixture of the carbonized cinders and incombustible adhesives such that the briquette won't fall apart easily after it is burnt; a room is provided between the upper and the lower parts, in which kindling materials will be held and burn, and the upper briquette part is propped up off the ground by the lower briquette part. Several air passages extend through the briquette from lateral sides of the briquette to the room for the kindling materials. The briquette won't dirty people's hands or the places on which the briquette is positioned. The briquette will burn from the inside outwards, and the flames will be more powerful. The briquette won't produce strange odors or black smoke because it is made of completely carbonized cinders. The briquette has excellent cohesion, and won't fall apart after burnt. People a distance away won't notice the briquette when the briquette is burning, and the briquette can be used by militaries.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be better understood by referring to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the first embodiment of a combustible smoke-free briquette according to the present invention,

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary exploded perspective view of the first embodiment of a combustible smoke-free briquette,

FIG. 3 is a top view of the first embodiment,

FIG. 4 is a vertical section of the first embodiment being used (1),

FIG. 5 is a vertical section of the first embodiment being used (2),

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view of the second embodiment of a combustible smoke-free briquette, and

FIG. 7 is a view showing a way to use the second embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, a preferred embodiment 1 of a combustible smoke-free briquette includes an upper briquette part 11, and a lower briquette part 12.

Both the upper and the lower briquette parts 11 and 12 are made of completely carbonized cinders of agricultural waste and natural waste such as burnt shells of grains and small pieces of grass and wood, which agricultural waste and natural waste are burnt in closed kilns at high temperature. And, the briquette parts 11 and 12 are formed by means of compressing and drying a mixture of the completely carbonized cinders and those kinds of incombustible adhesives that won't decompose when heated, e.g. water glass (sodium silicate solution), and clay.

The upper briquette part 11 has several through holes 111 and flame passages 112 extending from an upper side to a lower side thereof, a combustion room 113 for kindling materials on the lower side, and several air passages 114 on the lower side, which communicate with outside and the combustion room 113. All of the through holes 111 and the flame passages 112 communicate with the combustion room 113. In addition, the through holes 111 have a larger diameter than the flame passages 112.

The lower briquette part 12 has a holding room 121 for kindling materials on an upper side thereof, several air passages 122 formed on the upper side, which communicate with outside and the holding room 121, and which will respectively communicate with the air passages 114 of the upper briquette part 11 when the upper and the lower briquette parts 11 and 12 are coupled for use. In addition, the lower briquette part 12 has such a shape that the upper briquette part 11 will be propped up off the ground by the lower briquette part 12 when the lower briquette part 12 is fitted in the combustion room 113 of the upper briquette part 11 at the upper end thereof.

To use the briquette 1, first kindling materials are positioned in the holding room 121 and the air passages 122 of the lower briquette part 12, and the lower briquette part 12 is fitted in the combustion room 113 of the upper briquette part 11 at the upper end thereof with the air passages 122 communicating with respective ones of the air passages 114 of the upper briquette part 11, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5; the kindling materials can be nonvolatile oil-containing fibrous organic objects, e.g. small pieces of wood, cloth, and paper, and can be nonvolatile solid alcohol or other combustible chemicals. Then, those of the kindling materials that are in the air passages 122 are lighted so that all of the kindling materials start to burn. Consequently, the briquette 1 start to burn, and flames pass through the upper ends of the through holes 111 and the flame passages 112 of the upper briquette part 11. Because the briquette 1 has the air passages 114, 122, air is allowed to flow into and out of the holding room 121 and the combustion room 113, and in turn the briquette 1 will start to burn easily. In addition, the through holes 111 can be used as chimneys because they have a larger diameter than the flame passages 112.

Referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, an alternative upper briquette part 13 is provided, which can be used with the lower briquette part 12 instead of the upper briquette part 11, and which has a combustion room 131 for kindling materials on a middle of a lower side, several air passages 132 formed on the lower side and communicating with outside and the combustion room 131, and several flame passages 133 extending from an upper side to the lower side thereof. Furthermore, the upper briquette part 13 has supporting portions 134 projecting up from two opposing edges of the upper side thereof for supporting objects to be heated, e.g. a barbecue grille 2. To use the upper briquette part 13 with the lower briquette part 12, first kindling materials are positioned in the holding room 121 of the lower briquette part 12, and the kindling materials are lighted. Next, the lower briquette part 12 is fitted in the combustion room 131 of the upper briquette part 13 at the upper end thereof with the air passages 122 communicating with respective ones of the air passages 132 of the upper briquette part 13. Consequently, the briquette 1 starts to burn. Because air is allowed to flow into and out of the holding room 121, flames will reach outside from the upper ends of the flame passages 133 of the upper briquette part 13.

From the above description, it can be easily understood that the combustible smoke-free briquette of the invention has advantages as followings:

1. The briquette has excellent solidness and cohesion because the briquette is made of completely carbonized cinders, and is formed by means of joining the completely carbonized cinders with incombustible adhesives. Consequently, the briquette won't dirty people's hands or the places on which the briquette is positioned.

2. The briquette can be more easily lighted because the briquette has the air passages communicating with the holding room and the combustion room inside, in which the kindling materials are held and burnt. And, because the briquette burns from the inside outwards, the flames will be more powerful.

3. The briquette won't produce strange odors or black smoke because it is made of completely carbonized cinders and incombustible adhesives.

4. The briquette has excellent solidness and cohesion, and won't change shape or fall apart because it is formed by means of compressing mixture of cinders and incombustible adhesives. Consequently, it is easy to dispose of the briquette and clean after the briquette is burnt.

5. There will be sufficient upward flow of air through the upper briquette part because the upper briquette part is propped up off the ground by the lower briquette part, without use of an additional stove. Consequently, the briquette will completely burn.

6. Pans, barbecue grilles and so on can be directly positioned on the briquette without use of an additional stove because the upper briquette part (the second embodiment) has the supporting portions on the upper side thereof.

7. Because the briquette has the flame passages, little light will be present owing to the flames when the briquette is burning. Therefore, people a distance away won't notice the briquette when the briquette is burning, and the briquette can be used by militaries.