Title:
Coil bar anchor
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A coil bar anchor for embedding into concrete structures has a threaded segment utilizing a coil thread and an anchor segment, the entire coil bar anchor being formed out of a single piece of material.



Inventors:
Azarin, Michael (Dunwoody, GA, US)
Application Number:
11/030543
Publication Date:
07/06/2006
Filing Date:
01/06/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/38
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
AHMAD, CHARISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SMITH, GAMBRELL & RUSSELL (ATLANTA, GA, US)
Claims:
1. A coil bar anchor consisting essentially of a single piece of material with: a) a threaded segment at a first end having a diameter and internal threads of a predetermined number; and b) an anchor segment at a second end, wherein the coil bar anchor is manufactured as a single unitary structure and the internal threads cooperate with the threads on a lifting attachment.

2. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the threaded segment has a length measured axially of at least twice the thread diameter.

3. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 2, wherein the threaded segment has a length between approximately 1 inch and 3 inches and a thread diameter of between 0.5 inch and 1.5 inches.

4. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 2, wherein the anchor segment has a length of up to approximately 25 inches and a diameter of between approximately 0.25 inch and 1.25 inches.

5. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the threaded segment is capable of receiving a lifting attachment.

6. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor segment has a linear shape.

7. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor segment has a non-linear shape.

8. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 7, wherein the non-linear shape is selected from the group consisting of arcs, waves, and helixes.

9. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor segment has protrusions on an outer surface thereof.

10. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the anchor segment has dimples on an outer surface thereof.

11. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, where in the internal threads are coil threads.

12. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 1, wherein the single piece of material is a metal rod, the threaded segment of the first end has an outer diameter of between approximately 0.75 inch and approximately 2.0 inches, the threaded segment of the first end has a length of between approximately 1.0 inch and approximately 4.0 inches, anchor segment of the the second end has an outer diameter of between approximately 0.25 inch and approximately 1.25 inches, and the anchor segment of the second end has a length of up to approximately 25 inches.

13. In a coil bar anchor comprising a threaded segment and an anchor segment, the improvement comprising manufacturing the coil bar anchor out of a single piece of material and the threaded segment having an internal coil thread for cooperating with a lifting attachment.

14. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 13, wherein the single piece of material is a metal rod, the threaded segment of the first end has an outer diameter of between approximately 0.75 inch and approximately 2.0 inches, the threaded segment of the first end has a length of approximately twice the outer diameter, the anchor segment of the second end has a diameter of between approximately 0.5 inch and 1.25 inches, and the anchor segment of the second end has a length of between approximately 5 inches and approximately 12 inches.

15. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 14, wherein the anchor segment has surface disruptions on an outer surface thereof.

16. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 15, wherein the anchor segment has a non-linear shape.

17. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 16, wherein the non-linear shape is selected from the group consisting of arcs, waves, and helixes.

18. The coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 15, wherein the anchor segment has a linear shape.

19. A method for manufacturing a coil bar anchor comprising the steps of: a) forming an internal coil thread into a first end of a single piece of material having a suitable thickness; and b) shaping a second end of the rod into an anchor segment.

20. The method for manufacturing a coil anchor as claimed in claim 19, wherein the single piece of material is a metal rod, the first end has an outer diameter of between approximately 0.75 inch and approximately 2.0 inches, the first end has a length of between approximately 1.0 inch and approximately 4.0 inches, the second end has a diameter of between approximately 0.25 inch and 1.25 inches, and the second end has a length of between approximately 5 inches and approximately 25 inches.

21. The method for manufacturing a coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 20, wherein surface disruptions are formed onto an outer surface of the anchor segment.

22. The method of manufacturing a coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 21, wherein the anchor segment is shaped into a non-linear shape.

23. The method of manufacturing a coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 22, wherein the non-linear shape is selected from the group consisting of arcs, waves, and helixes.

24. The method of manufacturing a coil bar anchor as claimed in claim 21, wherein the anchor segment is shaped into a linear shape.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

The present invention relates generally to construction materials and methods. More particularly, this invention relates to coil anchors for use for lifting and positioning structural materials such as concrete barriers and other heavy and/or cumbersome devices. This invention further relates to a method for manufacturing such a coil anchor.

2. Prior Art

Concrete structures, such as prefabricated barriers or panels, are ubiquitous in the construction industry. As these structures are very heavy, they often must be transported, lifted and positioned through the use of heavy equipment such as a crane. In order to facilitate the transporting, lifting and positioning of such structures, lifting assists and anchors, such as coil anchors, are installed in the concrete structures so as to provide a means to grasp and lift such structures. Typically, the anchors and other lifting assists are embedded into such structures and lifting attachments, such as lifting loops or lifting members, are attached to the anchor or other lifting assist. Often, the anchors and other lifting assists must be positioned within such structures the lifting attachment may be installed onto the anchor after the structure or panel has been formed or cut to the proper length or size.

The lifting attachments, once attached to the anchor or other lifting assist, are used to lift and position the structure into place. In many instances, the lifting attachments often are releasably attached to the structure and often removed once the structure has been position as desired on site. More particularly, the lifting attachments, such as lifting rings and bolts, are installed and removed at the building site, and therefore preferably are designed to be easily and rapidly installed and removed in order to save the maximum amount of time. Not surprisingly, the prior discloses devices placed within concrete structures that allow for the attachment of lifting attachments.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,655,015 to Hoyer discloses an anchor tie device for the construction industry that is in common use. The Hoyer '015 device is an anchor tie for use in carrying prefabricated concrete components and has a threaded part for connecting the tie member to a lifting device and a tie rod member that is secured within the prefabricated concrete component. The tie rod has two end portions such that the first end is secured to the threaded part and the second end is shaped so as to form at least one undulation. The threaded part and the tie rod are secured together by means of radial pressure swaging.

Although the Hoyer '951 device is suitable for many applications, the use of a swaging attachment technique has drawbacks. The two piece structure defines a relatively weak point in the anchor tie, particularly at the junction between the threaded part and the tie rod part. Often the weak point will be the first break or separate during movement and transport of the structure.

Further, current coil anchors in the US comprise a coiled wire with a welded strut. Such a coil anchor is shown in FIG. 1. This device comprises a ā€œUā€-shaped wire strut welded to a coiled wire and is formed into the concrete structure with the opening of the coiled wire (the top of FIG. 1) even or close to even with the surface of the concrete structure, with the bulk of the device within the concrete structure. A coil bolt then can be screwed into the opening of the coiled wire to lift the concrete structure. This type of coil anchor has a weak point at the weld between the strut and the coiled wire, as would most if not all two-piece structures.

Accordingly, there is always need for an improved anchor for use in the construction industry. For example, there is a need for an improved anchor having fewer or no weak points, or with weak points that are relatively strong compared to prior art devices, and with a stronger means for securing a lifting attachment within the anchor. Such an improved anchor should have a relatively simple structure and be relatively inexpensive to manufacture. Further, such an improved anchor should be able to be embedded securely into concrete and other heavy or cumbersome structures such that the anchor may resist forces applied to the anchor during lifting and positioning. It is to these needs, among others, that the present invention is directed.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly, the present invention is a coil bar anchor that is embedded into concrete and masonry structures, and the like, such as concrete panels and barriers to assist in the transporting, lifting and positioning of such structures. For the purposes of this disclosure, all such structures will be referred to as concrete structures no matter what their material of manufacture. The coil bar anchor comprises a coil thread segment and an anchor segment (sometimes referred to as a tie rod or tie bar), which are formed as a unitary structure out of a single piece of material. The anchor segment comprises a shaped length of material and is secured within or to the concrete structure to secure the coil bar anchor to the concrete structure. The threaded segment comprises an interior coil thread accessible through an open top side. A lifting attachment is screwed into the threaded segment so that a crane or other lifting mechanism can lift, transport and/or position the concrete structure.

The coil bar anchor is preferably manufactured from a high strength material such as iron or steel. The coil thread segment is comprised of a spiral coil of material and the anchor segment is comprised of a rod of material that can be bent afterward to create a desired shape, if desired. Overall, the unitary coil anchor of the present invention has an overall stronger structure than that of the two-piece anchors seen in the prior art, utilizes a coil thread for added strength over conventional bolt threads, and can have a multi-dimensional anchor segment design for added strength in being retained within the concrete structure.

More particularly, unlike the prior art, because the present invention is formed from a single piece of material, the junction between the threaded segment and the anchor segment is not a weak point relative to the entire coil bar anchor. That is, because the coil bar anchor is formed as a unitary generally uniform uninterrupted structure, the junction between the threaded segment and the anchor segment is stronger than junction between the two separate sections of the prior art. In fact, it has been found that manufacturing the coil bar anchor from a single piece of material results in a stronger coil anchor than manufacturing a coil anchor from two or more separate pieces.

In use and application, the coil bar anchor may be embedded or cast into a concrete structure. In one embodiment, the coil bar anchor is placed into the wet material (that is, the uncured concrete or other masonry material, or other suitable materials such as epoxies, carbon fiber materials, graphite fiber materials, ceramics, and the like) such that a cast forms around at least the anchor segment and preferably also the threaded segment with the top side of the threaded segment accessible afterward. In another embodiment, a hole or slot is drilled into the concrete structure, a construction epoxy is filled therein, and coil bar anchor is inserted into the hole such that top side is accessible afterward. In another embodiment, the coil bar anchor is positioned within a mold of a concrete structure and the concrete material is poured into the mold such that the mold is filled and the wet material forms a cast around the anchor shafts. After the material has set and cured, the coil bar anchor is secured within the concrete structure.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for manufacturing the coil bar anchor. Rather than swaging a coil threaded segment to a separate anchor segment as in the current art, the present invention is formed from a single piece of material. A coil thread can be formed into one end of a rod having a suitable constant diameter, with the other end of the rod acting as the anchor segment. Alternatively, a rod having a larger diameter at one end can be used, with the coil thread being formed into the end of the rod having the larger diameter. Alternatively, a coil bar anchor can be cast using a suitably shaped multi-piece mold.

These features, and other features and advantages of the present invention, will become more apparent to those of ordinary skill in the relevant art when the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments is read in conjunction with the appended drawings in which like reference numerals represent like components throughout the several views.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a prior art coil anchor in common use.

FIG. 2 is a side view of one embodiment of the coil anchor of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a sectional side view of the coil anchor shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a side view in partial section of the coil anchor of the present invention embedded in a concrete structure and coupled to a lifting attachment.

FIG. 5 is a side view in partial section of the coil anchor of the present invention embedded in a concrete structure and coupled to a lifting attachment that shows in greater detail how the lifting attachment is attached to the threaded segment of coil anchor.

FIG. 6 is a cutaway side view showing the coil anchor of the present invention in a concrete structure held in place using an epoxy resin.

FIG. 7 shows alternative structures of the outer surface of the anchor segment of the present invention, with FIG. 7A showing common raised ridges of rebar, FIG. 7B showing alternative protrusions, and FIG. 7C showing dimples.

FIG. 8 is a side view of an alternative structures for the anchor segment of the present invention, with FIG. 8A showing a simple two-dimensional arc structure, FIG. 8B showing a more complex two-dimensional wave structure, FIG. 8C showing a complex three-dimensional helix structure, and FIG. 8D showing a straight structure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Illustrative embodiments of the present invention include a coil bar anchor to be embedded into concrete structures and structures of other materials, such as but not limited to concrete and cement barriers, concrete and cement panels, and prefabricated panels and barriers. The coil bar anchor of the present invention is useful particularly with concrete structures that are lifted or positioned using mechanical means. While the invention is described herein in conjunction with the preferred and illustrative embodiments, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to these embodiments.

Referring now to the figures in general, the figures illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention in the best mode known to the inventor at this time. Specifically, FIG. 2 is a side view of one embodiment of the coil bar anchor 10 of the present invention illustrating the unitary structure and the relationship between the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30. FIG. 3 is a sectional side view of the coil bar anchor 10 shown in FIG. 2 illustrating how the coil thread 22 is formed into the interior of the threaded segment 20. FIG. 4 is a side view in partial section of the coil bar anchor 10 embedded in a concrete structure and coupled to a lifting attachment 40. FIG. 5 also is a side view in partial section of the embedded coil bar anchor 10 and the lifting attachment 40 that shows in greater detail how the lifting attachment 40 is attached to the threaded segment 20 of the coil bar anchor 10. FIG. 6 is a cutaway side view showing the coil bar anchor 10 in a concrete structure 100 held in place using an epoxy resin 101. FIG. 7 shows alternative structures of the outer surface of the anchor segment 30. FIG. 8 shows alternative structures for the anchor segment 30.

Referring now to FIG. 2, an embodiment of a coil bar anchor 10 in accordance with this invention comprises a unitary device having threaded segment 20 at a first end and an anchor segment 30 at a second end. In this embodiment, the threaded segment 20 is at one end of the coil bar anchor 10 and provides a means to attach various lifting attachments 40 to the coil bar anchor 10 or to connect the coil bar anchor 10 to a lifting device (not shown). The anchor segment 30, which is shown having a wave shape 32, can extend from the threaded section 20 and can provide a means to secure the coil bar anchor 10 in a concrete structure 100 (see FIG. 4). In the preferred embodiment, the coil bar anchor 10 is formed or cast as a single structure.

Referring now to FIG. 3, the threaded segment 20 has internal threads 22 that serve as a means for reversibly securing the coil bar anchor 10 to lifting attachments 40. More particularly, the threaded segment 20 is capable of receiving the threaded stem 50 of a lifting attachment 40. The internal threads 22 preferably are of the conventional coil form and may be of English or metric units. The coil threads provide a stronger means for connecting the lifting attachment 40 to the coil bar anchor 10 than conventional bolt threads. As it is important that the threaded segment 20 connects the coil bar anchor 10 to the lifting attachment 40, the internal threads 22 should be large enough so that they are not stripped out by the lifting forces that may act thereon through lifting attachment 40.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the coil bar anchor 10 is shown placed preferably into the concrete structure 100 such that the entire coil bar anchor 10 is embedded within the concrete structure 100 and the top edge 21 of the threaded segment 20 is flush with the surface 26 of the concrete structure 100. The threaded segment 20 cooperates with the stem 52 of each lifting attachment 40. More particularly, the stem 52 comprises an external male thread that cooperates with the internal female thread of the treaded segment 20, and the stem 52 can be threaded into the threaded segment 20.

The shape of the anchor segment 30 may be formed using a cold forming process, a casting process, or any other material forming process suitable for the material of manufacture of the coil bar anchor 10. Such a process is applied to produce a short arc or other disruption in the straight portion of the anchor segment 30. More particularly, after a preliminary structure consisting essentially of the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 has been formed as a single unitary structure, the arc shape 32 or any other desired disruption may be introduced into the structure of the anchor segment 30. This arc shape 32 or other disruption serves to help retain the coil bar anchor 10 within the concrete structure 100 better generally with higher strength than with a straight anchor segment 30. Thus, arc shape 32 can be any two-dimensional or three-dimensional disruption of the linear shape of anchor segment 30.

Preferably, the coil bar anchor 10 is manufactured from a single, generally linear, piece of material, with the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 being formed on opposite ends. In one embodiment, the anchor segment 30 may be formed initially as straight rod and subsequently manipulated to a desired arc, wave, helix or other form. It has been found that manufacturing the coil bar anchor 10 from a single piece of material results in a stronger device than manufacturing a coil anchor from two or more separate pieces.

The anchor segment 30 assists in anchoring the coil bar anchor 10 within a concrete or other material structure, such as concrete structure 100, and typically has a length (measured axially) up to approximately 25 inches or longer depending on the load of the concrete structure, and preferably between 6 inches and 25 inches. The anchor segment 30 typically has a diameter or thickness of up to 1.25 inches, and preferably between 0.25 inch and 1.25 inches. Preferably, the threaded segment 20 has a length of up to 6 inches, and more preferably between 1 inches and 4 inches, and more preferably between 11 inch and 3 inches, with a diameter of between 0.75 inch and 3 inches, and more preferably between 0.75 inch and 2 inches. The length of the threaded segment should be on the order of twice the diameter or more of the threaded segment. Preferably, the anchor segment 30 has a straightened length of up to 25 inches, and is approximately straight for up to approximately 2 to 6 inches extending from the threaded segment 20 and curved for approximately 3 to 6 additional inches. The length, diameter or thickness, and curvature design of the anchor segment 30 can be selected based on the application and one of ordinary skill in the art can select the length, diameter or thickness, and curvature design of anchor segment 30 without undue experimentation.

Referring now to FIG. 5, the lifting attachment 40 is attached to the threaded segment 20 of the coil bar anchor 10. More particularly, the lifting attachment 40 may be attached to the embedded coil bar anchor 10 by threading the male stem 50 of the lifting attachment 40 into the female internal threads 22 of the threaded segment 20. The pressure connection in the threaded segment 20, that is the internal threads 22 against the threads 52 of the lifting attachment 40, provides a means of reversibly connecting the coil bar anchor 10 and the lifting attachment 40. In such an embodiment, the lifting attachment 40 may be conveniently connected to the mechanical means, such as a crane.

In a preferred application, the coil bar anchor 10 is embedded into a concrete structure 100. In one embodiment, both the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 are embedded in the concrete structure 100 by casting concrete structure 100 around the anchor bar coil 10 leaving the open top end of the threaded segment exposed so as to be able to receive a lifting attachment. Preferably, the concrete structure 100 is molded such that the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 are immobilized in the concrete structure 100. For example, the concrete material may be poured into a mold or frame so that the concrete material flows around threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 such that the top edge 21 of the threaded segment 20 is flush with the surface of the concrete structure 100.

In this arrangement, the lifting attachment 40 may be attached to the threaded segment 20. As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the lifting attachment 40 is threaded into the threaded segment 20 so to provide effective resistance against pulling the lifting attachment 40 from the coil bar anchor 10. Once the lifting attachment 40 is no longer needed, the lifting attachment 40 may be recovered and reused with another coil bar anchor 10 or with the same coil bar anchor 10. Specifically, the lifting attachment 40 may be removed from the coil bar anchor 10 by rotating or unthreading the lifting attachment 40 from the coil bar anchor 10.

Referring now to FIG. 6, the coil bar anchor 10 is shown mounted in a pre-formed slot in a concrete structure 100. Hole or slot 104 is drilled into the concrete structure 100 (as mentioned previously, for ease of understanding, all structures for which the coil bar anchor 10 can be used will be referred to as a concrete structure 100 irrespective of the actual material of manufacture), a construction epoxy 101 is filled therein, and the coil bar anchor 10 is then inserted therein such that top side of the threaded segment is accessible. This can be considered a retrofit application for the coil bar anchor 10. A slot 104 of a radius (or other shape depending on the shape of the coil bar anchor 10 or the tool used to create the slot 104) larger than of the anchor segment 30 and wider than the cross section of the threaded segment 20 is drilled or otherwise formed into the concrete structure 100. After the debris and any extraneous material are removed, an injection gun may be used to inject a construction epoxy 101 into the slot 104. Starting with the anchor segment, the anchor segment is inserted then into the slot 104 such that the top side 21 of the thread segment 20 is flush with the outer surface of the concrete structure 100 and such that the internal threads 22 are accessible. The construction epoxy 101 surrounds the coil bar anchor 10 (except for the top side 21) once the coil bar anchor 10 is in place. After the construction epoxy 101 has set and cured, the coil bar anchor 10 is secured in place within the concrete structure 100. This method of installation provides a means for installing the coil bar anchor 10 into concrete structure 100 that has previously set.

Referring now to FIG. 7, the anchorage of the coil anchor 10 within the concrete structure 100 can be improved by introducing ribs 25 or other surface features along the outer surface of anchor segment 30. FIGS. 7A, 7B and 7C show alternative structures of the surface of the anchor segment 20. FIG. 7A shows the common raised ridges 25 of rebar, FIG. 7B shows alternative protrusions 24 and FIG. 7C shows dimples 26. In one embodiment, the outer surface of the anchor segment 20 may have a uniform pattern of the ribs 25. In another embodiment, the outer surface of the anchor segment 20 may have a pattern of protrusions 24 or dimples 26. The use of ribs 25, protrusions 24 or dimples 26 provides additional holding force for the anchor segment 30 within the concrete structure 100. However, the invention also can be used with tie-rods that have relatively smooth external surfaces or some other profile.

Referring now to FIG. 8, the anchor segment 30 can have a variety of structures. FIG. 8A shows the simple two-dimensional arc structure. FIG. 8B shows a more complex two-dimensional wave structure. FIG. 8C shows a complex three-dimensional helix structure. FIG. 8D shows a linear rod structure, which is suitable for many situations. For most situations, the arc structure of FIG. 8A will be sufficient to maintain the coil bar anchor 10 within the concrete structure 100. If added holding strength is needed, that is, if the concrete structure 100 is heavier, the wave structure of FIG. 8B or the helix structure of FIG. 8C may be required to maintain the coil bar anchor 10 within the concrete structure 100. Thus, the shape of the anchor segment 30 may be in one or more planes.

Another aspect of the invention is a method for manufacturing the coil bar anchor 10. The coil bar anchor 10 may be manufactured from a suitable metal or other material. For example, the coil bar anchor 10 may be machined, molded or cast from an iron or steel bar stock. The quality of steel suitable with the coil bar anchor 10 may be selected according to the load bearing forces upon the coil bar anchor 10. One of ordinary skill in the art may select a suitable material without undue experimentation. Rather than swaging a coil threaded segment 30 to a separate anchor segment 20 as in the current art, the present invention is formed from a single piece of material. A coil thread can 22 be formed into one end of a rod having a suitable constant diameter, with the other end of the rod acting as the anchor segment 30. Alternatively, a rod having a larger diameter at one end can be used, with the coil thread 22 being formed into the end of the rod having the larger diameter. Alternatively, a coil bar anchor 10 can be cast using a suitably shaped multi-piece mold.

The dimensions of the coil bar anchor 10 may be dependent on the designed load requirements of a particular application. However, the dimensions may depend on factors such as size of the mechanical lifting device, the size, weight and composition of the concrete structure 100, and the material selected for the coil bar anchor 10. One of ordinary skill in the art may select appropriate dimensions for the coil bar anchor 10 and components thereof.

In one embodiment, the internal threads 22 number at least eight turns; however, a greater or lesser number of internal threads 22 may be necessary to support larger concrete structures 100. It is contemplated that between four and twelve turns should be sufficient for the majority of applications. It is necessary that the coil interior be free of concrete and has a sufficient number of turns to engage the threads 52 of the lifting attachment 40 stem 50

As disclosed previously, in use and application, the coil bar anchor 10 preferably is embedded or cast into a concrete structure 100. The coil bar anchor 10 may be used with or embedded in any concrete structure 100. For example, such concrete structures 100 may include prefabricated panels or barriers and concrete blocks. Further, the coil bar anchor 10 may be used with or embedded in prefabricated walls and construction panels. Concrete structures 100 suitable with this invention are obvious to those with ordinary skill in the art.

In one embodiment, the coil bar anchor 10 is placed into the wet material (that is, the uncured concrete or other masonry material, or other suitable materials such as epoxies, carbon fiber materials, graphite fiber materials, ceramics, and the like) such that a cast forms around the walls of the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30. In another embodiment, a hole or slot 104 is drilled into the concrete structure 100 (as mentioned previously, for ease of understanding, all structures for which the coil bar anchor 10 can be used will be referred to as a concrete structure 100 irrespective of the actual material of manufacture), a construction epoxy 101 is filled therein, and the coil bar anchor 10 is then inserted therein such that top side 21 of the threaded segment 20 is accessible. In another embodiment, the coil bar anchor 10 is positioned within a mold of a concrete structure 100 and the concrete material is poured into the mold such that the mold is filled and the wet material forms a cast around coil bar anchor 10 such that the top side 21 of the threaded segment 20 is accessible. After the material has set and cured, the coil bar anchor 10 is secured in place within the concrete structure 100.

One advantage of the coil bar anchor 10 is that the junction between threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 is stronger than that of the coil anchors of the prior art. As coil bar anchor 10 is formed as a single structure, the junction between the threaded segment 20 and the anchor segment 30 is substantially stronger than that of prior inventions.

While the coil bar anchor 10 is disclosed in connection with the lifting attachment 40, it is understood that the coil bar anchor 10 may used with any fixture or object that may be connected the threaded segment 20. For example, the coil bar anchor 10 could be used with bolts or other construction members. Such fixtures or objects that may be used with coil bar anchor 10 are readily known to those with ordinary skill in the art.

The above detailed description of the preferred embodiments, examples, and the appended figures are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to limit the scope and spirit of the invention, and its equivalents, as defined by the appended claims. One skilled in the art will recognize that many variations can be made to the invention disclosed in this specification without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.