Title:
Archery bow sight with power saving laser sighting mechanism
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A laser sight for an archery bow is dimensioned and configured to be mounted on a mounting bracket for a conventional sighting pin. The laser sight is further configured to not interfere with the optional use of conventional sighting pins. The laser sight may include a pull switch that activates the laser sight in response to drawing the bow to provide hands free activation of the laser sight.



Inventors:
Hodge, Kevin (Bardstown, KY, US)
Axelrod, Glen S. (Colts Neck, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/256678
Publication Date:
06/01/2006
Filing Date:
10/21/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
124/87
International Classes:
F41G1/467
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RICCI, JOHN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GROSSMAN, TUCKER, PERREAULT & PFLEGER, PLLC (MANCHESTER, NH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A laser sight for an archery bow comprising: a laser element comprising a laser diode and an activation switch; and a mounting pin extending from said laser element, said mounting pin adapted to be received in a sight pin bracket disposed on a bow.

2. A laser sight according to claim 1 wherein said activation switch comprises a hands free switch activating said laser sight in response to drawing a bow string.

3. A laser sight according to claim 2 wherein said activation switch comprises a pull switch.

4. A laser sight according to claim 3 wherein said pull switch comprises a flexible member extending from said laser element to a moving component of said bow.

5. A laser sight according to claim 2 wherein said activation switch comprises a proximity switch.

6. A laser sight according to claim 6 wherein said activation switch comprises a magnetic activation switch.

7. A laser sight according to claim 6 wherein said magnetic activation switch comprises a magnetic element and a metal plate, said magnetic activation switch being in a first activation state when said metal plate is in a first position relative to said magnetic element and said magnetic activation switch being in a second activation state when said metal plate is in a second position relative to said magnetic element.

8. A laser sight according to claim 7 wherein said metal plate is positioned on a moving component of said bow, said metal plate being in a first position relative to said magnetic element when a bow string is in an un-drawn condition and said metal plate being in a second position relative to said magnetic element when said bow string is in a drawn condition.

9. An archery system comprising: a bow comprising a first and second limb coupled to a handle at a first end of each limb, and a string extending between a second end of each limb; and a sight bracket disposed on said handle, said sight bracket comprising at least one sight pin and a laser sight; said laser sight comprising a laser element comprising a laser diode and an activation switch, and a mounting pin extending from said laser element, said mounting pin adapted to be received in said sight pin bracket.

10. An archery system according to claim 9 wherein said laser sight comprises an activation switch responsive to a drawn condition of said string.

11. An archery system according to claim 10 wherein said activation switch comprises a pull switch.

12. An archery system according to claim 10 wherein said activation switch comprises a proximity switch.

13. An archery system according to claim 12 wherein said activation switch comprise a magnetic switch.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a Continuation of International Application No. PCT/US2004/012687 filed Apr. 23, 2004 and published Nov. 4, 2004 as International Publication No. WO 2004/094934, designating the United States, and which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/464,768 filed Apr. 23, 2003, the teachings of which are incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a sighting system for an archery bow. More particularly, the present invention relates to an illumination sighting system for an archery bow that illuminates the target with a light and which provides power saving and convenient on/off switching performance.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Conventional archery laser sights are typically mounted on a specially provided bracket, such as shown in FIG. 5. Unfortunately, the mounting bracket usually spaces the laser sight from the path of the arrow, which can introduce angular error along much of the arrows path. Therefore the field of accuracy is limited to only those narrow regions around the intersection of the laser's path and the arrows path.

Additionally, the mounting brackets required for most laser sights often replace the fixtures needed for conventional sighting pins or otherwise interfere with the use of conventional sighting pins. While it may often be desirable to use a laser sight over a conventional sighting pin, in very bright lighting conditions the visibility of the projected laser dot may be greatly reduced, making it difficult for an archer to determined the point of aim. In such circumstances the lack of conventional sighting pins may leave the archer without any capability to accurately aim the arrow.

Conventional laser sights are generally activated by a switch that must be manually engaged. However this may increase the time needed to properly acquire a target once spotted. In addition the necessary act of turning the laser sight on or maintaining pressure on a switch may require awkward and uncomfortable positions that may compromise accuracy.

SUMMARY

The present invention provides a laser sight for use with an archery bow. The laser sight may be dimensioned and configured to be mounted on a mounting bracket for conventional sighting pins, and may be configured not to interfere with the optional use of the conventional sighting pins. Additionally, the laser sight may be activated by a switch in response to drawing the bow. According to one embodiment, the switch may, for example, have a flexible member attached to a portion of the bow that moves when the bow string is drawn. This aspect may provide hands free activation of the laser sight when the bow is drawn and corresponding deactivation when the draw is released.

According to one aspect, there is provided a laser sight for an archery bow including a laser element having a laser diode, and an activation switch, and a mounting pin extending from the laser element. The mounting pin may be adapted to be received in a sight pin bracket disposed on a bow.

According to another aspect, an archery system is provided including a bow having a first and second limb coupled to a handle at a first end of each limb, and a string extending between a second end of each limb. The archery system may further include a sight bracket disposed on the handle, in which the sight bracket includes at least one sight pin and a laser sight. The laser sight of the archery system may include a laser element having a laser diode, and an activation switch, and a mounting pin extending from the laser element. The mounting pin may be adapted to be received in the sight pin bracket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Features and advantages of the present invention are set forth by the description of exemplary embodiments of the invention, which description should be understood in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is an elevation view of an exemplary laser sight consistent with the present invention, including an enlarged schematic view showing one exemplary pull switch;

FIG. 1a illustrates an enlarged view of an exemplary pull-switch that may suitably be used with the laser system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 schematically illustrates an exemplary proximity switch that may be used with a laser sight consistent with the present invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary archery bow set up including a laser sight consistent with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged front view of the sight mounting feature of FIG. 3, including a laser sight consistent with the present invention and a conventional sighting pin; and

FIG. 5 illustrates a conventional archery bow set up including a conventional laser sight provided on a separate mounting bracket and showing the effect of angular error with the sight.

DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS

An archery sighting device consistent with the present invention directs an illuminating image onto a target for aiming an arrow fired from an archery bow. While the term “laser sight” is used herein to describe the sighting device, a laser illuminating element is only one exemplary illuminating element. Alternative illuminating elements will be apparent to those having skill in the art.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, a general set up of an exemplary laser sight 10 consistent with the invention is shown. The laser sight 10 may be provided having a compact size and shape, which may allow the laser sight 10 to be mounted in a sight pin guard bracket 12, which may be provided on an archery bow, along with any conventional sight pins 14. In one embodiment, the laser sight 10 may be sized such that it does not interfere with the use of the conventional sight pins 14, thereby providing the archer with the opportunity to alternatively aim with either the laser sight 10 or the conventional sighting pins 14. The alternative use of the conventional sighting pins 14 may be especially advantageous in very brightly lit environments that may make a laser dot generated by the laser sight 10 difficult to see.

In addition to not obscuring or replacing the conventional sighting pins 14, the ability to position the laser sight 10 inside the pin guard bracket 12 may place the laser sight 10, and the beam 16 projected by the laser sight 10, generally inline with both the sight pins 14 and the arrow 18 and the arrow path 20. By positioning the laser sight 10 generally along the arrow path 20 the accuracy of the laser sight 10 may be increased over a broader window of yardages. This increased window of accuracy may be provided by reducing the angular error of the system. That is, the farther the laser sight 10 is from the path of the arrow 20, the greater the angle formed between the laser path 16 and the arrow path 20, and therein the narrower the field of accuracy. Conversely, the closer the laser sight 10 is to the path of the arrow 20, the smaller the angle formed between the laser path 16 and the arrow path 20, and therein the broader the field of accuracy.

According to one embodiment, positioning the laser sight 10 in close alignment with the conventional sighting pins 14 may advantageously be achieved by actually mounting the laser sight 10 to the pin bracket 22 that carries the conventional sighting pins 14. In addition to placing the laser sight 10 generally inline with the conventional sighting pins 14 this mounting configuration may eliminate the need for a separate mounting bracket that may have a negative impact on the balance or feel of the bow.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, an embodiment of a mounting configuration of the laser sight 10 is shown. As in the illustrated embodiment, the laser element 40 may be disposed on the end of a standard type bolt 42, such as would be used for mounting a conventional sighting pin 14. Accordingly, the laser sight 10 may be received in a standard sight pin track (not shown). Advantageously, the laser sight 10 may be retained using two thumb screws 44, 46 one of which may be disposed on either side of the mounting bracket 22. The thumb screws 44, 46 may be employed to clamp the laser sight 10 in a desired position on the mounting bracket 22. As mentioned above, this mounting arrangement may not only eliminate the need for additional mounting hardware, but may also place the laser sight 10 generally inline with the conventional sighting pins 14.

Adjustment of the windage and/or elevation of the laser sight 10 may be carried out in a similar manner as with a conventional sighting pin 14. For example, adjustment of the laser sight 10 may be carried out using any global windage and/or elevation adjustment of the sight bracket 22 for producing left/right or up/down translation of the entire mounting bracket 22. Additionally, the laser sight may be adjusted independently of the sight bracket 22 and other pins, e.g. 14, by loosening at least one of the thumb screws 44, 46 and moving the complete laser sight unit 10. For example, elevation may be adjusted by loosening one of the thumb screws 44, 46 and moving the laser sight 10 in the pin track, which typically runs vertically or diagonally. Alternatively, at least one of the thumb screws 44, 46 may be loosened and the laser sight 10 rotated about the axis of the bolt 42 to angle the projected beam up or down. In a corresponding manner, the windage may be adjusted by loosening one of the thumb screws, e.g. 44, and tightening the other thumb screw 46, thereby advancing or retracting the laser sight 10 relative to the mounting bracket 22.

With continued reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, another unique aspect of the laser sight 10 is the method of activation. Desirably the laser sight 10 may be activated, i.e., turned on, in response to a pull switch 50. Desirably a flexible member 54, such as a flexible tube, a string, wire, etc. may be coupled to the pull switch 50 and to a moving part of the bow such that drawing back the bow string 52 activates the laser sight 10. Accordingly, it is not necessary to engage a button or slide switch to activate the laser sight 10, thereby allowing hands-free activation. Referring to FIG. 3, some exemplary attachment points of the flexible member 54 are shown including the bow string 52, the string separator 55, cables 57, limbs, e.g. 59, cams 61, 63, etc. Release of the bow string, either by firing an arrow or not, may deactivate the laser sight 10.

Referring to FIG. 1a a first exemplary pull switch 50 is shown including a connecting pole 60 connected to the flexible member 54. The exemplary pull switch 50 may include an inner cap 62 that keeps a spring ground wire 64 from completing the circuit with the batteries 66, 66′ until the flexible member 54 is pulled. When the flexible member 54 is pulled, the spring 68 urges the batteries 66, 66′ to shift and allow the spring ground wire 64 to complete the circuit activating the laser diode 70. Releasing the tension on the flexible member 54 may cause the circuit to open, thereby deactivating the laser diode 70.

Referring to FIG. 2 an exemplary proximity switch 50a is illustrated including a magnetic activating element 80. Consistent with this embodiment a small metal plate 82 may be attached to the bow. The metal plate 82 is disposed adjacent the magnetic element 80 such that when the bow is drawn the metal plate 82 moves the two magnetic element 80 may allow current to flow though the wires 84 associated with the flexible member 54. When current is allowed to pass through the magnetic element 80 the laser sight 10 is activated.

Numerous other switch configurations for activating the sight will be understood by those having skill in the art. Such alternative switches may include pull switches; proximity switches; strain switches, which may be activated by flexing of the bow; etc. Such alternative switches will preferably be responsive to drawing the bow. Similarly, alternative mounting configurations within the spirit of the invention herein will also be appreciated by those having skill in the art.