Title:
Board game with challenges
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game may include a game board, game pieces, and rules for playing a game for a plurality of players. A goal of the game may be to collect character attributes during game play and use those attributes to successfully complete a final challenge. The game may also include multiple tile-like pieces, a number of character movers, and at least one die. The tile-like pieces may be used to provide character attributes and present intermediate challenges during game play. Play may include moving character movers between a beginning game space and an end game space along one or more main pathways interconnected by bridging paths.



Inventors:
Barthold, Mark (Torrance, CA, US)
Blagg, Benjamin (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/202047
Publication Date:
05/04/2006
Filing Date:
08/10/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/249
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KOLISCH HARTWELL, P.C. (PORTLAND, OR, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A set of game components, comprising: a game board comprising: a beginning game space; an ending game space; a first plurality of pathway spaces defining a plurality of separate main pathways, each extending continuously between the beginning and ending game spaces; and a second plurality of pathway spaces defining one or a plurality of bridging paths, each bridging path configured to connect at least two main pathways; a plurality of game tiles configured to be placed upon at least a subset of the pathway spaces; a plurality of character movers configured to be supported on any selected one of the pathway spaces and game spaces; and a number generator.

2. The set of game components of claim 1, wherein the game board, the game tiles, and the character movers embody a game theme.

3. The set of game components of claim 2, wherein the game theme is a jungle adventure theme.

4. The set of game components of claim 1, wherein each game tile has indicia and at least a portion of the pathway spaces include indicia associated with at least one game tile.

5. The set of game components of claim 4, wherein at least some of the game tiles each include indicia representing a number of game challenges

6. The set of game components of claim 4, wherein at least some of the game tiles each include indicia representing a reward.

7. The set of game components of claim 1, wherein at least some of the pathway spaces include indicia representing a game challenge

8. A game using the set of game components of claim 1, the method comprising the steps of: placing a first game tile including indicia of a first game challenge on a first pathway space; selecting a character mover; using the number generator to generate a number; moving the character mover from a second pathway space to the first pathway space, wherein the second pathway space is separated from the first pathway space by a number of pathway spaces determined by the generated number; and accomplishing the first game challenge defined by the first game tile when the character mover is placed on the first pathway space when the first game tile is located on the first pathway space.

9. The method of claim 8, further including the step of: progressing from a beginning game space to an ending game space by performing the steps of moving the character mover and accomplishing a plurality of game challenges.

10. The method of claim 9, further including the step of: using the plurality of game challenges accomplished to determine a final challenge to be accomplished at the ending game space.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is based upon and claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/601,681, filed Aug. 12, 2004 and entitled “Board Game.” U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/601,681 is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The present disclosure relates generally to board games. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to rules and apparatus for playing a pathway collection board game for two or more players wherein the object of the game is for a player to confront a final challenge on a game board and successfully complete that challenge.

BACKGROUND

Examples of related pathway collection games with tokens signifying point values or tools are found in U.S. Patents and Patent Application Publications numbered: 815,960; 907,421; 1,705,141; 2,470,632; 3,201,129; 3,799,547; 3,865,381; 3,871,659; 3,889,954; 4,192,512; 4,396,195; 4,456,258; 4,477,080; 4,666,162; 4,669,734; 4,696,476; 5,004,245; 5,009,431; 5,129,655; 6,481,714; 6,575,463; 6,581,932; D305,039; D328,616; US2002/0185813; and US2002/0190466. Another example of an apparatus embodying some aspects of a pathway collection game may be found in European Patent Publication WO02/092,178. The disclosures of the aforementioned patents and patent publications are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure relates to rules and apparatus for playing a pathway collection game that may Utilize a game board, a plurality of game cards, a random number device, and a number of character movers. The game board may contain a number of interconnected pathways. In addition, the game board may include beginning and ending game spaces, which may be the beginning and ending points of a number of interconnected pathways. A plurality of game cards may be provided with the game board, and the game cards may provide for variability in game play by affecting rewards earned, penalties received, and obstacles overcome by a player during the course of game play. A number of character movers may be provided with the game board and game cards, such that a number of players may simultaneously play a game according to the present disclosure.

In an illustrated embodiment, the indicia used in the game, including a game board, game cards, and character movers, are based on characters, items, and adventures appearing in a Maxsteel™ collection of toys and games.

The advantages of a game played according to the present disclosure will be understood more readily after consideration of the drawings and the Detailed Description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts an embodiment of a game board suitable for use with a game according to the present disclosure.

FIGS. 2A-2D depict embodiments of game cards suitable for use with a game according to the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure relates to a pathway collection game playable by two or more players. In an illustrated embodiment, two or more players may control character movers and move them about a game board, gaining character mover attributes by collecting skill tokens and/or playing cards. A set of character mover attributes collected by a player may be used in a confrontation with a nemesis disposed at a certain location on the game board. A first player to collect a set of character mover attributes necessary to defeat the nemesis may be declared winner of the game.

As shown in FIG. 1, a game 8 as provided in the present disclosure may include a game board 10 with an associated playing surface 12 having a beginning game space 16 connected via a number of pathway spaces 17 to an ending game space 18. Pathway spaces 17 may define both main pathways 14 and bridging paths 15 between the beginning and ending game spaces. A plurality of game tiles 30 may be provided with the game, and the game tiles may define a number of game challenges to be accomplished by a number of players as the players move their character movers 40 about the game board. Progression of a character mover about the game board may be made at the direction of a number generator 60, such as a standard die.

FIG. 1 shows generally, at 10, an overview of a game board of a game 8 of the present disclosure. The game board 10 may have a playing surface 12 that contains a number of separate main pathways 14. Main pathways 14 may connect a beginning game space 16 to an ending game space 18. At least a pair of main pathways 14 may be connected by a bridging path 15, such that a game player moving a character mover along one main pathway may cross to another main pathway by way of a bridging path. Main pathways 14 and bridging paths 15 may each include a number of pathway spaces 17.

Game board 10 may be constructed of any suitable material and may have any suitable shape, such as a generally square shape, and it may be two-dimensional or it may be three-dimensional. Game board 10 may be constructed of any suitable material for forming a stable game surface. For example, the game board may be made of cardboard or heavyweight paper, or plastic, or rubber, etc. A playing surface 12 of game board 10 may present a playing area for game 10. Playing surface 12 may be a design printed directly onto a base board. Alternatively, or in addition, playing surface 12 may be a printed substrate that is fastened to a base board through any suitable securing means. For example, playing surface 12 may be configured as a printed piece of heavyweight paper that is glued into immovable fixation with a base board. In other embodiments, playing surface 12 and game board 10 may be configured as a flexible material that could be laid down temporarily onto, for example, a tabletop, or a countertop, or any other suitable surface. For entertainment value, playing surface 12 may be printed with a theme that provides for interesting game play. For example, playing surface 12 could be colored randomly, or it could be printed into a colorful pattern, or it could present a chosen game theme. In an illustrated embodiment, playing surface 12 may be printed with a jungle or wilderness theme.

As noted earlier, playing surface 12 may include a number of main pathways 14 having a number of serially positioned pathway spaces 17. A game player may move a character mover along a number of pathway spaces 17 making up a main pathway 14. For example, a plurality of main pathways 14 may connect a beginning game space 16 to an ending game space 18. Alternatively, a single main pathway 14 may connect a beginning game space 16 to an ending game space 18. In proceeding from the beginning game space to the ending game space, a given main pathway may not describe a direct, rectilinear route, but may describe an indirect, curving or otherwise direction-varying route. Alternatively, or in addition, some main pathways 14 may proceed in a rectilinear manner from the beginning game space to the ending game space, while other main pathways 14 may proceed in a nonrectilinear manner from the beginning to the ending game space.

Main pathways 14 may be interconnected by bridging paths 15. Bridging paths 15 may connect two or more pathways 14 at any of one or more locations along the lengths of the pathways, and may serve to give a game player more options in choosing a route between a beginning game space and an ending game space. For example, it may be the case that a game player is moving a character mover along a first main pathway from the beginning game space to the ending game space. However, the game player may wish to move the character mover along a second, different main pathway. By utilizing a bridging path 15, a player may move from the first main pathway to the second main pathway.

Main pathways 14 may be composed of a number of pathway spaces 17. A set of pathway spaces 17 on a game board may include a number of subsets of special pathway spaces. Subsets of pathway spaces may include pathway spaces defining obstacle challenges, spaces defining opportunities for reward accumulation, spaces that serve to alter game play, and/or spaces that may have no special purpose. Other types of pathway spaces are possible. Distinct subsets of pathway spaces on the main pathway may be differentiated by the color of subsets of pathway spaces, or by differences in shape between subsets of pathway spaces, or by any other means to differentiate one subset of spaces from another. In an illustrated embodiment, pathway spaces without a special function may be colored some hue of green, as part of a general jungle theme to a game board. Pathway spaces involving an obstacle challenge, for example, such as represented by pathway spaces 11, 13, may be colored a different color, perhaps black. Pathway spaces involving a reward accumulation, for example, as represented by pathway spaces 19, may be colored blue or red. Pathway spaces involving an alteration in game play, for example, as represented by pathway space 21, may be colored yellow.

Another way that subsets of pathway spaces may be differentiated from each other may be by placing differentiable game tiles 30 upon each special pathway space, or by each space identifying a type of game tile that may then be drawn from a stack. Shown in FIGS. 2A-2D are exemplary embodiments of a challenge pathway space 11 and game tiles 30 that may be used to differentiate individual pathway spaces 17 from each other, or to provide added enjoyment or variety to a game according to the present disclosure. A challenge pathway space 11 or 13, as shown in FIG. 2A may be a pathway space with which an indicium 31 defining a number obstacle has been permanently associated. Such a permanent association may be accomplished by, for example, printing the indicia upon a chosen pathway space. Game tiles 30, on the other hand, may have only a temporary association with a given pathway space being, for example, placed on a pathway space for at least a portion of the duration of a game. Game tiles 30 may include obstacle tiles 32, equipment tiles 34, and/or challenge tiles 36. Other types of game tiles may possibly be used, as a way to add variety to the game.

Game tiles 30 may be placed upon a subset, or all, of pathway spaces 17. Each game tile may be made of a material similar to that of game board 10, or the tiles may be made of a different material from the game board. A game tile 30 may have at least two distinct surfaces. If the game tile is configured with both a front surface and a back surface, the two surfaces may be distinct from one another. For example, the back surface of a game tile 30 may be configured such that all game tiles have a similar or identical appearance on their back surfaces. It is also possible that subsets of game tiles, such as obstacle tiles 32, equipment tiles 34, challenge tiles 36, or any other types of tiles, may share common back surface designs only among game tiles of the same subset. The front surface of a game tile 30 may be distinct from the back surface of the same tile. The front surface of a game tile 30 may also be distinct from front surfaces and/or back surfaces of all or some other game tiles. The front surface of a game tile may be configured with a number of differentiable icons. For example, the front surface may contain one or more of a number 31, an image 33 and an icon 35, or any other distinct feature or features.

As noted, the front surface of a game tile may have any distinctive number, image or icon, or some combination of these. A number 31 on a game tile may represent a number that a player must exceed with a random number generator, perhaps a standard die, to either successfully overcome an obstacle tile or to accumulate an equipment tile (described below). An image 33 on a game tile may be a decorative image meant solely to differentiate one game tile from another. Or, the image may represent different types of equipment that must be gathered before a game player can attempt and successfully complete a final challenge. On a nemesis card 36, which is an example of a specific type of challenge tile (seen in FIG. 2D), a plurality of images 33 may represent a collection of equipment icons a player may need to have in their possession to successfully complete a final challenge. An icon 35 may represent a special characteristic a game tile may have. For example, on an equipment tile 34, the icon 35 may signify that the equipment tile gives a player points to use in a later challenge, that the player may take another turn, that the player may roll the die (or use another random number generator) again, or that the player may move their character mover a defined number of pathway spaces. Yet another equipment tile may be a “wild” tile that a player may use for any of the above-described functions, or for some other function.

A game tile 30 may be placed front surface down on a pathway space 17 of a game board. In one embodiment, the game tile may be placed face down so that a game player may not be aware of the nature of an obstacle before confronting the obstacle. In another embodiment, the game tile may be placed front surface up so that the game player may be aware of the identity of the game tile and may use that awareness when playing a game according to the present disclosure. Alternatively, it is possible that some game tiles may be placed front surface up on the game board, while other game tiles are placed front surface down on the game board.

Obstacle tiles 32 (FIG. 2B) may be used on some or all of pathway spaces 17. For example, obstacle tiles 32 may be placed only on obstacle pathway spaces 13. Obstacle tiles 32 may present a challenge to a game player or may cause the game player to temporarily halt movement of a character mover. For example, the obstacle tile may signify a challenge that the player must overcome before the player may continue moving a character mover along a pathway. In an illustrated embodiment, an obstacle tile may require that, upon reaching the obstacle tile on a pathway space, the player halt movement of their character mover until the player uses a chance number generator to generate a number greater than or equal to a number on the obstacle tile. Alternatively, the player may be required to generate a number that is lower than or equal to a number on the obstacle tile before resuming movement of the character mover. An obstacle tile may be configured to present any appropriate challenge to the player. In some cases, the obstacle presented by an obstacle may be permanently associated with a pathway space, such as being permanently marked on the pathway space of a playing surface. Such an embodiment is shown in FIG. 2A. In this case, the “obstacle tile” may be reduced only to the numerical value or values of the obstacle, permanently associated with the pathway space, and may not include any icons or other differentiating symbols.

Equipment tiles 34 (FIG. 2C) may be placed on pathway spaces 17 and may provide a reward to a player who accomplishes a task denoted by a given equipment tile. More specifically, equipment tiles 34 may be placed on equipment pathway spaces 19. An accumulated equipment tile reward may be used during game play. Such an accumulated equipment tile reward may be used during travel along a pathway, or a reward may be used during a final challenge to win a game. The equipment tile may be used to alter travel along a pathway or it may be used to alter game play in some other manner. For example, an equipment tile may allow a player who gains that tile to move forward or backward a number of spaces without using a random number generator. In another example, an equipment tile may allow a player to roll a random number generator again, or take an extra turn at some future time. Many types of equipment tile rewards are possible. To accumulate a given reward on an equipment tile, some embodiments of the disclosed game may require that the player generate a specific number with a random number generator. Alternatively, to accumulate a given reward a player may be required to generate a number higher than, or lower than, a number present on an equipment tile. Any other appropriate challenge may be configured to a same or similar effect.

Information on an equipment tile may help or hinder a player who encounters the tile. Information on the equipment tile which may assist a player might consist of a requirement for the player to move forward on the game board a set number of spaces, or it may consist of a description of a piece of equipment which may help the player during game play or be reserved for later use. Helpful equipment may allow the player to move to a pathway space of their choice, for example, or to add numerical value to a roll of the die (thus increasing the number of spaces the player may be allowed to move during a given turn Of the game). Information on an equipment tile which may hinder the player might include, for example, a command for the player to stay on a pathway space for at least one extra turn, instead of moving about the playing surface.

Challenge tiles 36 may be present on specialized pathway spaces on a game board. Some challenge tiles may be present in the middle of the game board, and/or on a challenge pathway space 19, while other challenge tiles may be present at one or both ends of a game board pathway. For example, one challenge tile may be present in the middle of the game board at a special challenge space 21 and may serve to inhibit a player's travel over a particularly interesting or important portion of the game board. As another example, a challenge tile may be present at a location that serves as a terminus for each of a number of main pathways 14 present on the playing surface 12. Such a challenge tile at the common pathway terminus may be a final challenge that the player must complete to win a game. For example, the challenge tile may take the form of a nemesis attribute card (FIG. 2D), which may enumerate a set of qualities which may be needed by a player to overcome a final challenge and win the game.

To move about a playing surface 12 and progress through a number of activities, players of a game according to the present disclosure may each control movement of a selected or assigned character mover 40. Each character mover may take any appropriate form for being identified distinctly in a group of character movers. For example, the character mover 40 may be of single-piece construction and may assume a distinctive and interesting physical appearance. Alternatively, the character mover may be made of multiple pieces that may be assembled together. For example, for ease of storage the character mover may be made of a visually-distinctive vertical piece attached to a commonly used horizontal base. Such an attachment may be permanent or temporary; a temporary attachment may be useful, for example, if the game player would like to disassemble the character mover between games played. Character movers may be assigned as one per player of the game. Character movers may be used as markers for keeping track of the player's current location on the game board, and may provide a visual representation of the player's progress toward a next challenge. In a preferred embodiment of the present disclosure, character movers 40, shown in FIG. 1, may take the form of Max Movers, bearing some resemblance to a toy Max Steel™ doll.

Having described, separately, many components of a game according to the present disclosure, there follows a description of possible game play with the described game board and components. The game may consist of a series of moves repeated by game players as they progress from a beginning game space 16 to an ending game space 18. For example, a game may begin by one or more of the players placing game tiles on one or more of the pathway spaces. Each player may select a character mover as their token to move about the game board. The players may each use a number generator, for example a standard die 60, to generate a number used to determine movement of the character movers about the game board. Each player may move their character mover from one pathway space to another, where the pathway spaces are separated by a number of spaces identical to the number generated. In reaching a given pathway space, a player may undertake and accomplish a game challenge defined by the game tile resident upon that pathway space.

In an illustrated embodiment of the present disclosure, a game board and associated game components may be used to play a “Max Steel™ Jungle Adventure” board game. Max Steel™ is a commercial action figure toy, and a nemesis present in the jungle adventure game may be one of the nemeses provided for play with the Max Steel™ action figure. In an illustrated embodiment of the present disclosure, the nemesis of the jungle adventure game may be Elementor™. An object of the game may be to become a first player to reach a common terminus of a number of game board pathways and defeat Elementor™ after having acquired a set of equipment tiles necessary to defeat Elementor™.

In an exemplary game 8, challenge tile pathway spaces have an unknown identity before a player occupies one of those spaces, as the challenge tile on a given space is placed face down until removed by the player. As the player successfully completes a challenge, they may, depending upon the nature of the challenge completed, proceed around a game board or acquire an equipment tile. Progression about the game board and acquisition of appropriate equipment tiles may allow the player to proceed toward a confrontation with Elementor™ and possible victory in the game. An object of the game may be to attempt and to overcome various obstacles and to collect a number of equipment tiles. Upon the accumulation of a number of equipment tiles, a player may progress to the ending pathway space 18 to complete a final challenge against Elementor™. Successful completion of an Elementor™ challenge may lead to the player being declared winner of the game.

In this example, game play may begin with game players placing a game board or playing surface in an appropriate location. Each player may choose a distinctive Max Steel™ character mover as their on-board character and may place the character mover On a beginning pathway space 16. If present, a special character mover representing Elementor™ may be placed at ending pathway space 18. Alternatively, Elementor™ may be represented by a printed image on the playing surface. Obstacle tiles 32 and equipment tiles 34 may be shuffled and placed face down on assigned obstacle and equipment pathway spaces on the playing surface. Challenge tiles may likewise be placed on their assigned pathway spaces. Any nemesis attribute cards may be placed to one side of the game board, with their front surfaces visible. Game play may begin with a youngest player taking a first turn. Each game player may choose any of the main pathways 14 leading away from the beginning pathway space as the pathway they would like to follow. A pathway may be chosen because it leads to a number of challenge areas that the player would like to attempt.

To move a character mover about the playing surface, a player may roll a die to determine a random number. The player must decide to follow one of a number of pathways, and must then move their character mover a number of spaces that is the same as the number displayed by the die. Once the player's character mover has been placed on one of the pathways, the player may move the character mover forward (toward the ending space) or backward (toward the beginning space) so long as they do not change travel directions during a single turn. The player must move the character mover the number of spaces denoted by the number on the die, unless the character mover encounters an obstacle tile, in which case the player must end movement of the character mover.

Upon reaching an obstacle tile, a player may be required to end movement of their character mover and turn the obstacle tile such that the front surface of the obstacle tile is visible. A given obstacle tile may have a number upon its face. To overcome the obstacle presented by a number-containing obstacle tile, the player may be required to roll a die and have the die show a number that is equal to or higher than the number on the face of the obstacle tile. If the obstacle tile is “defeated” in this manner, the player may roll the die again and complete a regular movement. The defeated obstacle tile may then be moved to any available space on the playing surface. If the player does not defeat the obstacle tile they have reached, the player's turn is over. On a subsequent turn, the player may move backward along the pathway, or the player may attempt to defeat the obstacle tile again.

Some pathway spaces on a game board may be configured as number obstacles, and may be confronted by a player in a similar manner as a pathway space containing an obstacle tile. The number obstacle pathway space may be permanently marked with a set of one or more numbers, or it may be marked with a given number tile. If a player reaches the number obstacle, the player may be required to roll a die and have the die show a number that is the same as one of the one or more numbers on the number obstacle pathway space. For example, if the number obstacle pathway space is marked “1-3-5,” then the player reaching the pathway space may be required to roll the die and have it display one of the numerals 1, 3, or 5 to proceed along the game board pathway.

Some pathway spaces may contain equipment tiles, representing equipment that may be collected by a player before they reach the end of a game board pathway. For example, collected equipment may be indicated by an icon for a jet pack, or a jeep, or a watercraft, or a weapon of some sort, etc. As with an obstacle tile, the equipment tile may reside on a pathway space such that its front surface is hidden. To collect the equipment tile, the player may be required to move their character mover onto the equipment tile pathway space with an exact roll of a die. This is unlike the case with an obstacle tile, which may halt the movement of the character mover even if the player did not reach that obstacle with an exact roll of the die. If the player reaches an equipment tile pathway space, the player may turn the equipment tile such that its front surface is visible. Each equipment tile may include a number as one of the indicia on its front surface. For the player to collect the given equipment tile, the player may be required to roll the die and have the die display a number equal to or greater than the number on the equipment tile.

Equipment tiles may also be collected by a player in a manner other than by a player's character mover landing exactly on a pathway space containing the equipment tile. For example, some pathway spaces on a playing surface may be designated as special equipment spaces. Special equipment spaces may be denoted by an icon, or a distinctive color, or any other appropriate signifier. If the player moves their character mover along a pathway and the character mover crosses a special equipment space, the player may turn over any one of the equipment tiles which they previously passed on the pathway such that the tile's front surface is visible. Once the equipment tile is turned face up by the player, the player may attempt to collect the equipment tile by rolling with a die a number equal to or greater than the number displayed on the face of the exposed equipment tile. In this manner, the player may collect an item of equipment without having to move their character mover directly onto the equipment tile pathway space.

An equipment tile that has been collected by a player may be kept in front of that player for immediate or future use. For example, the player may use an accumulated equipment tile to overcome an obstacle tile which they reach with their character mover. Alternatively, or in addition, the player may use one or more accumulated equipment tiles in a final challenge against Elementor™ (discussed below). Any equipment tile that the player chooses to use during a game must be placed back onto the playing surface on an empty equipment tile pathway space.

Equipment tiles may come in a number of different types. Equipment tiles may be labeled as: +1 attack, +2 attack, roll again, extra turn, +3 spaces, +5 spaces, and wild. An “attack” tile may be used to overcome various obstacles that a player may reach during travel about a game board. “Roll again” may be used if, for example, the player attempts to overcome a number-based obstacle but does not roll, with a die, a number needed to successfully overcome the obstacle. “Extra turn” may be used any time the player wishes to advance further along a pathway or wishes to attain some other goal that requires movement about the game board. A “+3 spaces” or a “+5 spaces” tile may be used by the player to advance more quickly about the game board, or to move in any desired direction, without the player having to roll the die. A “wild” tile may allow the player to choose any of the above actions as needed in a specific game situation. Each of the equipment tiles may have indicia upon one face, and the indicia may include a number, an icon, and/or an image.

A player may proceed about a game board as described above, overcoming obstacles and collecting equipment tiles. After the player encounters a pathway space containing an equipment tile, the player may wish to attempt to win a game by overcoming a final Elementor™ challenge. To enter the final challenge against Elementor™, the player must move their character mover over a pathway space that relates to an Elementor™ attribute tile. If the player's character mover passes over a nemesis attribute tile pathway space, the player may choose from among a plurality of nemesis attribute tiles that denote a set of characteristics that Elementor™ may have during a final challenge. In an illustrated embodiment, there may be four nemesis attribute tiles (FIG. 2D), each with a plurality of numbers and images that define Elementor™ attributes in the final challenge.

The Elementor™ final challenge may be defined by a nemesis attribute tile, which may be used to denote the equipment tiles a player must have accumulated to increase their odds of overcoming Elementor™ in the final challenge. A nemesis attribute tile may include at least two given numbers, and a plurality of equipment tile images. A first number inscribed upon the nemesis attribute tile may denote a first value of nemesis “life points.” A second number inscribed upon the nemesis attribute tile may denote a second value of nemesis life points. The second value of nemesis life points may be used in the Elementor™ challenge if the player accumulated, during game play, a number of equipment tiles carrying images that match the images on the nemesis attribute card.

To defeat Elementor™ in a final challenge, a player may be required to roll a die and achieve a number that is greater than the value of Elementors™ life points. As noted above, a given nemesis attribute tile may have two values of nemesis life points. A first value of life points may be the “strength” of Elementor ™ if the player reaches the final challenge without having accumulated any equipment tiles. A second value of life points may be the “strength” of Elementor™ if the player reaches the final challenge having accumulated all the equipment tiles represented on the nemesis attribute tile. For example, the first life point value may be “eight,” while the second life point value may be “four.” If the player reaches the final challenge without the full complement of equipment tiles represented by the images on the nemesis attribute tile, the first life point value may be decremented by “one” for each equipment tile collected by the player that is represented on the nemesis attribute tile. For example, if the first life point value is eight, and there are three equipment tiles represented by the images on the nemesis attribute tile, then the life point value for a player collecting one of the represented equipment tiles may be seven. For two represented equipment tiles: six. And for the complete set of three represented equipment tiles: four (including a one-point bonus for collecting all three represented equipment tiles). It may be that the initial life point value, and the value of life points if the player has only collected one equipment tile, may be higher than the highest number the player could roll (six) if the game is played with a standard die. This circumstance may encourage the player to collect more than one equipment tile before attempting the final challenge.

If a player rolls a die and achieves a number greater than Elementors™ assigned life points, then the player may be declared the winner of a game. If the player rolls a die and does not achieve a number greater than Elementors™ assigned life points, then the player fails the final challenge and may not be declared the winner of the game. If the player fails in the final challenge, then the player must return to the nearest Elementor™ nemesis attribute pathway square and continue playing the game. The player who fails the final challenge must also place back onto pathway spaces any of the equipment tiles they accumulated in the course of the game.

It is believed that the disclosure set forth above encompasses multiple distinct inventions with independent utility. While each of these inventions has been disclosed in its preferred form, the specific embodiments thereof as disclosed and illustrated herein are not to be considered in a limiting sense as numerous variations are possible. The subject matter of the inventions includes all novel and non-obvious combinations and subcombinations of the various elements, features, functions and/or properties disclosed herein. Similarly, where the claims recite “a” or “a first” element or the equivalent thereof, such claims should be understood to include incorporation of one or more such elements, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements.

Inventions embodied in various combinations and subcombinations of features, functions, elements, and/or properties may be claimed through presentation of new claims in a related application. Such new claims, whether they are directed to a different invention or directed to the same invention, whether different, broader, narrower or equal in scope to the original claims, are also regarded as included within the subject matter of the inventions of the present disclosure.





 
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