Title:
Turbine-tip arrowhead
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention is a turbine tip arrowhead, used either strictly as a field point or as the forwardmost tip in conjunction with any prior art broadhead assembly. The key feature of this turbine tip is the geometry, which includes a tapered tip and a plurality of helical rifles, consisting of either grooves or ridges, beginning at the tip of the field point and spiraling back towards the aft end. All rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine. This turbine tip design provides excellent rotation of the arrow shaft during flight without producing a large amount of aerodynamic drag. The invention is compatible with all contemporary arrow shafts and with all contemporary broadhead assemblies. A novel broadhead assembly utilizing the turbine tip and deployable blades to produce axial rotation is also described.



Inventors:
Kuhn, Todd A. (North East, MD, US)
Application Number:
10/966409
Publication Date:
04/20/2006
Filing Date:
10/18/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B65/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RICCI, JOHN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Todd A. Kuhn (North East, MD, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An arrowhead comprising: a body; a plurality of helical rifles integral to said body; and an attachment means used to mount said arrowhead on a contemporary arrow shaft; wherein a portion of said body tapers to a point at one end; wherein said rifles begin at said point and spiral down the longitudinal axis of said body; and wherein all said rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine.

2. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein said rifles are close together around said body so that they contact each other down their entire helical length.

3. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein there are between about three and about ten said rifles.

4. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein there are eight said rifles.

5. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein said rifles are defined as grooves if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of said body does not exceed the nominal maximum diameter of said body, and wherein said rifles are defined as ridges if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of said body exceeds the nominal maximum diameter of said body.

6. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein said rifles terminate partially down a portion of the axial length of said body.

7. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein said attachment means comprises a threaded post.

8. An arrowhead according to claim 1, wherein said body is cylindrical.

9. A broadhead arrowhead comprising: a ferrule, at least one blade coupled to said ferrule, an attachment means used to mount said broadhead on an arrow shaft, and a tip; wherein said tip further includes a plurality of helical rifles integral to said tip; wherein said tip further includes an attachment means used to mount said tip on said broadhead; wherein a portion of said tip tapers to a point at one end; wherein said rifles begin at said point and spiral down the longitudinal axis of said tip; and wherein all said rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine.

10. An arrowhead according to claim 9, wherein said rifles are close together around said body so that they contact each other down their entire helical length.

11. An arrowhead according to claim 9, wherein there are between about three and about ten said rifles.

12. An arrowhead according to claim 9, wherein there are eight said rifles.

13. An arrowhead according to claim 9, wherein said rifles are defined as grooves if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of said body does not exceed the nominal maximum diameter of said body, and wherein said rifles are defined as ridges if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of said body exceeds the nominal maximum diameter of said body.

14. An arrowhead according to claim 9, wherein said rifles terminate partially down a portion of the axial length of said body.

15. An arrow comprising: an arrowhead body; a plurality of helical rifles integral to said body; and an attachment means used to mount said body on a contemporary arrow shaft; wherein a portion of said body tapers to a point at one end; wherein said rifles begin at said point and spiral down the longitudinal axis of said body; and wherein all said rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine; and a shaft devoid of fletching, said arrowhead being secured to one end region of said shaft.

16. A broadhead arrow comprising: a ferrule, at least one blade coupled to said ferrule, an attachment means used to mount said broadhead on an arrow shaft, and a tip; wherein said tip further includes a plurality of helical rifles integral to said tip; wherein said tip further includes an attachment means used to mount said tip on said broadhead; wherein a portion of said tip tapers to a point at one end; wherein said rifles begin at said point and spiral down the longitudinal axis of said tip; and wherein all said rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine; and a shaft devoid of fletching, said arrowhead being secured to one end region of said shaft.

17. A broadhead arrowhead comprising: a ferrule having a first end and a second end; at least one deployable blade assembly, each coupled to said ferrule by a pivot shaft; a mounting means for mounting said arrowhead to an arrow shaft; and a tip; wherein said tip further includes a plurality of helical rifles integral to said tip; wherein said tip further includes an attachment means used to mount said tip on said broadhead; wherein a portion of said tip tapers to a point at one end; wherein said rifles begin at said point and spiral down the longitudinal axis of said tip; and wherein all said rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine; wherein said deployable blade assembly further comprises a semi-circular fourth blade portion integral to a first end of an elongated third blade portion, and a flag-shaped fifth blade portion integral to a second end of said third blade portion; wherein said ferrule further comprises a deployable blade slot cut into the side of said ferrule for each said deployable blade assembly; wherein said fourth blade portion fits into said deployable blade slot; wherein said deployable blade slot is substantially coplanar with a longitudinal axis of said ferrule and is of a depth and geometry that permits each said deployable blade to rotate freely about said pivot shaft; wherein said ferrule further comprises a cylindrical cavity that begins at the leading face of said first end of said ferrule and continues down a longitudinal axis of said ferrule to a depth approximately equal to the location of said at least one pivot shaft; wherein said cavity contains a trigger, comprising a solid cylinder such that said trigger can slide freely within said cavity; wherein said trigger includes a trailing surface that interfaces with a ledge on each said fourth blade portion when said deployable blades are in the closed position; and wherein said cavity further contains a mechanical tensioner located between the leading face of said trigger and the trailing edge of said main blade such that said trailing edge of said main blade compresses said tensioner, which in turn urges said trigger in the aft direction.

18. An arrowhead according to claim 17, wherein both said third blade portion and said fourth blade portion are disposed in a plane at least substantially parallel to a longitudinal axis of said ferrule and said fifth blade portion extends at an angle to the plane of said third blade portion; and said fifth blade portion is preferably continuously curved, wherein said deployable blade assembly has an airfoil-type shape.

19. An arrowhead according to claim 18, further comprising a plurality of said deployable blade assemblies disposed substantially symmetrically around the longitudinal axis of said ferrule.

20. An arrowhead according to claim 19, wherein said fifth blade portion has a leading edge region disposed at an angle to said ferrule.

21. An arrowhead according to claim 20, wherein said leading edge region is disposed at an angle to said ferrule in the range of about 5 degrees and about 45 degrees.

22. An arrowhead according to claim 19, wherein said fifth blade portion has a length of between 20% and 50% of the overall length of said deployable blade assembly.

23. An arrowhead according to claim 19, wherein said continuously curved fifth blade portion has a radius of curvature of between about 0.2″ and 0.5″.

24. An arrowhead according to claim 19, further comprising means for limiting the deployment angle of said deployable blade assemblies.

25. An arrowhead according to claim 24, wherein said means limits the maximum deployment angle of said deployable blade assemblies in the range of about 90 degrees and 170 degrees.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to the field of archery. Specifically, the invention relates to arrowheads found on arrow devices.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Arrowheads and their associated aerodynamics are a key element for predictable flight of arrow assemblies. Prior art arrowheads can be broadly divided into two groups: those with little or no aerodynamic effect, such as the common field point, and those that do have a pronounced aerodynamic effect, whether intended or not, such as broadhead arrowheads.

Field point arrowheads are very simple devices that are commonly used for target practice. Field point arrowheads taper from a maximum diameter, equal to approximately the diameter of the arrow shaft, down to a point at the forwardmost end. Some variations of the simple field point geometry include three or four scallops in the field point surface. However these scallops are meant to provide a sharper point for penetration, not influence the aerodynamics of the arrow assembly. This simple point in all its prior art embodiments disturbs the air very little as the arrow assembly flies towards its intended target. A considerable drawback of the prior art field point is that the arrow assembly flight is governed entirely by the aerodynamics of the vanes at the aft end of the arrow. The arrow is essentially pushed through the air. This pushing can cause the flight path of the arrow to wander as the arrow is affected by random influences such as crosswind, oscillating vibration of the arrow shaft, and asymmetries between the arrow vanes. What the prior art lacks is a field point that is itself capable of stabilizing the flight of the arrow assembly.

Broadhead arrowheads were invented to increase effective hunting penetration and success potential. Typically two to four flat, triangular blades are arranged around the forward pointed tip. As the arrowhead enters the intended target, the blades slice a region much greater than a simple field point and increase the probability of inflicting mortal damage upon the intended target. These broad, flat blades have a pronounced aerodynamic effect that can radically affect the overall stability of the arrow in flight and significantly reduce the precision of flight. The forwardmost tip of such broadheads is typically either the flat blade itself, such as in the patents of Newnam (U.S Pat. No. 5,636,845) or Musacchia (U.S. Pat. No. 4,621,817); or the forwardmost tip is a field point-like cap that provides no aerodynamic effect, such as in the patents of Adams, jr. (U.S. Pat. No. 6,077,180) or Martinez, et. al. (U.S. Pat. No. 6,319,161). One recent improvement is the broadhead of Kuhn (U.S. Pat. No. 6,663,518) which employs blades whose geometry imparts an axial rotational spin on the arrow assembly during flight. However, the forwardmost tip of this broadhead is still basically a field point.

Mechanical broadhead arrowheads were developed to address problems associated with traditional bladed broadheads. Mechanical broadheads include deployable bladed or spiny bleeder appendages that remain closely attached to the main body of the arrowhead from release until impact. This reduces the overall aerodynamic effect of large, bladed structures during flight. Upon deployment, such appendages provide greater cutting surfaces and or means for lodging within the wounded target than a simple flat blade. Again, the forwardmost tip of such prior art broadheads is typically a field point-like cap, such as in the patents of Liechty, II (U.S. Pat. No. 6,171,206) and Maleski (U.S. Pat. No. 6,217,467), which provides no aerodynamic effect.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a turbine tip arrowhead, used either strictly as a field point or as the forwardmost tip in concert with any prior art broadhead assembly. The key feature of this turbine tip arrowhead is the geometry, which includes a tapered tip and a plurality of helical rifles, consisting of either grooves or ridges, beginning at the tip of the field point and spiraling back towards the aft end. All rifles spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine. This turbine tip design provides excellent rotation of the arrow shaft during flight without producing a large amount of aerodynamic drag. The invention is compatible with all contemporary arrow shafts.

When used as a replacement for the common field tip-like caps found on prior art broadhead assemblies, the turbine tip of the present invention again provides stabilizing, axial rotation of the arrow regardless of whether or not the broadhead main blades provide any axial rotation themselves. The rifling also inflicts additional damage while augering into the target upon impact. The invention is compatible with all contemporary broadhead assemblies.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows an oblique view of the rifled turbine tip arrowhead of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows an exploded view of the rifled turbine tip arrowhead of the present invention used in concert with a mechanical broadhead arrowhead.

FIG. 3 shows a side view of the rifled turbine tip of the present invention used in concert with a mechanical broadhead arrowhead in the closed position.

FIG. 4 shows a front and sectional view of the rifled turbine tip of the present invention used in concert with a mechanical broadhead arrowhead.

FIG. 5A shows an oblique view of the rifled turbine tip of the present invention used in concert with a mechanical broadhead arrowhead in the closed position.

FIG. 5B shows an oblique view of the rifled turbine tip of the present invention used in concert with a mechanical broadhead arrowhead in the open position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With reference to FIG. 1, field point 1 of this invention comprises a typically cylindrical body 2 with a maximum diameter approximately equal to the maximum diameter of an arrow shaft. Body 2 is typically symmetrical about a longitudinal axis. A portion of body 2 tapers to a point 3 at one end. A plurality of helical rifles 4, consisting of either grooves or ridges, begin at point 3 of the field point 1 and spiral down the longitudinal axis of body 2. Rifles 4 may spiral down the entire axial length of body 2 or may terminate partially down a portion of the axial length of body 2. All rifles 4 spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine. In the preferred embodiment, rifles 4 are placed close together around body 2 so that they contact each other down their entire helical length.

In the preferred embodiment there are between about three and about ten rifles 4 located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of body 2. There are optimally about eight rifles 4 located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of body 2. Too few rifles 4 will not provide enough rotational torque to produce the desired axial flow turbine aerodynamic effect. Too many rifles 4 must be so narrow or small that their aerodynamic effect becomes inconsequential as their aggregate surface approaches that of a smooth field point.

Rifles 4 are defined as grooves if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of body 2 does not exceed the nominal maximum diameter of body 2. In other words, body 2 is tapered continuously from aft to point 3 and rifles 4 are cut into this otherwise smoothly tapered point. Rifles 4 are defined as ridges if the maximum diameter of the rifled portion of body 2 exceeds the nominal maximum diameter of body 2. Typically, rifles 4 will be V-shaped in cross section although other geometries would be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art.

Field point 1 also includes an attachment means 5 used to mount field point 1 on a contemporary arrow shaft. Typically, attachment means 5 comprises a male-threaded post that is received by a female-threaded socket in the arrow shaft. However, attachment to an arrow shaft may comprise any method common in the art such as a press-fitting or gluing. In these embodiments, attachment means 5 of field point 1 may be a smooth socket or other means for mechanical engagement of the arrow shaft. Field point 1 may be made of any suitable material, such as, but not limited to, steel, aluminum, plastic, etc.

One of the features of the field point arrowhead of this invention is its ability to produce stabilized arrow flight without the use of fletching or tail fins (or feathers). The rotation induced in the arrow by the aerodynamically designed turbine tip is sufficient to stabilize the arrow in flight. Eliminating or reducing the size of the fletching in fact improves flight characteristics because the rotational drag normally induced by the fletching is avoided. It should be noted, however, that all embodiments of the arrowhead of the invention can be used with fletched arrow shafts as well.

The standalone point described above may be used in concert with any conventional broadhead. A conventional broadhead, as broadly defined, includes a ferrule, at least one blade coupled to the ferrule, a means for attachment of the broadhead to an arrow shaft, and a tip. In such a case, the cylindrical, pointed tip common on many contemporary broadheads is replaced by a tip having the same rifled geometry as the standalone point of the present invention.

One such novel broadhead, incorporating the turbine tip of the present invention, is described in FIGS. 2 through 5B, broadhead arrowhead assembly 100 includes a rifled tip 101 as an alternate embodiment of the invention. Analogous to the stand-alone field point 1, tip 101 is typically cylindrical in geometry with a maximum diameter at its aft end 104 approximately equal to the mating diameter of the first end portion 108 of broadhead body 107. A portion of tip 101 tapers to a point 102 at one end. A plurality of helical rifles 103, consisting of either grooves or ridges, begin at point 102 of tip 101 and spiral down the longitudinal axis of tip 101. Rifles 103 may spiral down the entire axial length of tip 101 or may terminate partially down the axial length of tip 101. All rifles 103 spiral in the same rotational direction giving the appearance of a turbine. In the preferred embodiment, rifles 103 are placed close together around tip 101 so that they contact each other down their entire helical length. The aft end 104 of tip 101 includes a smooth, hollow socket capable of accepting a tensioner 105 and capable of fitting over part of first end portion 108 in an integral assembly. Mating surfaces of aft end 104 and first end portion 108 may be assembled by press-fitting, swaging, gluing, by complementary threads on the mating surfaces, or by any other means common in the art.

Broadhead arrowhead 100 further comprises a body or ferrule 107. At a first, or proximal, end, ferrule 107 incorporates a first end portion 108. First end portion 108 typically tapers to a reduced diameter at its most proximal end. Ferrule 107 also has a second, or distal, end portion 113. Second end portion 113 is of reduced diameter so that it may fit within the hollow end of a conventional arrow shaft. The aft portion of ferrule 107 may be slightly flared outwardly. It is not necessary that the aft portion of ferrule 107 be flared outwardly, however. As shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 2 through 5B, the aft portion of body 107 may continue substantially straight along its length until the reduced diameter of second end portion 113. Ferrule 107 is typically symmetrical about a longitudinal axis between first end portion 108 and second end portion 113. Arrowhead body 107 may be made of any suitable material, such as, but not limited to, steel, aluminum, plastic, etc.

A mounting stub 114 extends rearwardly from second end portion 113 of arrowhead body 107. Typically, stub 114 is symmetrical about and coaxial with a longitudinal axis. Mounting stub 114, along with second end 113, is intended to fit into a mating recess typically located at one end of a standard arrow shaft. Stub 114 may be threaded to mate with matching threads in the arrow shaft recess or it may be seated in the recess in a press fit arrangement. Alternatively, mounting stub 114 may be glued or otherwise sealed into the mating recess of the arrow shaft.

In other variations of mounting means, instead of a stub 114, second end 113 of body 107 may be of diameter equal to or greater than that of an arrow shaft. Second end 113 may then be hollowed out to fit over said arrow shaft. In such an arrangement, the inside of hollow second end 113 may be threaded to mate with threads on the outer surface of the arrow shaft; or distal second end 113 may be press fit over the arrow shaft. Alternatively, second end 113 may be fitted over the end of the arrow shaft and glued or otherwise sealed to the arrow shaft.

A second key feature of broadhead arrowhead 100 is the inclusion of mechanically deployable blades 121 including an inertial trigger mechanism that both inhibits premature deployment during release and flight yet also facilitates deployment during impact with the intended target. Such a trigger is also found in the pending application of Kuhn (U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/766,664). Each deployable blade 121 comprises an elongated third blade portion 123 that is sharpened on the side adjacent to body 107 when in the closed position. Integral to a first end of third blade portion 123 is a semi-circular, cam-shaped fourth blade portion 120. Integral to a second end of third blade portion 123 is a flag-shaped fifth blade portion 124. Fifth blade portion 124 comprises between about 20% and 50% of the total length of deployable blade 121.

Both elongated third blade portion 123 and integral cam-shaped fourth blade portion 120 are disposed in a plane at least substantially parallel to a longitudinal axis of body 107. Flag-shaped fifth blade portion 124 extends from third blade portion 123 at an angle thereto. Fifth blade portion 124 is preferably continuously curved, with a radius of curvature optimally between about 0.2″ and 0.5″, giving the blade the characteristics of an airfoil. The radius of curvature may vary over the surface of the blade. In the preferred embodiment, fifth blade portion 124 curves out of the plane of third blade portion 123 at a constant radius of curvature. The resultant leading edge region of fifth blade portion 124 is disposed at an angle to body 107 and also at an angle to third blade portion 123. This angle may be as great as 45 degrees or more, but optimally it is the range between approximately 5 and 5 degrees and most optimally in the range between approximately 5 and 25 degrees. In the closed position, fifth blade portion 124 resembles a swept forward wing.

Broadhead assembly 100 includes at least one associated deployable blade 121 and preferably three deployable blades 121. Cam-shaped fourth blade portion 120 fits into a deployable blade slot 110, which is cut into the side of ferrule body 107. Deployable blade slot 110 is substantially coplanar with a longitudinal axis of body 107 and is of a depth and geometry that permits deployable blade 121 to rotate freely about a pivot shaft 112 between the open position and the closed position as shown particularly in FIG. 5A and FIG. 5B. In the preferred embodiment, pivot shaft 112 is a removable screw that permits easy replacement of deployable blade 121. Pivot shaft 112 is preferably perpendicular to the major plane of cam-shaped fourth blade portion 120. Deployable blades 121 and pivot screws 112 may be made of any suitable material, such as, but not limited to, steel, aluminum, plastic, etc.

As shown in the preferred embodiment in FIG. 4, deployable blade slots 110 and their associated deployable blades 121 are preferrably disposed substantially symmetrically around body 107 at an angle θ from each other when broadhead assembly 101 is viewed from the front.

Each of the fifth blade assembly portions 124 are angled out of the plane of their respective third blade portion 123 in the same rotational direction as shown in FIG. 4. Fifth portions 124 of deployable blades 121, acting together with rifles 103 of tip 101, form an axial-flow turbine. It will be understood by those skilled in the art that all rifles 103 and fifth blade assembly portions 124 are preferably angled in the same rotational direction to promote stable flight.

FIG. 4 shows rifles 103 and fifth portions 124 of deployable blades 121 angled clockwise when viewed from the front. Alternatively, rifles 103 and fifth portions 124 of deployable blades 121 can be angled counterclockwise when viewed from the front.

Ferrule 107 further comprises an inertial trigger mechanism that both inhibits premature deployment of deployable blades 121 during release and flight, yet also promotes deployment of deployable blades 121 during impact with a target. Cylindrical cavity 109 begins at the leading face of the first end 108 of body 107 and continues down the longitudinal axis of body 107 to a depth approximately equal to the location of pivot shafts 112. The diameter of cylindrical cavity 109 is preferably in the range of 20% and 80% of the diameter of tip 101 and most preferably in the range of 25% and 50% of the diameter of tip 101. Cylindrical cavity 109 is symmetrical about the longitudinal axis of body 107.

Trigger 106 comprises a solid cylinder of outer diameter slightly less than the inner diameter of cylindrical cavity 109 such that trigger 106 can slide freely within cylindrical cavity 109 without binding or becoming cocked. Trigger 106 includes a trailing surface that interfaces with ledges 122 on both cam-shaped fourth blade portions 120 when deployable blades 121 are in the closed position. In the preferred embodiment, trigger 106 is a normal, right cylinder with walls perpendicular to its flat trailing surface. In this embodiment, ledges 122 are also flat so that they contact trigger 106 along their entire length when deployable blades 121 are rotated into the closed position. Trigger 106 may be made of any suitable material, such as, but not limited to, steel, aluminum, plastic, etc. Trigger 106 may also be coated with a lubricant, such as graphite, silicone oil, mineral oil, polytetrafluoroethylene, etc., in order to inhibit friction or binding along the inner surface of cylindrical cavity 109.

A mechanical tensioner 105 is located between the leading face of trigger 106 and the socketed aft end 104 of tip 101 and within cylindrical cavity 109. When tip 101 is integrated into broadhead assembly 100, the socketed aft end 104 of tip 101 compresses tensioner 105, which in turn urges trigger 106 in the aft direction and down upon ledges 122 of deployable blades 121. Tensioner 105 may comprise a coiled spring, a plug of reversibly compressible material, such as solid silicone, a collapsible volume filled with a compressible fluid, or any other means for storing mechanical energy that would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art.

During release and flight, inertial forces act to relieve compression on tensioner 105, thereby further urging trigger 106 in the aft direction and firmly retaining deployable blades 121 in the closed position by pressing firmly upon ledges 122. In the closed position, third blade portions 123 of deployable blades 121 are in close contact with the sides of ferrule body 107. Flag-shaped fifth blade portions 124 are disposed at angles laterally outward away from the sides of body 107.

During impact, flag-shaped fifth portions 124 of deployable blades 121 are forced laterally outward by contact with the surface of the target. At the same time, as rapid deceleration of the broadhead is occurring, trigger 106 is urged forward away from ledges 122 thereby compressing tensioner 105. The combination of torque applied by fifth blade portions 124 contact with the target and relieved rearward pressure applied by trigger 106 permits deployable blades 121 to overcome the engagement between ledges 122 and trigger 106 and rotate about pivot screws 112 toward the rear as shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 5B.

The angle of deployment is limited by eventual contact between deployable blades 121 with ring 115. In the preferred embodiment, the maximum angle of deployment for blades 121 is preferably in the range of approximately 90 degrees and 170 degrees and more preferably in the range of approximately 100 degrees and 135 degrees as measured from the closed position. In the closed position, third blade portions 123 lie alongside body 107 and parallel to the longitudinal axis of body 107.

In the embodiment shown, ring 115 comprises a flat, annular device with an inner diameter equal to the outer diameter of second end 113 of body 107 and an outer diameter equal to the outer diameter of body 107. Ring 115 is placed over second end 113 prior to attaching second end 113 to an arrow shaft. Alternatively, ring 115 can be mechanically attached to body 107 by any means common in the art such as welding or adhesive bonding. Ring 115 may also be integrally formed along with body 107. Ring 115 may be made from any material such as steel, aluminum, plastic, etc., although metal is used in the preferred embodiment.

One of the features of the arrowhead of this invention is its ability to produce stabilized arrow flight without the use of fletching or tail fins (or feathers). The rotation induced in the arrow by the aerodynamically designed turbine tip used in combination with the deployable blades is sufficient to stabilize the arrow in flight. Eliminating or reducing the size of the fletching in fact improves flight characteristics because the rotational drag normally induced by the fletching is avoided. It should be noted, however, that all embodiments of the arrowhead of the invention can be used with all fletched arrow shafts as well.

While various embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not limitation. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and their equivalents.