Title:
Use of helium/nitrogen gas mixtures in up to 12kW laser welding
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Binary gas mixture for welding using a laser beam of up to 12 kW, consisting of 30% to 60% nitrogen by volume, the remainder (up to 100%) being helium. Application of this gas mixture to the welding of steel, stainless steel or titanium.



Inventors:
Briand, Francis (Paris, FR)
Chouf, Karim (Epinay s/seine, FR)
Lefebvre, Philippe (Saint Ouen I'Aumone, FR)
Verna, Eric (Boissy l'Aillerie, FR)
Application Number:
11/265647
Publication Date:
04/20/2006
Filing Date:
11/02/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
252/575
International Classes:
B23K26/00; B23K26/20; B23K26/12; B23K26/14; B23K26/32; B23K35/38
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
ELVE, MARIA ALEXANDRA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Elwood Haynes (Houston, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. 1-10. (canceled)

11. A binary gas mixture for laser beam welding consisting of 30% to 60% nitrogen by volume, and the rest being helium (up to 100 vol. %).

12. The mixture of claim 1, containing less than 59 vol. % nitrogen.

13. The mixture of claim 1, containing less than 58 vol. % nitrogen.

14. The mixture of claim 1, containing more than 50 vol. % nitrogen.

15. The mixture of claim 1, containing more than 52 vol. % nitrogen.

16. The mixture of claim 1, containing 53 to 55 vol. % nitrogen.

Description:

This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 10/457,671 filed on Jun. 9, 2003.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to a gas mixture formed solely from helium and nitrogen and to its use in a laser welding process operating at a maximum power of 12 kW.

Laser beam welding is a very high-performance joining process as it makes it possible to obtain, at high speeds, very great penetration depths compared with other more conventional processes, such as plasma welding, MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding or TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding.

This is explained by the high power densities involved when focusing the laser beam by one or more mirrors or lenses in the joint plane of the workpieces to be welded, for example power densities that may exceed 106 W/cm2.

These high power densities cause considerable vaporization at the surface of the workpieces which, expanding to the outside, induces progressive cratering of the weld pool and results in the formation of a narrow and deep vapour capillary called a keyhole in the thickness of the plates, that is to say in the joint plane.

This capillary allows the energy of the laser beam to be directly deposited depthwise in the plate, as opposed to the more conventional welding processes in which the energy deposition is localized on the surface.

In this regard, the following documents may be cited: DE-A-2 713 904, DE-A-4 034 745, JP-A-01048692, JP-A-56122690, WO 97/34730, JP-A-01005692, DE-A-4 123 716, JP-A-02030389, U.S. Pat. No. 4,871,897, JP-A-230389, JP-A-62104693, JP-A-15692, JP-A-15693, JP-A-15694, JP-A-220681, JP-A-220682, JP-A-220683, WO-A-88/01553, WO-A-98/14302, DE-A-3 619 513 and DE-A-3 934 920.

This capillary is formed from a metal vapour/metal vapour plasma mixture, the particular feature of which is that it absorbs the laser beam and therefore traps the energy within the actual capillary.

One of the problems with laser welding is the formation of a shielding gas plasma.

This is because the metal vapour plasma, by seeding the shielding gas with free electrons, may bring about the appearance of a shielding gas plasma which is prejudicial to the welding operation.

The incident laser beam may therefore be greatly disturbed by the shielding gas plasma.

The interaction of the shielding gas plasma with the laser beam may take various forms but it usually results in an effect whereby the incident laser beam is absorbed and/or diffracted and this may lead to a substantial reduction in the effective laser power density at the surface of the target, resulting in a reduction in the penetration depth, or even in a loss of coupling between the beam and the material and therefore a momentary interruption in the welding process.

The power density threshold at which the plasma appears depends on the ionization potential of the shielding gas used and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser beam.

Thus, it is very difficult to weld under pure argon with a CO2-type laser, whereas this operation may be carried out with very much less of a problem with a YAG-type laser.

In general, in CO2 laser welding, helium is used as shielding gas, this being a gas with a high ionization potential and making it possible to prevent the appearance of the shielding gas plasma, and to do so up to a laser power of at least 45 kW.

However, helium has the drawback of being an expensive gas and many laser users prefer to use other gases or gas mixtures that are less expensive than helium but which would nevertheless limit the appearance of the shielding gas plasma and therefore obtain welding results similar to those obtained with helium, but at a lower cost.

Thus, gas mixtures are commercially available that contain argon and helium, for example the gas mixture containing 30% helium by volume and the rest being argon, sold under the name LASAL™ 2045 by L'Air Liquide™, which make it possible to achieve substantially the same results as helium, for CO2 laser power levels below 5 kW and provided that the power densities generated are not too high, that is to say above about 2000 kW/cm2.

However, the problem that arises with this type of Ar/He mixture is that, for higher laser power densities, it is no longer suitable as the threshold at which the shielding gas plasma is created is then exceeded.

Moreover, it is also paramount for the penetration of the weld beads to be at least maintained, or even preferably increased, relative to the same laser welding process using helium.

Furthermore, yet another problem lies in the formation of NOx-type species, harmful to the welder, which must be kept as low as possible.

This is because the metal plasma temperatures, resulting from laser/material interactions as strong as those involved in laser welding, are conducive to the dissociation of nitrogen and oxygen molecules coming from air contamination and lead to the formation of harmful NOx-type species.

Consequently, to avoid or reduce the production of NOx-type species, it is essential to be able to reduce the temperature of the metal plasma resulting from laser welding.

The object of the present invention is therefore to provide a welding gas mixture based on nitrogen and a laser welding process using this gas, able to be used with a laser having a power of up to 12 kW, which gas leads to the formation of a less hot metal plasma, with a total penetration from 5 to 10% greater than that obtained with the conventional gases used for such power levels, namely helium, depending on the power and the nitrogen content of the gas, and to a reduction in the formation of NOx compared with helium by itself.

The solution of the invention is therefore a binary gas mixture for welding using a laser beam of up to 12 kW, consisting of 30% to 60% nitrogen by volume, the remainder (up to 100%) being helium.

SUMMARY

In one aspect of the present invention a binary gas mixture for laser beam welding is provided. This binary gas mixture includes 30% to 60% nitrogen by volume, and the rest being helium (up to 100 vol. %). In another aspect of the present invention the binary gas mixture includes less than 59 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention the binary gas mixture includes less than 58 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes more than 50 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes more than 52 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes 53 to 55 vol. % nitrogen.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In one aspect of the present invention a binary gas mixture for laser beam welding is provided. This binary gas mixture includes 30% to 60% nitrogen by volume, and the rest being helium (up to 100 vol. %). In another aspect of the present invention the binary gas mixture includes less than 59 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention the binary gas mixture includes less than 58 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes more than 50 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes more than 52 vol. % nitrogen. In another aspect of the present invention, the binary gas mixture includes 53 to 55 vol. % nitrogen.

Depending on the case, the gas of the invention may include one or more of the following technical features:

    • it contains less than 59% nitrogen by volume, preferably less than 58% nitrogen, preferably less than 55%;
    • it contains more than 50% nitrogen, preferably more than 52% nitrogen;
    • it preferably contains 53 to 55% nitrogen.

According to another aspect, the invention also relates to a welding process using a laser beam having a power ranging up to 12 kW, in which a gas mixture according to the invention is used for welding steel, stainless steel or titanium workpieces.

Depending on the case, the process of the invention may include one or more of the following technical features:

    • the laser is of the CO2 type;
    • a welding operation is carried out to join two workpieces to be welded together with at least partial penetration, preferably full penetration;
    • a laser having a power from 0.5 to 12 kW, preferably between 4 and 10 kW, is used;
    • workpieces having a thickness ranging from 0.4 to 30 mm, preferably from 1 mm to 10 mm, are welded;
    • the workpieces are made of HYS (High Yield Strength) steel;
    • the workpieces to be welded have a zinc surface coating, particularly galvanized or electrogalvanized steel plates;
    • the workpieces to be welded are placed together and lap or butt welded, by backside welding or at an angle, and with or without a bevel;
    • the welding takes place with a single- or multiple-spot focal spot (impact);
    • the focal spot is circular or oblong;
    • the gas flow rate is between 5 l/min and 100 l/min;
    • the pressure of the gas is between 1 and 5 bar; and
    • the nozzle delivering the gas is a lateral or axial nozzle having a diameter ranging from 3 to 30 mm.

EXAMPLE

Measurement of the Penetration of Lines of Melting Produced with a CO2 Laser and Shielding Gases Formed from He/N2 Mixtures

The curves in the appended figure show measurements of the penetration of lines of melting produced with a CO2-type laser (for power levels ranging from 8 kW to 12 kW) focused on the surface of a metal target made of mild steel by a parabolic mirror possessing a focal length of 200 mm, and for variable helium and nitrogen contents of the shielding gas.

More precisely, the shielding gas was formed from He/N2 mixtures having a progressively increased nitrogen content (the remainder of the mixture being only helium).

For each curve, the nitrogen content of the mixture used is plotted as a percentage by volume on the x-axis.

The gas was delivered in the interaction zone by a lateral nozzle of cylindrical shape with a diameter of 12 mm, at a flow rate of 24 l/min. The welding speed was 3 m/min.

It may be seen in the curves appended hereto that the penetration of the weld beads is at least maintained for laser power levels of between 8 and 12 kW; in some cases, an increase in the penetration of the beads of around 5 to 10% is even observed.

During production of these beads, it was found that a “plasma” and/or “plume” forms in the shielding gas above the interaction zone and above the metal plasma plume. The dimensions of the shielding gas plasma and/or plume depended on the nitrogen content of the mixture, on the incident laser power density, on the focal length and on the welding speed. A priori, it may have large dimensions, ranging up to several centimetres.

It seems that the formation of this plasma and/or plume in the shielding gas is associated with the presence of nitrogen molecules and/or atoms near the interaction zone. The associated consequences of the presence of this gas plasma and/or plume around the interaction zone are different from those observed in the case of He/Ar mixtures.

This is because, unlike He/Ar mixtures in which the ionization of the argon atoms during the laser welding process result in the formation of a plasma in the shielding gas which could be deleterious to the laser welding process, the gas plasma and/or plume obtained with He/N2 mixtures does not impair the welding process.

In the case of He/N2 mixtures, the coupling between the material and the laser beam is maintained, or sometimes even improved. Only high nitrogen contents in the He/N2 mixture significantly impair the laser/material coupling.

The improvement in the penetration seems to result from the cooling of the metal plasma plume induced by the dissociation of the nitrogen molecules of the mixture in contact with it.

This would therefore lead to a reduction in the size of the metal plasma plume at the surface of the plate and to a reduction in the phenomenon of absorption of the incident laser beam by the plume and an increase in the amount of laser energy available at the surface of the plate and in the capillary.

In addition, the exothermic recombination of the nitrogen atoms or ions at the surface of the walls of the capillary must also contribute to improving the process.

Furthermore, it has also been demonstrated during tests using He/N2 mixtures that there is an appreciable reduction in the amount of NOx generated, depending on the nitrogen contents and laser power densities involved, compared with the amount of NOx generated with helium alone.

This is because the dissociation of nitrogen molecules, when injected into the laser/material interaction zone, absorbs some of the energy of the metal plasma and cools it.

This partly explains the reduction in the formation of NOx species around the metal plasma plume during laser welding in the laser welding process.

The content of NOx emitted during the laser welding process carried out at a speed of about 3 m/min for laser power levels of 2 kW and 8 kW was measured. The shielding gas was brought in laterally to the displacement by a nozzle 8 mm in diameter at 20 l/min. Various He/N2 mixtures were used. The sampling was effected by a stainless steel probe 3 mm in diameter, which sucked up all the gases emitted by the welding process. The gases collected then passed into a standardized analyser capable of detecting the NOx-type elements and of determining their proportions. The sampling probe was positioned 2 cm from the surface of the plate, 1.5 cm from the interaction zone, in the extension of the gas flow.

The measurements carried out are given in the following table.

TABLE
He/N2 mixtures100%/070%/30%50%/50%30%/70%0/100%
(kW)\(ppm)NONOxNONOxNONOxNONOxNONOx
2 kW13.513.52.12.41.31.4
8 kW70.870.840.640.633.633.522

It may be seen that there is an appreciable reduction in the contents of NOx emitted during the laser welding process when the nitrogen content of the He/N2 shielding gas mixture increases.

It will be understood that many additional changes in the details, materials, steps and arrangement of parts, which have been herein described in order to explain the nature of the invention, may be made by those skilled in the art within the principle and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. Thus, the present invention is not intended to be limited to the specific embodiments in the examples given above.