Title:
Wheel blade sight
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a single unit archery bow sighting device which contains the front and rear sight reticles and mounts on the riser of all types of archery equipment. The rear sight is pivotally mounted reticles of blade wheel type construction with a plurality of sight blades providing a plurality of range settings. The blades are locked into the wheel by set screws by which each blade may be adjusted in elevation individually. The front sight blade has dual purpose both as a sighting device and a range finder. There is an eye screw under the front sight blade to which a measure of thread is attached. The wind's influence on this thread which hangs below the sight assists in reading the wind velocity and direction for accuracy in target shooting as well as for stalking prey.



Inventors:
Lace, Charles Robert (Lyons, IN, US)
Application Number:
10/968226
Publication Date:
04/20/2006
Filing Date:
10/19/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41G1/467
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FULTON, CHRISTOPHER W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHARLES ROBERT LACE (LYONS, IN, US)
Claims:
1. The invention provides a single frame archery bow sight consisting of a front sight mounted to the frame. Any blade type front sight aperture type can be used in the mount and is adjustable for windage. The said front sight blade doubles as a range finder for deer hunting by comparing its height with that of a deer.

2. The said invention provides a blade wheel type rear sight consisting of a plurality of wheel sight blades which are rotated into shooting position by manually turning the said wheel which is automatically locked into place by a spring ball locking device. Each said wheel sight blade is adjustable to a different height from the axis and represents different preset shooting yardages. The said sight blades may be substituted with blades of different reticle types or heights. The said invention provides a said bow sight with an unobstructed sight picture that adapts to archery bows, such as long bows, semi-recurve bows, recurve bows and compound bows.

3. The said invention is adaptable to either right handed or left handed bows since said invention is the same on both sides. Pre-existing sight mounts on left handed or right handed bows will readily accommodate said invention.

4. The said invention provides an eye screw under the said front sight reticle attached to the said frame to which a measure of thread may be attached to assist in reading wind direction and estimating wind velocity for assistance in stalking and shooting.

5. The said invention provides that every surface of the said sight's reticles are cut, filed or ground so that said surfaces used in said sighting reflects light glare away from the eye as it aligns said sight with the target. This prevents reflected light from distorting said sight picture.

6. The invention provides that when a left handed shooter shoots a right handed compound bow with said invention as if it were a said left handed bow, bow string slap to the inside forearm is totally eliminated due to the protection provided by the crossing cables of the said compound bow and vice versa.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The invention relates to bow sights.

Much of the Prior Art of bow sighting involves many elements to constitute a sighting device. One of the elements is a front sight body containing sight pins with different apertures. These pins mount and are adjustable by manipulating two nuts on threaded holder which changes and locks their position to the front sight body. This device generally contains multiple pins or posts allowing for sight settings of differing ranges. They are delicate and fragile and require a protective shield. This paraphernalia clutters the sight window.

Another element is a rear sight consisting of a peep sight entwined with the bowstring or a similar device attached to the bowstring. A rubber tube is attached to the bow riser and to the peep sight body. The purpose of this arm and rubber tube is to cause the peep sight hole to align so that it may be sighted through at full draw.

Other elements are: a lip button which is mounted to the bowstring to allow the shooter to come to the same anchor point when the string is released. Forward counter weights called stabilizers are sometimes mounted on the bow body for stabilization which assist is sighting accuracy. The inclusion of all these devices demonstrate the difficulty of the Prior Art of sighting. Bow sights, which do not place the rear sight on the bowstring, mount the entire sight on the riser. One example is a scope sight which is aligned by looking through the scope and locating one of the dots or crosshairs and aligning them on the desired target. Scopes and mounts are heavy and expensive and are not allowed in Open Sight Competition.

2. Description of the Related Art

Lorocco presents a sighting device for guns which is mounted on the barrel and a scope type sight for archery equipment in U.S. Pat. No. 5,638,604 Jun. 17, 1997. Lorocco makes no provision for adaptation of the barrel mounted sight to archery equipment. He even states that for archery equipment, a scope sight is used.

Deien introduces a compound bow rifle sight system with Pat. Application Ser. No. 2004/0088872A1 May 13, 2004; however, the rear V-type rifle sight introduced is an add on unit which requires a separately mounted front sight which is of the multiple pin type in which multiple pins are used for different yardages. The almost unlimited view defined would only apply to unlimited when the shortest range pin was used. All other range sightings would have one or several pins protruding above the top surface of the rear V sight as the uppermost front pin represents the shortest distance. The view would also be restricted by the protective cover that pin type sights require due to their fragile construction. All range selections would depend on a multiple pin front sight which can cause confusion of selecting ranges and obstruction of the sight field.

McNeel describes an archery bow sight with U.S. Pat. No. 3,058,221 Aug. 15, 1960 which has either a peep or pin rear sight and a multi-lined front sight. The pin sight on the rear creates a problem. The closer that pin is to the eye, the larger the portion of the target it hides from view and this would hamper pin point aiming. The peep sight causes somewhat similar problems in that the closer the peep is to the eye, the smaller the peep hole needs to be for accurate aiming and the smaller the hole, the more difficult the front aperture is to locate for aiming. The multi-pin front aperture introduces the potential for confusion and certainly a restricted field of view in the sight picture.

Hanson describes a bow sight in U.S. Pat. No. 03,063,151 Nov. 13, 1962. Hanson's designed sight is capable of almost any adjustment with time and tools being the limiting factor. Hanson's design does not provide multiple sight range selections to be quickly selected which are range features needed in hunting situations and desirable in any kind of shooting.

Kenny, Nelson describes an adjustable bow sight in U.S. Pat. No. 5,718,215 Feb. 17, 1998. It has gears to potentially malfunction, or become jammed with woodland debris or develop mechanical problems or freeze in snow or ice or wear out. The necessity to focus one's attention on the range setting lever and selector marks to change the range settings and the expense of construction should cause this sight to fail the advantages of the invention, without consideration of wind reading and range estimation provision of the invention. Also, this sight could only be used on a right handed bow.

Kalmbach describes a sighting device for archery bows in U.S. Pat. No. 4,159,575 Jul. 3, 1979. Kalmbach's sight presents a disc rear sight with multiple peep apertures, selectable to present multiple peep holes which represent different ranges to be rotated into a position for use. The front sight is a vertical pin U.S. Pat. No. 5,201,124 adjusted by selecting a proper alignment hole and threading it to the proper height. The peep hole type sight presents sight and alignment problems due to impaired vision. The front bead must be aligned perfectly centered in the rear peep hole. This is difficult and tedious. If the bow moves the least, the entire sight picture can be lost.

Sprandel describes an archery sight and range finder in U.S. Pat. No. 3,666,368 May 30, 1972. This device brackets the target and sights with a center reference point provided on one of the bracketing sight bars. It has a pivoting finger slot with which to accomplish the range and sight adjustment. This sight requires many functions to work. Assuming nothing jams and everything works, a steady finger is required while the same hand must hold and steady a bow while under the pressure of the bow's forty pounds plus of pull pressure. The target must be completely visible in order to be bracketed. This device is extremely complicated with many potential disappointing outcomes. The longevity of this device is certainly limited.

Kocur describes a coordinated bow sight and range finder in U.S. Pat. No. 2,767,472 Oct. 23, 1956. Kocur offers a front multiple pin type sight with adjustable front pins in which screws are used as the pins and the heads of the screws are used as the sight beads. The range finder is described as an adjustable upper and lower span whereby the lower span is aligned horizontally at the feet of the intended target while the bow is held at arm's length in shooting position. The upper span is then slid up or down in order to align it horizontally on the back of the animal. The pointer will designate the distance on the range scale which is either marked in yardages or color codes to match with the pins on the front sight. This range finder is tedious and requires one's full attention during manipulation. Kocur's sight does not provide an unrestricted sight picture. Confusion and error are definitely a threat in usage.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

After much research and study of the Prior Art devices, the present invention has been developed by building and testing prototypes to provide a bow sight which contains all components of a bow sight in one unit. As a result, this one unit sight provides:

A. An unobstructed sight picture, visible and distinct;

B. Quick multi-range sight adjustments by rotation of the blade wheel into pre-set detent lock positions;

C. Simple and inexpensive sight mounting bracket included with the sight;

D. A windage estimation device;

E. A range finding capability.

In view of the above, it is an object of the invention to be adapted as a novel sighting apparatus and to allow quick, accurate sighting of a bow so that an arrow may be caused to impact a desired point.

Another object of the invention is to provide a bow sight which may be adjusted to multiple pre-selected ranges.

An additional object of the invention is that the front sight blade doubles as a sight reticle and a range finder.

Another object of the invention is to provide a bow sight having a rear sight of blade wheel type construction. Each blade on the wheel is a different pre-determined height from the axis providing multiple range selections. Each blade may be provided with any reticle or aperture type desired. Each blade is adjustable by its mounting pin and locking screw. Each blade may be supplied with light collecting devices to enhance low light usage and different aperture types may be used for different distances as they are interchangeable on the wheel.

A further object of the invention is to provide a bow sight with a completely unobstructed sight window. None of the sight's parts are in the field of the sight window except the two sight blades that are selected for use at the desired range.

An additional object of the invention is that the sight adjustment may be performed without releasing the bow gripping hand. The adjustment is made by the hand which pulls the bowstring.

Another object of the invention is that it can be assembled as a left handed or right handed sight with only a four screw change.

A further object of the invention is to provide a sight that due to its rugged construction and strong materials and lack of gears or other delicate parts is nearly failure proof and does not need guards or helps such as levels, lip buttons or bowstring peeps.

Another object of the invention is that it provides an eye screw directly under the front sight reticle in the sight base. From this eye screw, a measure of thread may be hanged. This thread will provide wind direction determination and wind velocity estimation which may assist in shooting and stalking.

A further object of the invention is that it allows a left handed or right handed bow to be shot from either side due to the bowstring not being involved in the sighting procedure. This allows one to shoot from either side without turning around should the quarry approach from an unexpected direction One may shoot either left handed or right handed with the same bow.

An additional object of the invention is that a left handed archer shooting a right handed compound bow or vice versa eliminates the possibility of the bow string slapping the forearm as the cross cables of the compound bow protects the forearm from string slap and eliminates the need for a forearm guard. It is even preferable for a right hander to use a left handed bow and vice versa for that reason.

A simple object of the invention is to provide a bow sight that mounts so simply that it does not require expensive, fragile and complicated mounting brackets and even provides as part of the sight, its own mount which attaches by two screws to mount holes provided by nearly all bow manufacturers as standard mounting screw holes and mounts the sight so that it is more rigid than other mounting methods.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is an assembled view from above looking downward onto the invention including the bow mounting bracket provided with the sight;

FIG. 2A is the assembled view from the left side of the invention including the bow mounting bracket;

FIG. 3A is the assembled view from underneath looking upward to the invention including the mounting bracket;

FIG. 4A is the assembled view from the right side of the invention including the mounting bracket;

FIG. 5A is the exploded view from 45 degrees front left of the invention including the bow mounting bracket;

FIG. 6A is the exploded view of bare main base and bow mount bracket;

FIG. 7A is the exploded view of the wheel blade assembly shown with blades and mounting systems;

FIG. 8A is the invention mounted to a bow using supplied mounts viewed from the right side on a right handed bow;

FIG. 9A is the view of the sight picture involving the wheel blade sight and the front sight blade;

FIG. 10A is the square notched wheel sight blade with low light filament holes showing that the sight surfaces angle away from shooter;

FIG. 10B is the V-notched wheel sight blade showing that sight surfaces angle away from shooter;

FIG. 10C is the round peep type wheel sight blade showing that coned sight surfaces angle away from shooter;

FIG. 10D is the square peep type wheel sight blade with cross reticle showing sight surfaces angle away from shooter;

FIG. 11A is the post type front sight blade with low light filament hole and showing that sight surfaces angle away from the shooter and the range estimating features;

FIG. 11B is the bead type front sight blade;

FIG. 11C is the bracketed type front sight blade showing that sight surfaces angle away from shooter;

FIG. 11D is the reverse side of FIG. 11A showing multiple range lines 51 used only for denoting ranges greater than twenty yards.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

There has been thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the Art may be better appreciated. There are additional features of the invention that will be described hereinafter and which will from the subject matter of the claims appended hereto. In this respect, before explaining at least one embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The drawing figures start at 1A and contain a letter and the invention's embodiment features start at 20 to allow no confusion between drawing numbers, page numbers and invention's embodiment feature numbers. If there are less than 19 drawing figures, some of the first 19 numbers may not be represented;

The invention being a bow sight FIG. 1A, FIG. 2A, FIG. 3A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A is conventionally mounted in the sight window of a bow 53 FIG. 8A so that it aligns parallel with an arrow 52 FIG. 8A that is nocked in the bow in shooting position approximately two inches below the sight;

The invention's features are as numbered on the drawings: a set screw 20 FIG. 1A, FIG. 3A, FIG. 5A and threaded hole 21 FIG. 1A are provided in order to lock the front sight blade 22 FIG. 1A, FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A into the front sight slot 23 FIG. 5A which is cut into the main sight frame 24 FIG. 1A, FIG. 3A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A.

Attached to main frame 24 by bolt 30 FIG. 5A through threaded hole 31 FIG. 5A in main frame 24 FIG. 5A and wheel frame 29 FIG. 5A. This connection bolt 30 FIG. 5A, FIG. 8A provides an adjustable connection for elevation changes for initial sight orientation. The elevation of the shortest distance selected for a sight blade will be adjusted by manipulation of the joint formed by the connection of main frame 24 FIG. 5A and wheel frame 29 FIG. 5A. The remainder of sight blades 32 will be adjusted in elevation by the manipulation of raising a sight blade 32 to its desired height above sight blade wheel 36 FIG. 5A and locking it in place in sight blade holes 33 FIG. 5A by tightening the sight blade set screws 34 FIG. 7A into sight blade set screw holes 35 FIG. 7A thereby locking sight blade 32 in its desired height on sight blade wheel 36 FIG. 7A. The elevated position of the rear sight blades 32 FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A allows the front sight blade 22 FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A to double in use as a range finder because it allows the front sight blade 22 FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A to be as tall as needed to be used as a stationary reference. The sight mount bracket 25 FIG. 1A, FIG. 2A, FIG. 3A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A, FIG. 6A is connected to the main frame 24 FIG. 5A by two screws 26 FIG. 5A through four anchor bolt holes 40 FIG. 6A.

The blade wheel 36 FIG. 5A, FIG. 7A, FIG. 9A is mounted to the blade wheel frame 29 FIG. 5A by bolt 37 FIG. 5A through the blade wheel mount hole 38 FIG. 7A and the wheel frame wheel mount hole 39 FIG. 5A. The wheel is locked in its sight position by a detent spring ball pin 42 FIG. 5A through threaded detent pin hole 43 FIG. 5A into locking notches 44 FIG. 7A on sight wheel 36 FIG. 5A, FIG. 7A. Any of the wheel sight blades 32 may be locked into sighting position by this process of rotating the wheel until the detent pin locks. Every feature on the wheel is identical on both sides of the wheel so that it can be used either left or right handed. The invention provides an eye screw 41 FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A under the main frame 24 FIG. 1A, FIG. 3A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A under front sight blade 22 FIG. 2A, FIG. 4A, FIG. 5A to which a measure of thread may be attached to help determine wind direction and wind velocity;

The multiple range selections provided by sight blades 32 FIG. 5A when rotated into different blade pre-selected positions will be locked into place by detent spring 42 FIG. 5A locking into notches 44 FIG. 7A, locking the selected sight blade into sighting position for the specific pre-selected range desired.

The invention provides a range finding ability. With the bow held in shooting position by aligning the tip 45 FIG. 11D of the front sight blade 22 FIG. 11D to the top edge of a deer's back and aligning 46 FIG. 11D the top edge of sight base 47 FIG. 11D with the bottom edge of a deer's belly, this will indicate the deer to be at twenty yards. If a deer's torso height does not fill the distance from 45 to 46 of front sight blade 22 FIG. 11D, the range is greater than twenty yards. This is where lines 51 FIG. 11D will be used. If this distance from 45 to 46 FIG. 11D is less than the thickness of a deer's torso, the distance is less than twenty yards. Multiple range lines 51 FIG. 11D can be made on the rear visible edge of the front sight blade 22 FIG. 11D below the tip 45 FIG. 11D to denote longer than twenty yard ranges. These lines would represent the top edge to align on a deer's back for as many yardages as desired. Due to eye differences of shooters, each shooter will need to provide these lines to fit their individual eyesight by trial and error method;

The type of reticles FIG. 10A, FIG. 10B, FIG. 10C, FIG. 10D wheel sight blades and FIG. 11A, FIG. 11B, FIG. 11C, FIG. 11D front sight blades are sight options not limited to these examples and other types may be used by easily interchanging blades on the wheel simply by loosening set screws 34 FIG. 7A and changing to a different type blade in the wheel and tightening set screw 34 FIG. 7A into set screw hole 35 FIG. 7A.

The range settings are selected by rotating the blade wheel 36 FIG. 5A until desired shooting blade is in shooting position and locked into position by detent pin lock ball 42 FIG. 5A locking into detent pin slot 44 FIG. 7A.

The drawing numbers and features not yet defined are defined here for explanation of construction and operation. The top edge 45 of the front sight blade 22 FIG. 11D and the top edge 50 FIG. 10A of the wheel sight blade 32 FIG. 10A are shown angling downward. This reflects light away from the shooter's eye as shown. Every edge of the sight reticles FIG. 10A, FIG. 10B, FIG. 10C, FIG. 10D, FIG. 11A, FIG. 11C are either angled or coned to reflect light away from the shooter's eye as shown. FIG. 10A, FIG. 10B, FIG. 10C, FIG. 10D, FIG. 11A, FIG. 11C are all a view shown from front to rear of the sight in order that the sight edge angles may be seen. These angled edges are not seen during the sighting process. FIG. 10A, FIG. 11A show holes 48 wherein fiber optic light collecting filaments or luminous paint material can be inserted to enhance low light sighting;

The sighting procedure is: Bring bow to full draw into ready-to-shoot position. Level horizontally the top edge of the front sight 45 FIG. 9A with the top edge 50 FIG. 9A of the square grooved wheel sight blade 32 FIG. 9A. Align vertically the front sight blade 22 FIG. 11D in the square groove of the wheel sight blade 32 FIG. 9A so that there is equal distance 49 FIG. 9A on each side of the front sight blade between both inward edges of the square grooved wheel sight blade. The sight picture will look like the sight picture in FIG. 9A. Then, move this sight picture to the spot you desire the arrow to impact and release arrow.