Title:
Carton for sheet items having a closable integral lid
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The carton has front, rear, side, top and bottom outer panels. At least the top and the front panel are connected together at a transversal edge. A transversally-extending tear strip extends across the front panel and divides between a bottom section and an upper section. The carton includes a lid initially made integral with the front and top panels. The lid is delimited by the tear strip, opposite edges of the front panel located on the upper section thereof and extending from the tear strip to the transversal edge, a transversal fold line extending on the top panel at a given distance from the transversal edge, and a pair of opposite and substantially longitudinal perforation lines made in the top panel and extending between the transversal edge and the fold line. The lid can be opened easily without tools and without any damage to the sheets therein.



Inventors:
Naef, Mike (Montreal, CA)
Application Number:
11/241934
Publication Date:
04/06/2006
Filing Date:
10/04/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
229/239, 229/243, 229/125.19
International Classes:
B65D17/46; B65D43/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BYRD, LATRICE CHENELL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT CANADA LLP (MONTREAL, QC, CA)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A carton for sheet items, the carton having opposite transversally-extending front and rear outer panels, opposite longitudinally-extending side outer panels, and opposite top and bottom outer panels, at least the front and the top panel being integrally connected at a transversal edge, the carton comprising: a transversally-extending tear strip extending across the front panel and dividing the front panel between a bottom section and an upper section; a lid initially made integral with the front and top panels, the lid being delimited by the tear strip, opposite edges of the front panel located on the upper section thereof and extending from the tear strip to the transversal edge, a transversal fold line extending on the top panel at a given distance from the transversal edge, and a pair of opposite and substantially longitudinal perforation lines made in the top panel and extending between the transversal edge and the fold line.

2. The carton as defined in claim 1, wherein the tear strip includes an enlarged pull tab at least at one end thereof.

3. The carton as defined in claim 1, wherein at least one of the perforation lines on the top panel defines an acute angle with a longitudinal edge extending between the top panel and one of the side panels.

4. The carton as defined in claim 1, wherein the front, rear, side, top and bottom panels are part of a one-piece foldable blank.

5. The carton as defined in claim 1, wherein each side panel has an integral front internal flap secured to an interior side of the bottom section of the front panel.

6. The carton as defined in claim 1, wherein the outer panels are made of cardboard or paperboard.

7. The carton as defined in claim 6, wherein the carton is shaped to receive paper blanks for printing.

8. A carton for sheet items, the carton comprising: a bottom tray having a bottom panel, opposite front and rear panels, opposite side panels, the front, rear and side panels having an upper edge defining an open top side; an upper cover having a top panel, opposite front and rear panels, opposite side panels, the front, rear and side panels having a bottom edge defining an open bottom side, the upper cover being sized to snugly fit over the bottom tray and defining an enclosed space therewith; a transversal tear strip extending across the front panel of the upper cover and dividing the front panel between a bottom section and an upper section; a lid initially made integral with the upper cover, the lid being defined on the upper portion between the tear strip, opposite edges located on the upper section of its front panel and extending vertically from the tear strip to a transversal edge joining the front and the top panel thereof, a transversal fold line extending on the top panel at a given distance from the transversal edge, and a pair of opposite and substantially longitudinal perforation lines made in the top panel and extending between the transversal edge and the fold line; and means for securing together the upper cover and the bottom tray when the sheet items are provided in the enclosed space.

9. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein the tear strip includes an enlarged pull tab at least at one end thereof.

10. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein at least one of the perforation lines on the top panel of the upper cover defines an acute angle with a longitudinal edge extending between the top panel and one of the side panels thereof.

11. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein the bottom tray and the upper cover are each part of a folded one-piece blank.

12. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein each side panel of the upper cover has an integral front internal flap secured to an interior side of the bottom section of the front panel.

13. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein the front panel of the bottom tray has a height that is less than that of the side panels of the bottom tray.

14. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein when the bottom tray and the upper cover are secured together, the front panel of the bottom tray has an upper edge that is substantially adjacent to the tear strip of the upper cover when the upper cover and the bottom tray are secured together.

15. The carton as defined in claim 8, wherein the bottom tray and the upper cover are made of cardboard or paperboard.

16. The carton as defined in claim 15, wherein the carton is shaped to receive paper blanks for printing.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO PRIOR APPLICATION

This application claims the benefits of U.S. provisional patent application No. 60/615,577 filed Oct. 5, 2004, the content of which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to a cardboard or paperboard carton for shipping, dispensing and/or storage of sheet items and that is provided with a closable lid made within the carton itself. It is particularly useful for large sheets of paper or cardboard, such as high-end paper blanks used in the printing industry.

Large sheet items are generally shipped in conventional cartons containing a number of these items. Typically, a minimum of sheet items must be purchased from the suppliers, even if the purchasers do not require all of them immediately. To facilitate the manipulation, the purchasers often use the shipping cartons as both: a dispensing box and a storage box until all sheet items are used. The cartons are thus opened at their destination using a box cutter knife or a similar tool capable of removing a portion of the top panel and the front panel. This creates a permanent opening through which one or several of the sheet items can be taken out of the carton whenever required.

Using box cutter knives or similar tools have some drawbacks. First, the knives or tools can damage some of the sheet items, especially those at the top of the stack. Also, the opening created with these tools cannot be readily closed. Dust or other contaminants can accumulate during the storage, particularly when the storage time is relatively long.

SUMMARY

The present invention has been designed in effort to mitigate the above-mentioned problems, especially on aspects such as safety of the content and easiness of opening of the carton.

One aspect of the present invention is to provide a carton for sheet items, the carton having opposite transversally-extending front and rear outer panels, opposite longitudinally-extending side outer panels, and opposite top and bottom outer panels, at least the front and the top panel being integrally connected at a transversal edge, the carton comprising: a transversally-extending tear strip extending across the front panel and dividing the front panel between a bottom section and an upper section; a lid initially made integral with the front and top panels, the lid being delimited by the tear strip, opposite edges of the front panel located on the upper section thereof and extending from the tear strip to the transversal edge, a transversal fold line extending on the top panel at a given distance from the transversal edge, and a pair of opposite and substantially longitudinal perforation lines made in the top panel and extending between the transversal edge and the fold line.

Another aspect of the present invention is to provide a carton for sheet items, the carton comprising: a bottom tray having a bottom panel, opposite front and rear panels, opposite side panels, the front, rear and side panels having an upper edge defining an open top side; an upper cover having a top panel, opposite front and rear panels, opposite side panels, the front, rear and side panels having a bottom edge defining an open bottom side, the upper cover being sized to snugly fit over the bottom tray and defining an enclosed space therewith; a transversal tear strip extending across the front panel of the upper cover and dividing the front panel between a bottom section and an upper section; a lid initially made integral with the upper cover, the lid being defined on the upper portion between the tear strip, opposite edges located on the upper section of its front panel and extending vertically from the tear strip to a transversal edge joining the front and the top panel thereof, a transversal fold line extending on the top panel at a given distance from the transversal edge, and a pair of opposite and substantially longitudinal perforation lines made in the top panel and extending between the transversal edge and the fold line; and means for securing together the upper cover and the bottom tray when the sheet items are provided in the enclosed space.

These and other aspects of the carton will now be described with reference to the appended figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an example of a carton prior, to its opening;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1, showing a tear strip being pulled;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIGS. 1 and 2, showing the lid being opened;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIGS. 1 to 3, showing the lid being partially closed after being opened; and

FIG. 5 is an exploded view showing an example of a carton being made of two separate top and bottom parts.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 shows a dosed carton (10), containing a stack of sheet items, in accordance with an example of a preferred embodiment of the present invention. This carton (10) is dosed from all sides and can be used for shipping, for example between a manufacturer (or a retailer) and a customer. The various outer panels of the carton (10) are maintained in a closed position using conventional fastening methods, such as adhesives, staples or others. More than one fastening method can be used at the same time, if desired. Moreover, the carton (10) can be made from either a one-piece foldable blank or two separate top and bottom one-piece foldable blanks that fit one into the other, once folded, to form a telescopic box.

The carton (10) is shown in FIG. 1 as if it is laid on a flat horizontal surface, which is the typical position for the carton (10) during storage. The carton (10) comprises opposite top and bottom panels (20, 22) extending in a longitudinal and transversal direction of the carton (10). This carton (10) is preferably rectangular, which means that the top and bottom panels (20, 22) have a longitudinal length greater than the transversal length. The carton (10) also comprises two opposite side panels (24, 26) extending in the longitudinal direction, and opposite front and rear panels (28, 30) extending in the transversal direction. In this carton (10), the top panel (20) and the front panel (28) are integrally joined at one common transversal upper edge (32).

FIG. 1 also shows that the front panel (28) comprises a transversally-extending tear strip (40) embedded therein. This tear strip (40) extends from one side of the carton (10) to the other. One of the ends of the tear strip (40), preferably both opposite ends of the tear strip (40), comprises an enlarged pull tab (42) that can be gripped by a user from outside of the carton (10).

The top panel (20) of the carton (10) comprises two opposite and generally longitudinal perforation lines (50) or the like, each extending from a transversal fold line (52) located on the top panel (20) and the ends (54, 56) of the transversal edge (32). Preferably, the perforation lines (50) are slightly convergent towards the rear of the carton (10) so as to define an acute angle with a longitudinal edge extending between the top panel and one of the side panels. This feature prevents the perforation lines (50) of a carton (10) at the bottom of a stack of cartons from being unintentionally severed under the weight of these other cartons. The perforation lines (50) can otherwise be parallel.

FIGS. 2 to 3 illustrate the steps for initially opening a closed carton (10), with sheet items therein, to reveal the lid (60) that is made integral therewith. As shown in FIG. 2, the first step is to remove the tear strip (40) by pulling one of the pull tabs (42). This severs the front panel (28) in two parts. Thereafter, as shown in FIG. 3, the areas in the top panel (20) on each side of perforation lines (50) are separated. This creates the reclosable lid (60) that is made integral with the carton (10). The stack of sheet items (12) is visible in FIG. 3.

The lid (60) of the carton (10) has a top portion (62) attached to the top panel (20) at the transversal fold line (52), and a transversally-extending flap portion (64) attached to the top portion (62) at an end of the lid (60) opposite the transversal fold line (52). The flap portion (64) corresponds to the upper section of the front panel (28). Its vertical outer edges extending between the ends (54, 56) of the transversal edge (32) and the tear strip (40) are either not attached to the adjacent side panels (24, 26) or provided with a detachable arrangement, such as a perforation line or the like.

As can be appreciated, and as shown in FIG. 4, the carton (10) may be dosed by inserting the flap portion (64) behind the front panel (28) when dosing the lid (60). FIG. 4 shows the lid (60) partially closed but as can be understood, the lid (60) can be fully closed and remain in that position because of the friction between the flap portion (64) and the interior of the carton (10).

It should be noted that when initially opening the lid (60) from the remainder of the carton (10), there may be glue and/or a mechanical fastener between the underside of the flap portion (64) and front internal flaps (70) that may be integrally joined to corresponding side panels (24, 26). This glue and/or fastener may be useful for securing the bottom section (28a) of the front panel (28) to the internal flaps (70). The carton (10) can be designed to avoid using glue or fastener between the flap portion (64) and the internal flaps (70) so as to ease the opening by the end users.

FIG. 5 shows that the carton (10) can be in two parts, namely in the form of a bottom tray (100) over which an upper cover (102) snugly fits. This telescopic carton (10) can hold more sheet items than the height of the bottom tray (100) usually permits. The front panel (104) of the bottom tray (100) may be designed to have a height lower than the height of the side panels (106) thereof. This provides a space to retrieve the sheet items more easily, especially in the case where the upper cover (102) is positioned completely over the bottom tray (100). Preferably, the upper edge (108) of the front panel (104) of the bottom tray (100) is designed to be substantially adjacent to the tear strip (40) when the upper cover (102) is positioned over the bottom tray (100). The upper cover (102) and the bottom tray (100) can be secured together using any suitable means, such as a tape, glue, fasteners, etc. FIG. 5 schematically illustrates a piece of tape (110) that can be used as a fastener.