Title:
Siding support apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A siding support apparatus includes a rigid vertical member having an upper end and a lower end. An anchor block is provided for anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to a wall to which siding is to be applied. A plurality of supports are positioned at uniform spaced intervals along the vertical member between the lower end and the upper end.



Inventors:
Shilling, Mark W. (Victoria, CA)
Application Number:
11/220215
Publication Date:
04/06/2006
Filing Date:
09/06/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04G21/26
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Primary Examiner:
BENNETT, GEORGE B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVIS & BUJOLD, P.L.L.C. (CONCORD, NH, US)
Claims:
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A siding support apparatus, comprising: a rigid vertical member having an upper end and a lower end; means for anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to a wall to which siding is to be applied; and a plurality of supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals along the vertical member between the lower end and-the upper end.

2. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the vertical member is approximately six feet in length, so as to be roughly equal to a height of a standard sized wall.

3. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the vertical member is at least two feet in length and has a coupling adapted to receive axial extension members which are also at least two feet in length and have supports positioned at uniform, spaced intervals, thereby facilitating assembly of a vertical member of a desired height.

4. The siding support apparatus as defmed in claim 2, wherein the vertical member is adapted to receive axial extension members which also has supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals, thereby allowing the length of the vertical member to be adjusted to suit walls having a height that exceeds that of a standard sized wall.

5. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the vertical member has a plurality of support attachment positions and each of the supports are detachably secured to the vertical member at one of the support attachment positions, whereby the spacing of the supports is adjustable through selection of support attachment positions having a desired relative spacing.

6. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 5, wherein each of the supports includes a sleeve which is positioned around the vertical member, and means for securing the sleeve to the vertical member at a selected one of the support attachment positions.

7. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 6, wherein at least one aperture is positioned in the vertical member at each of the support attachment positions, and at least one aperture extends through each sleeve of each support, each support being detachably secured to a selected one of the support attachment positions of the vertical member by inserting a fastener through the at least one aperture of the sleeve of the support into the at least one aperture of the support attachment positions of the vertical member.

8. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 7, wherein the sleeve has two spaced apart apertures.

9. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein each support has a movable support member, which is movable between a supporting position and an out-of-the-way position.

10. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 9, wherein the movable support member is pivotally mounted to the support for pivotal movement about a substantially horizontal pivot axis, the supporting position being substantially horizontal and the out-of-the-way position being substantially vertical.

11. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the means for anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to a wall is an anchor block securable to the wall, the anchor block being positioned at the upper end of the vertical member.

12. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 3, wherein the coupling has a rearward facing support bracket for storing at least two planks of siding on edge until needed.

13. A siding support apparatus, comprising: a rigid vertical member having an upper end, a lower end and a plurality of support attachment positions, the vertical member being at least two feet in length; an anchor block positioned at the upper end of the vertical member, the anchor block having integrally formed spikes adapted to facilitate the securing of the anchor block to the wall to which siding is to be applied thereby anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to the wall; and a plurality of supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals along the vertical member between the lower end and the upper end, each of the supports being detachably secured to the vertical member at one of the support attachment positions, whereby the spacing of the supports is adjustable through selection of support attachment positions having a desired relative spacing.

14. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 13, wherein the vertical member has a coupling adapted to receive axial extension members having supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals, thereby allowing the length of the vertical member to be adjusted.

15. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 13, wherein each of the supports includes a sleeve positioned around the vertical member, at least one aperture being positioned in the vertical member at each of the support attachment positions, and at least one aperture extending through each sleeve of each support, each support being detachably secured to a selected one of the support attachment positions of the vertical member by inserting an locking pin through the at least one aperture of the sleeve of the support and into the at least one aperture of the support attachment positions of the vertical member.

16. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 13, wherein each support has a movable support member, which is pivotally mounted to the support for pivotal movement about a substantially horizontal pivot axis, the movable support member having a substantially horizontal supporting position and a substantially vertical out-of-the-way position.

17. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 13, wherein the vertical member is approximately six feet in length, so as to be roughly equal to a height of a standard sized wall.

18. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 14, wherein the coupling has a rearward facing support bracket for storing at least two planks of siding on edge until needed.

19. A siding support apparatus, comprising: a rigid vertical member having an upper end, a lower end and a plurality of support attachment positions, with at least one aperture being positioned in the vertical member at each of the support attachment positions, the vertical member being at least two feet in length, the vertical member having a coupling adapted to receive axial extension members which also having supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals, thereby allowing the length of the vertical member to be adjusted; an anchor block positioned at the upper end of the vertical member, the anchor block having integrally formed spikes adapted to facilitate the securing of the anchor block to the wall to which siding is to be applied, thereby anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to the wall; and a plurality of supports positioned at uniform spaced intervals along the vertical member between the lower end and the upper end, each of the supports being detachably secured to the vertical member at one of the support attachment positions, whereby the spacing of the supports is adjustable through selection of support attachment positions having a desired relative spacing, each of the supports including a sleeve positioned around the vertical member and at least one aperture extending through each sleeve of each support, each support being detachably secured to a selected one of the support attachment positions of the vertical member by inserting an locking pin through the at least one aperture of the sleeve of the support and into the at least one aperture of the support attachment positions of the vertical member, each support having a movable support member, which is pivotally mounted to the support for pivotal movement about a substantially horizontal pivot axis, the movable support member having a substantially horizontal supporting position and a substantially vertical out-of-the-way position.

20. The siding support apparatus as defined in claim 19, wherein the coupling has a rearward facing support bracket for storing at least two planks of siding on edge until needed.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a support apparatus, which is used to support siding during installation on a building.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

There are numerous patents disclosing aids of various types to assist persons installing siding. Some patents disclose installation tools which assist in maintaining consistent spacing between the siding, but do not provide any support. Examples of such apparatus are U.S. Pat. No. 5,465,499 (LaPlante 1995) and U.S. Pat. No. 6,705,021 (Nadal et al 2004). Other patents serve as support apparatus, such as U.S. Pat. No. 4,089,141 (Heroux 1978) and U.S. Pat. No. 4,155,175 (Stiles 1979) and U.S. Pat. No. 4,899,459 (Taggart 1990). A disadvantage with the Heroux and Stiles support apparatus, is that they must be frequently repositioned in the course of covering a wall with siding. In contrast, the Taggart support apparatus is a static support that covers substantially the entire wall, and which need not be repositioned during the course of covering the wall with siding. When installation is complete, it is positioned underneath the siding.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an alternative siding support apparatus, which remains static and reduces the need for repositioning during the course of covering a wall with siding.

According to the present invention there is provided a siding support apparatus, which includes a rigid vertical member having an upper end and a lower end. Means are provided for anchoring the vertical member in parallel spaced relation to a wall to which siding is to be applied. A plurality of supports are positioned at uniform spaced intervals along the vertical member between the lower end and the upper end.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features of the invention will become more apparent from the following description in which reference is made to the appended drawings, the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only and are not intended to in any way limit the scope of the invention to the particular embodiment or embodiments shown, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of the siding support apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is a side perspective view of the siding support apparatus shown in FIG. 1, with an extension attached.

FIG. 3 is a rear elevation view (looking out from a wall) of a pair of the siding support apparatus shown in FIG. 1, supporting siding.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The preferred embodiment, a siding support apparatus generally identified by reference numeral 10, will now be described with reference to FIGS. 1 through 3.

Structure and Relationship of Parts:

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown siding support apparatus 10, including a vertical member 12 having an upper end 14, a lower end 16 and a plurality of support attachment positions 18. It is preferred that vertical member 12 be at least two feet in length. Beneficial results have been obtained through the use of a vertical member which is six feet in length, as that is roughly equal to the height of a standard sized wall. Beneficial results have also been obtained through the use of a vertical member which is three feet in length, as that is a standard height between roof levels with some styles of homes which have a multi-level roof. It is also a useful length for joining vertical members, as will hereinafter further described. An anchor block 20 is positioned at upper end 14 of vertical member 12, anchor block 20 being securable to a wall 22 to which siding 24 is to be applied, thereby anchoring vertical member 12 in spaced relation to wall 22. It is preferred that anchor block 20 have at least one integrally formed spike. This enables anchor block 20 to be driven into position by a person standing at ground level. If anchor block does not have an integral spike, it can have apertures to receive fasteners. This is not as effective, however, as an installer must climb a ladder in order to drive the fasteners into position. Where multiple spikes are used, it has been found easier to position anchor block 20, when one spike is longer than the others. There are a plurality of supports 26 positioned at uniform spaced intervals along vertical member 12 between lower end 16 and upper end 14. Each support 26 is detachably secured to vertical member 12 at one of the support attachment positions 18. The spacing of supports 26 is therefore adjustable through selection of support attachment positions 18 having a desired relative spacing.

For each support 26, the Applicant has chosen to illustrate a sleeve 28 positioned around vertical member 12. Two apertures 30 are positioned in vertical member 12 at each support attachment position 18, and two apertures 32 extend through each sleeve 28 of each support 26. It should be noted that if sleeve 28 is machined to closely fit vertical member 12, that only one aperture is required. Where the machining is less precise, two apertures 30 assists in eliminating movement. It should also be noted that support 26 need not be in the form of a sleeve. It can take other forms. For example, a “U” shaped support that surrounded vertical member on just three sides would be workable. Each support 26 is detachably secured to a selected support attachment position 18 of vertical member 12 by inserting locking pins 34 through the two apertures 32 of sleeve 28 of support 26 and into the two apertures 30 of support attachment positions 18 of vertical member 12. Each support 26 also has a movable support member 36, which is pivotally mounted to support 26 for pivotal movement about a substantially horizontal pivot axis 38. Movable support member 36 has a substantially horizontal supporting position as shown in FIG. 2 and a substantially vertical out-of-the-way position as shown in FIG. 1.

Referring now to FIG. 2, vertical member 12 is shown with a double coupling 39, which consists of two conjoined sleeves 28. Coupling 39 permits vertical member 12 to receive an axial extension member 40. Axial extension member 40 has the same structure as vertical member 12 including supports 26 positioned at uniform spaced intervals and apertures 30, thereby allowing the length of the vertical member to be adjusted. Where vertical member 12 is made six feet long to suit the height of a standard wall, the use of a three foot extension member 40 extends the height to nine feet. Nine feet is another common height of wall. Where vertical member 12 is made three feet long, that addition of a three foot extension member 40, extends the height to six feet, the height of the standard wall. Of course, the same result can be obtained if the vertical member is two feet long and two extension members 40 are added, which are each two feet long.

It is to be noted that coupling 39 has been made with an associate rearward facing bracket 42. As an installer works his way up a wall, the storage of siding becomes an issue. Bracket 42 is intended to hold a number of planks of siding on edge.

Operation:

The operation and use of siding support apparatus 10 will now be discussed with reference to FIGS. 1 through 3. Referring to FIG. 3, two or more of siding support apparatus 10 are positioned in spaced apart relation. Where two side support apparatus 10 are used, each siding support apparatus 10 is supports an opposite end of the siding. For greater spans, it may be desirable to position a third one of siding support 10 in an intermediate position. Referring to FIG. 1, upper end 14 of vertical member 12 is anchored to a wall 22 to which siding 24 is to be applied by anchor block 20. This is done by the installer striking anchor block 20 with a hammer to drive the integral spikes of anchor block 20 into the wall. Supports 26 are positioned at uniform spaced intervals at support attachment positions 18. The spacing intervals depend upon the width dimension of the siding being applied. Supports 26 are attached to vertical member 12 by inserting locking pins 34 through apertures 32 in sleeve 28 and through corresponding apertures 30 in vertical member 12. As siding 24 is applied to wall 22, siding 24 is supported upon movable support members 36 of supports 26. When not yet required to support siding 24, movable support members 36 may be pivoted out of the way about pivot axis 38, so that movement of siding 24 either up or down past supports 26 remains unimpeded. It is envisaged that the installer will want to make vertical member 12 each to the height of the wall he is working on. A three foot height, a six foot height or nine foot height are standard heights. There may, of course, be walls that are other than standard heights. Referring to FIG. 2, regardless of the height of the wall, vertical member 12 may extended using axial extension member 40. Axial extension member 40 is shown to be attached to the lower end 16 of vertical member 12. This is preferable so that anchor block 20 is always at the top to provide more stability. Axial extension member 40 is inserted into double coupling 39 and secured in position by inserting locking pins 34 through apertures 32 in sleeve 28 and through apertures 30. Extra planks of siding can be stored in bracket 42. Referring to FIG. 3, a problem with prior art siding supports is that they continually had to be moved as the installer progressed up the wall. Many prior art siding supports could only support two planks at a time. FIG. 3, shown from the wall side, demonstrates how siding support 10 can be installed and left in position while the installer works his way up the wall. Siding 24 is shown narrower than reality, in order that the viewer will appreciate the relative positioning of siding supports 10.

Advantages:

With siding support 10, as described, sleeves 28 can be rapidly adjusted to the spacing required to suit a particular width of siding. The length of vertical members 12 can be adjusted to suit short or tall walls, with extension members 40 being added, as required. Vertical members 12 are rapidly placed in position by striking anchor blocks 20 to drive the integral spikes of anchor blocks 20 into wall 22. Once in position, siding supports 10 can carry the weight of siding planks 24, even Hardy Plank style concrete siding, allowing the installer free use of his hands to caulk and nail. Movable support members 36 are be pivoted out of the way until required, and then pivoted down into the substantially horizontal supporting position. It will be appreciated that siding supports 10 could also be used to install wall shingles, by placing a straight edge support straddling two of siding supports 10. Bracket 42 conveniently store several siding planks, so that the installer does not have to climb up and down from scaffolding as often, and does not have to create a potential safety hazard by placing several siding planks on the scaffolding with him.

Cautionary Warnings:

When movable support members 36 are be pivoted down into the substantially horizontal supporting position, it is preferred that a ⅝ of an inch space be maintained between the remote edge of movable support members 36 and wall 22.

Issues surrounding terminology:

Locking “pins” 34 can take a number of forms. Beneficial results have been obtained using pins that have apertures to receive cotter pins. Beneficial results have also been obtained by using threaded fasteners with wing-nut style nuts. It is not intended that the term “pins” be given a restrictive definition. The locking pins need only be cable of extending through the apertures to prevent movements of sleeves 28.

In this patent document, the word “comprising” is used in its non-limiting sense to mean that items following the word are included, but items not specifically mentioned are not excluded. A reference to an element by the indefinite article “a” does not exclude the possibility that more than one of the element is present, unless the context clearly requires that there be one and only one of the elements.

It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that modifications may be made to the illustrated embodiment without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter defined in the Claims.





 
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