Title:
Device to count strikes
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A device to count strikes, to be attached to one object that strikes another, such as a boxing glove, or to an object that is being stricken, such as a punching bag. The device comprises a structure for mounting the device to a striking object or an object being stricken. The device further comprises an inertia sensitive switch, a circuit connected to the inertia sensitive switch, a reset switch connected to the circuit, and a display which is controlled by the circuit. The inertia sensitive switch closes in response to a predetermined amount of inertial force created by movement indicating a strike. The circuit generates a signal to the display indicative of this count whereby the number of strikes is known.



Inventors:
Wiblin, Brian David (Richardson, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/246042
Publication Date:
03/30/2006
Filing Date:
09/27/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/00
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Primary Examiner:
RICHMAN, GLENN E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Brian Wiblin (Dallas, TX, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. Strike counting device comprising: (a) an inertia responsive switch adapted to close in response to a predetermined magnitude of inertial force resulting from the user moving the device with movement indicating a strike (b) processing means connected to an output of said inertia responsive switch, for determining based on the output from said inertia responsive switch whether said strike has occurred and having means for counting occurrences of said strike; and (c) display means controlled by the processing means to display results from said means for counting, said results being indicative of the number of times the strike has occurred; wherein said inertia responsive switch closes in response to inertia forces greater than a predetermined magnitude, and wherein the switch outputs a pulse when closing.

2. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a means to fasten the device to the striking object.

3. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a means to fasten the device to a boxing glove.

4. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a means to fasten the device to the user's leg.

5. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a means to fasten the device to the object being stricken.

6. Strike counting device of claim 4 wherein said means to fasten the device is adapted for a punching bag.

7. Strike counting device of claim 4 wherein said means to fasten the device is adapted for a human.

8. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a means to fasten the device to both an object being stricken and the striking object.

9. Strike counting device of claim 1 wherein said means to fasten the device is adapted for both a human limb and a punching bag.

10. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a housing adapted to be attached to an object being stricken and the striking object.

11. Strike counting device of claim 10 wherein said housing is adapted to be attached to both a human limb and a punching bag.

12. Strike counting device of claim 1 further comprising a plurality of inertia sensitive switches oriented in different directions whereby the switch closes based on a strike in different directions.

13. Housing adapted to be attached to a striking object; and a switch disposed within the housing adapted to close in response to a predetermined level of inertial force in response to a user moving the device with movement indicating a strike.

14. System of claim 14 further comprising a display.

15. System of claim 15 further comprising a circuit.

15. System of claim 16 further comprising a strap.

17. Housing adapted to be attached to an object being stricken; and a switch disposed within the housing adapted to close in response to a predetermined level of inertial force in response to a user moving the device with movement indicating a strike.

18. System of claim 14 further comprising a display.

19. System of claim 15 further comprising a circuit.

20. System of claim 16 further comprising a strap.

Description:

CROSS-REFRENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application is entitled to the benefit of Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. US60/613,939 filed 2004 Sep. 28.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to training equipment for athletes. Specifically, this invention relates to equipment used by boxers, practitioners of the martial arts, and other athletes involved with sports that involve striking.

2. Description of Prior Art

Training devices designed to be used by an athlete while striking such as with their hands or feet are well known in the prior art. A few previous art devices measure characteristics of a strike but these devices do not count the strikes thrown and cannot be attached to either the striking object or the object receiving the strike.

One device that provides information about a strike is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,763,284, issued Aug. 9, 1988 to Carlin, entitled REACTION TIME AND FORCE FEEDBACK SYSTEM. The system described in this patent provides information about the magnitude of force of the strike but the system does not count strikes thrown and can only be attached to the limb of the user. Another device is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,941,660 issued Jul. 17, 1990 to Winn, et al., entitled IMPACT AND SPEED MEASURING SYSTEM, which measures a peak and total applied force on a target. However, this device does not count strikes thrown and must receive a strike and cannot be attached to the striking object. Also, U.S. Pat. No. 4,883,271 Issued Nov. 28, 1989 to French, entitled SPORTS IMPACT MEASURING APPARATUS measures characteristics of an impact but does not count the impacts. This apparatus is also not able to be fastened to both striking objects and objects being stricken.

Therefore, no device exists to indicate the number of strikes thrown by a user. Therefore, there is also no device for counting strikes that is designed to be fastened to either the striking object, such as a boxing glove, or the object being stricken, such as a punching bag. Thus, there exists a need for athletic training apparatus that counts strikes and that can be fastened to the striking object or the object being stricken.

Objects and Advantages

It is an object of the present invention to provide a strike counting device that provides an indication of the number of strikes thrown. It is further an object of the invention to provide this function in a device that can be attached to either the striking object such as the user's boxing glove or the object being stricken such as a punching bag. It is another object of this invention to provide such a strike counting device which can be compact and can be produced relatively inexpensively. Physical fitness is a primary concern for those participating in boxing, martial arts, and other sports that involve striking such as punching or kicking. The strike counting device helps the user improve their physical fitness by providing information which can be used to improve their exercise routine and to motivate them during exercise. Information provided includes a gauge of the user's endurance. Specifically, the device shows how many strikes the user can throw before they become too tired to continue throwing strikes. The strike counting device also provides a gauge of the user's striking ability by showing how many strikes they can throw in a predetermined amount of time such as one minute or one boxing round. The strike counting device also shows the user how much time is required to throw a predetermined number of strikes, another gauge of striking ability and physical fitness.

Ambidexterity gives a boxer or martial artist an advantage in a fight. Another benefit of the strike counting device is that it helps the user improve their ambidexterity. This is done by attaching a strike counting to each arm and/or leg of the user. The user can know which limb they use the most often and make changes to which limbs they use accordingly.

Another advantage of the strike counting device is that it can be attached to either the striking object, such as a boxing glove, or the object being stricken, such as a punching bag. This design allows the user to use the strike counting device in the manner that best suits them and therefore provide the most benefit. For example, one user may find it more convenient to leave the device attached to a punching bag where they never have to move it. Another user may prefer to wear the device attached to their boxing glove, where they can use it with any punching bag. A user may also prefer to wear the strike counting device on more than one limb, such as both boxing gloves and both ankles, at the same time, so they can simultaneously track how often they strike with each limb.

SUMMARY

Thus, a main object of the present invention is to count strikes, e.g., the number of punches or kicks.

DRAWINGS

Drawing Figures

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a strike counting device embodying this invention;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are respectively a top view and a bottom view of the strike counting device of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 3A and 3B show arrangements of inertia sensitive switches inside the case of the strike counting device;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram for showing the inner structure of the strike counting device of FIG. 3A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIGS. 1, 2A and 2B show a strike counting device embodying this invention, having a case 1 of a solid form. A display screen 2 comprising an LCD is provided on the top surface of the case 1. A strike count reset button 3 is also provided on the top surface of the case 1. On the bottom surface of the case is a battery cover 4. On battery cover 4 is a dip 5 for fastening the strike counting device to another object.

FIGS. 3A and 3B show how inertia sensitive switches may be arranged inside the case 1. Each of the switches (say, one indicated by numeral 11) is composed of a pendulum 11a, adapted to oscillate around a support point (fulcrum) and provided with a weight 11b at its free end, and a lead switch 11c which is disposed near the swinging path of the pendulum 120a and is switched on when the weight 11b touches it. The range of the swinging motion of the pendulum 11a is limited by a biasing means such as a spring (not shown) and is provided such that the pendulum 11a will return to a specified normal position. If the pendulum 11a swings due to inertia indicating a strike, it is detected by a voltage or current caused by the opening and closing of the lead switch 11c as a result of being contacted by the weight 11b. It is to be noted that the type of inertia sensitive switches to be included is not intended to limit the scope of this invention.

FIG. 3A shows an example wherein one inertia sensitive switch 11 is disposed in one direction but two or more switches may be arranged as shown in FIG. 3B. In the example shown in FIG. 3B, two inertia sensitive switches 111 and 112 are disposed in mutually perpendicular X and Y directions, a third inertia sensitive switch 113 is disposed in a Z direction perpendicular to the XY plane in which the first two switches 111 and 112 are placed. It is to be noted that the number of inertia sensitive switches to be included is not intended to limit the scope of this invention.

FIG. 4 shows that the inertia sensitive switch 11 shown in FIG. 3A is connected to the circuit 12 and sends signals to the circuit 12. The reset switch is also connected to the circuit 12 and sends signals to the circuit 12. The display 2 is also connected to and receives signals from the circuit 12.

In a second embodiment, the clip 5 is fastened to a strap which is wrapped around the object being stricken or the striking object. For example, the strap is wrapped around a punching bag and the strike counting device fastened to the strap using the clip 5.

Operation

The manner of using the strike counting device is to use the clip 5 to fasten the strike counting device to one of the objects participating in the strike: the striking object such as their boxing glove or the object being stricken such as a punching bag. The strike counting device may be clipped directly to the object or clipped to a strap that is wrapped around the object. The user presses the reset button to set the strike count to zero. The user then strikes and the strike counting device then shows on the display the number of strikes thrown. If the user has fastened the device to a boxing glove, striking in the air (i.e. shadowboxing) will be sufficient to increment the counter.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that the strike counting device is useful in assisting the user to improve their physical fitness and train for boxing, martial arts, and other sports that involve striking. The strike counting device helps the user improve their physical fitness and striking ability by showing them the number of strikes thrown, which as stated above allows the user to gauge their endurance, strike rate, and ambidexterity.

While the systems and methods of the present invention have proven to be particularly useful in the area of boxing and martial arts, those skilled in the art can appreciate that the systems and methods can be used in a variety of different applications, such as in the areas of cardio-kickboxing, fitness workouts, and other such areas. These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be set forth or will become more fully apparent in the description that follows and in the appended claims. The features and advantages may be realized and obtained by means of the instruments and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims. Furthermore, the features and advantages of the invention may be learned by the practice of the invention or will be obvious from the description, as set forth hereinafter.

The invention has been described in detail, with particular emphasis on the preferred embodiments, but it should be understood that variations and modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention may occur to those skilled in the art to which the invention pertains.