Title:
Dust mop having dust-collecting protrusions
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A dust mop having a base, debris-collecting protrusions, and one or more attachment members is provided. The base has a top surface and a bottom surface. The debris-collecting protrusions are defined on the bottom surface. Each of the protrusions defines a planar section facing a cleaning direction. The attachment members removably secure a cleaning sheet over the bottom surface.



Inventors:
Lacotta, Paul (Tenafly, NJ, US)
Fiebel, William (West Orange, NJ, US)
Moldauer, John (East Meadow, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/215873
Publication Date:
03/09/2006
Filing Date:
08/31/2005
Assignee:
UNGER MARKETING INTERNATIONAL, LLC.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/231
International Classes:
A47L13/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
DANIEL, JAMAL D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
George W. Rauchfuss, Esq. (Stamford, CT, US)
Claims:
1. A dust mop comprising: a base having a top surface and a bottom surface; a plurality of debris-collecting protrusions defined on said bottom surface, each of said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions defining a planar section facing a cleaning direction; and one or more attachment members for removably securing a cleaning sheet over said bottom surface.

2. The dust mop as in claim 1, further comprising an extension pole moveably secured to said top surface by a hinge member.

3. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein said base is generally rectangular.

4. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein the mop cleaning sheet is useable as a wet mopping application and/or a dry mopping application.

5. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are generally disposed lengthwise along a major axis of said bottom surface.

6. The dust mop as in claim 5, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions have a generally wavy or undulating appearance along said major axis.

7. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions repeat in a staggered pattern along a minor axis of said bottom surface.

8. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions comprise two protrusions, said two protrusions being diagonal with respect to a major axis of said bottom surface so that so that a generally v-shaped debris collection area is defined.

9. The dust mop as in claim 8, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are linear or curvilinear.

10. The dust mop as in claim 1, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions comprise a plurality of support regions along a leading edge of said base.

11. A dust mop comprising: a base having a minor axis and a major axis; a plurality of debris-collecting protrusions defined on said base; and one or more attachment members for removably securing a cleaning sheet over said base, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are sufficient to foul to about ninety percent of the cleaning sheet along said minor axis during use of the dust mop.

12. The dust mop as in claim 11, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are sufficient to foul up to about eighty percent of the cleaning sheet along said minor axis during use of the dust mop.

13. The dust mop as in claim 11, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are sufficient to foul between about forty percent to about sixty percent of the cleaning sheet along said minor axis during use of the dust mop.

14. The dust mop as in claim 11, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are generally disposed lengthwise along said major axis.

15. The dust mop as in claim 14, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions have a generally wavy or undulating appearance along said major axis.

16. The dust mop as in claim 11, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions repeat in a staggered pattern along said minor axis.

17. The dust mop as in claim 11, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions comprise two protrusions, said two protrusions being diagonal with respect to said major axis so that so that a generally v-shaped debris collection area is defined.

18. The dust mop as in claim 17, wherein said plurality of debris-collecting protrusions are linear or curvilinear.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/606,234, filed on Sep. 1, 2004 the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present disclosure relates to wet or dry dust mops. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a dust mop having dust-collecting protrusions.

2. Description of Related Art

Mops that utilize a disposable cleaning sheet or pad, such as a woven or non-woven sheet, for cleaning are known in the art and are often referred to as “dust mops”. Many dust mops removably secure the cleaning sheet to a generally planar mop head. The mop head is pivotally secured to an extension pole, allowing the user to move the cleaning sheet over a flat surface using a traditional mopping action. Such a dust mop is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,225,998 to Theilen.

The ability of the dust mop to pick up and retain dirt and debris (hereinafter “debris”) can be an important aspect to consumer acceptance of the mop. This is particularly true in dust mops using disposable cleaning sheets, where the cost of use is directly proportional to the percent of the cleaning sheet utilized by the mop.

Unfortunately, prior solutions have not improved the mop efficiency to desired levels. Thus, there is a continuing need for more efficient dust mops.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present disclosure to provide a dust mop having debris-collecting protrusions.

It is another object of the present disclosure to provide a dust mop having a plurality of protrusions, which prevent torque applied to the leading edge during movement of the mop from causing the leading edge to push debris in front of the mop.

A dust mop having a base, debris-collecting protrusions, and one or more attachment members is provided. The base has a top surface and a bottom surface. The debris-collecting protrusions are defined on the bottom surface. Each of the protrusions defines a planar section facing a cleaning direction. The attachment members removably secure a cleaning sheet over the bottom surface.

A dust mop having a base, debris-collecting protrusions defined on the base, and one or more attachment members one or more attachment members for removably securing a cleaning sheet over the base is provided. The base has a minor axis and a major axis. The debris-collecting protrusions are sufficient to foul up to about ninety percent of the cleaning sheet along the minor axis during use of the dust mop.

The above-described and other features and advantages of the present disclosure will be appreciated and understood by those skilled in the art from the following detailed description, drawings, and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a prior art dust mop;

FIG. 2 is a bottom view of a cleaning sheet after use with the dust mop of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an exemplary embodiment of a dust mop according to the present disclosure;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a bottom surface of the dust mop of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the dust mop of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of a cleaning sheet after use with the dust mop of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of an alternate exemplary embodiment of a dust mop of according to the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to the drawings and in particular to FIG. 1, a prior dust mop 10 is illustrated. Mop 10 includes a base 12, an extension pole 14, and a cleaning sheet 16. Base 12 can be a generally rectangular member having a top surface 18, a planar bottom surface 20, a major axis 22, and a minor axis 24.

Extension pole 14 can be moveably secured to top surface 18 by a hinge member 26. Additionally, cleaning sheet 16 can be removably secured over bottom surface 20. For example, base 12 can include one or more attachment members 30 for removably securing cleaning sheet 16.

Mop 10 finds use in both wet and dry mopping applications. In many mopping applications, cleaning sheet 16 can be a disposable sheet such as those commercially available from Proctor and Gamble under the “Swiffer” trade name. Alternately, cleaning sheet 16 can be a re-useable sheet.

In use, bottom surface 20 is pushed over an area in a cleaning direction 28 in response to forces applied to pole 14. Generally, cleaning direction 28 is substantially perpendicular to major axis 22 (e.g., parallel to minor axis 24). In this manner, mop 10 is useful to collect debris on cleaning sheet 16. Once cleaning sheet 16 is full of debris, the sheet can be removed from base 12 via attachment members 30 and replaced with a clean sheet.

It should be recognized that bottom surface 20 can also be pulled over the area in a direction opposite to cleaning direction 28, can be moved side-to-side over the area in a direction perpendicular the cleaning direction, or any combination thereof. However, mop 10 is described in use only along cleaning direction 28 for purposes of clarity.

It has been determined by the present invention that the planar bottom surface 20 of mop results in under utilization of cleaning sheet 16 in use. The utilization of cleaning sheet 16 is described with reference to FIG. 2. When moved in cleaning direction 28, it has been determined that the leading edge 32 of sheet 16 becomes fully saturated with or full of debris 34 (“fouled”). Once leading edge 32 is fouled with debris 34, mop 10 can no longer be effectively used for cleaning until sheet 16 has been replaced with a clean sheet. Unfortunately, planar bottom surface 20 results in only about twenty percent of sheet 16 being utilized. Specifically, it has been determined that sheet 16 is utilized along only about twenty percent of minor axis 24.

While not wishing to be bound by any one particular theory, it is believed that that pressure applied to pole 14 during movement of base 12 in cleaning direction 28 causes a torque 36 about the base along axis 38. It is believed that torque 36 increases the downward pressure of leading edge 32 on the cleaning area. Namely, leading edge 32 has a higher pressure on the cleaning area as compared to the opposite trailing or following edge of the base. This increased pressure on leading edge 32 is believed to impart a plow-like effect to any debris 34 on the surface to be cleaned, where the leading edge merely pushes the debris in front of the base instead of allowing the debris to travel under the base.

An exemplary embodiment of a dust mop 110 according to the present disclosure is described with simultaneous reference to FIGS. 3 through 5 in which component parts performing similar and/or analogous functions are numbered in multiples of one hundred.

Mop 110 includes a base 112, an extension pole 114, and a cleaning sheet (not shown for purposes of clarity). Base 112 can be a generally rectangular member having a top surface 118, a bottom surface 120, a major axis 122, and a minor axis 124.

Extension pole 114 is moveably secured to top surface 118 by a hinge member 126. For example, hinge member 126 can be a dual axis hinge as described in commonly owned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/896,246, filed on Jul. 21, 2004, the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein.

Additionally, base 112 can include one or more attachment members 130 for removably securing a cleaning sheet over bottom surface 120. Mop 110 can be used in both wet and dry mopping applications.

In use, bottom surface 120 is pushed over an area to be cleaned in a cleaning direction 128 in response to forces applied to pole 114. Generally, cleaning direction 128 is substantially perpendicular to major axis 122 (e.g., parallel to minor axis 124). In this manner, mop 110 is useful to collect debris on the cleaning sheet.

Advantageously, bottom surface 120 includes a plurality of debris-collecting protrusions 140 each defining a planar section 142. Debris-collecting protrusions 140 are generally disposed lengthwise along major axis 122. In the illustrated embodiment, protrusions 140 have a generally wavy or undulating appearance along major axis 122. Protrusions 140 are defined on bottom surface in a pattern much like a roofing tile pattern, namely the protrusions repeat in a staggered pattern in the along minor axis 124.

In one exemplary embodiment, planar sections 142 face cleaning direction 128 to assist in collecting debris when moving base 112 in the cleaning direction. In another exemplary embodiment, protrusions 140 define one or more planar sections 142 facing cleaning direction 128 and one or more planar sections 142 facing opposite to the cleaning direction. In this manner, base 112 assists in collecting debris when moving base 112 in cleaning direction 128 as well as when moving opposite to the cleaning direction.

Additionally, protrusions 140 provide support to base 112 during movement in cleaning direction 128. For example, protrusions 140 can include a plurality of support regions 144 along the leading edge 132 of base 112. Support regions 144 can mitigate increases in downward pressure on leading edge 132 due to forces applied to pole 114. Thus, support regions 144 can ensure that pressure is applied evenly across base 112, which prevents the plow-like effect to debris on the surface to be cleaned as occurs with prior devices.

It has been found that protrusions 140 increase the utilization of the cleaning sheet when in use with mop 110. The utilization of a cleaning sheet 116 in use with base 112 is described with reference to FIG. 6. Here, sheet 116 is shown after use with base 112 having only planar sections 142 facing cleaning direction 128. Sheet 116 is shown being fouled with debris 134 in front of the protrusions (i.e., in the cleaning direction 128). Specifically, sheet 116 becomes fouled in front of each planar section 142. Advantageously, protrusions 140 result in utilization of sheet 116 of up to about ninety percent of sheet 116 along minor axis 24, more preferably up to about eighty percent, with between about forty percent to about sixty percent being most preferred.

While not wishing to be bound by any one particular theory, it is believed that that pressure applied to pole 114 during movement of base 112 in cleaning direction 128 causes a torque 136 about the base along an axis (not shown) parallel to major axis 122. It is believed that torque 136 increases the downward pressure of planar edges 142 on the cleaning area. In prior devices such as mop 10 described above, torque 36 is localized at leading edge 32, which is believed to impart a plow-like effect to any debris 34 on the surface to be cleaned, where the leading edge merely pushes the debris in front of the base instead of allowing the debris to travel under the base. Advantageously, it is believed that protrusions 140 replicate the leading edge of prior mops several times along bottom 120. It is believed that spreading torque 136 among protrusions 140, instead of being centralized at the leading edge 32 of prior devices, allows debris to travel under base 120 and, thus, to be captured by planar surfaces 142.

Referring now to FIG. 7, a bottom view of an alternate exemplary embodiment of a base 212 for a dust mop is shown, where component parts performing similar and/or analogous functions are numbered in multiples of one hundred. Base 212 can be a generally rectangular member having a bottom surface 220, a major axis 222, a minor axis 224, and at least one debris-collecting protrusion 240 defined on the bottom surface.

Debris-collecting protrusions 240 are generally disposed diagonally with respect to major axis 222 so that a generally v-shaped debris collection area is defined. In the illustrated embodiment, protrusions 240 have a generally linear appearance. Of course, it is contemplated by the present disclosure for protrusions 240 have a curved or curvilinear appearance

Protrusions 240 preferably define one or more planar sections 242 facing cleaning direction 228 and one or more planar sections 242 facing opposite to the cleaning direction. Here, protrusions 240 define four generally v-shaped debris collection areas, namely one in the cleaning direction, one opposite the cleaning direction, and two perpendicular to the cleaning direction.

Additionally, protrusions 240 provide support to base 212 during movement in cleaning direction 228. For example, protrusions 240 can include a plurality of support regions 244 along the leading edge 232 of base 212. Support regions 244 can mitigate increases in downward pressure on leading edge 232 due to the torque forces imparted to base 212 during movement in cleaning direction 228.

It should also be noted that the terms “first”, “second”, “third”, “upper”, “lower”, and the like may be used herein to modify various elements. These modifiers do not imply a spatial, sequential, or hierarchical order to the modified elements unless specifically stated.

While the present disclosure has been described with reference to one or more exemplary embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the present disclosure. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the disclosure without departing from the scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the present disclosure not be limited to the particular embodiment(s) disclosed as the best mode contemplated, but that the disclosure will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.