Title:
Storage and uncontaminated dispensing of fluids
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An improved container for storing, dispensing and handling viscous and semi-viscous fluids such as paint and the like, having a fluid storage bag within the container and other design features that enable substantially uncontaminated dispensing of fluid and improved handling and storage.



Inventors:
Lavin, Ralph (Salem, NH, US)
Kersey, George E. (Framingham, MA, US)
Application Number:
10/902112
Publication Date:
02/02/2006
Filing Date:
07/30/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D35/56
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
NGO, LIEN M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
George E. Kersey (Framingham, MA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A fluid storage and dispensing product comprising: (a.) a body defining an interior volume and having a closable lid; and (b) a bag for containing said fluid disposed within said body.

2. A product as defined in claim 1 wherein said fluid is paint.

3. A product as defined in claim 1 wherein said body is of a synthetic material.

4. A product as defined in claim 1 wherein said body is of a metallic material.

5. A product as defined in claim 1 wherein said bag is re-sealable.

6. A product as defined in claim 1 wherein said body contains a plurality of bags for containing said fluid.

7. A product as defined in claim 6 wherein said bags are of different sizes for holding different volumes of said fluid.

8. A product as defined in claim 4 wherein said body is cylindrical.

9. A product as defined in claim 9 wherein said lid is threadable on said body.

10. A product as defined in claim 9 wherein said lid is engageable with said body by a force fit.

11. A method for storing fluids comprising the steps of: (a.) providing a body defining an interior volume; and (b) disposing a bag for containing said fluid within said body.

12. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the step of storing paint in said bag.

13. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the step of providing said body from a synthetic material.

14. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the step of providing said body from a metallic material.

15. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the step sealing said bag.

16. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the step providing, in said body, a plurality of bags for containing said fluid.

17. The method as defined in claim 16 further including the step of providing said bags of different sizes for holding different volumes of said fluid.

18. The method as defined in claim 15 further including the step of unsealing said bag to provide access to the fluid therein.

19. The method as defined in claim 18 further including the step of resealing said bag after a prescribed amount of fluid has been poured therefrom.

20. The method as defined in claim 11 further including the steps of (a.) providing a body defining an interior volume; and (b) disposing a plurality of different sized bags for containing said fluid within said body. (c) storing paint in at least one of said bags. (d) removing a bag storing paint from said body; (e) pouring a measured amount of paint from said bag storing paint into another of said bags; (f) sealing said bag storing paint, after a measured amount has been poured therefrom; and (g) retuning the sealed bag to said body.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to containers for viscous and other fluids and to improvements in the containment, dispensing and handling of such fluids; and, more particularly to architectural coatings such as paints and the like and to significant improvements in the can storage and dispensing of paint without contamination.

Most one-gallon and smaller containers of paint are cylindrical metal cans having an upper edge with a groove that receives the annular protrusion of a metal lid secured to the can by a press fit. This arrangement has many disadvantages. There is no locking mechanism to prevent the frictionally held lid from popping off if the can is accidentally dropped, with consequent spilling of the contents. The lid, moreover, must be pried off with a tool to gain access to the paint, and no tool may be readily available. The prying action often damages the lid sealing surface. The can lip also makes a poor spout. When the contents are to be transferred to another container, they must be poured across the grooved upper edge of the can. The groove invariably retains some of the paint, causing a problem when the lid is replaced, and paint can run down the outside of the can, and must be wiped to prevent paint from reach the can support surface.

In addition, because the inside of the upper rim traps paint as it is poured, all available paint cannot be extracted, even if a brush is used. The circular shape of the can opening, also is unsuitable for wiping a flat brush clean of excess paint. Every time paint is poured from a can, the groove that accepts the lid fills with paint and it is very difficult to clean completely. After repeated openings, pourings, and closings, the mating surfaces become fouled and the friction seal can fail.

Another objection to the conventional paint can is the splattering of paint from the groove as the lid is pounded back on. The pounding also often damages both sealing surfaces, which can cause the seal to fail. Paint in and around the groove can dry out and flake, leading to paint contamination each time the can is jostled. While metal cans are coated to prevent rust, this coating often fails, which leads to rust and paint contamination. Paint cans, in addition, do not stack well, and little disturbance is needed to cause them to slide off of one another.

Many efforts have been made to address these and other problems associated with the conventional paint cans. Some prior improvements remedy to some degree some of the shortcomings mentioned above, but none, until the present invention, has effectively solved even a majority of these problems.

As an example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,669,526 discloses a plastic paint can that has a small-diameter, collapsible spout, non-contaminating lid seal, and straight edge formed in the can opening to facilitate brush wiping. This configuration, however, only addresses problems of paint contamination, messy pouring, and non-uniform brush wiping inherent in the conventional metal paint can. The narrow spout opening causes a slow pour rate and an undesirable chugging action as contents are poured.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,269,438 discloses a container with features designed to improve dispensing, such as a pivotally mounted carrying handle that is offset from the opening to provide access. It also has a wide pouring channel to improve flow, addressing to some degree a number of deficiencies. The pop top of the lid, however, is not very secure and the spout does not prevent paint running down the side of the container.

A plastic container having a threaded lid that closes the container either by screw-down or snap-on action is proposed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,453,647. A depression is formed in the lid to accept a mixing stick or the like to aid in tightening and undoing the lid. This configuration, however, only addresses the problems of paint contamination and the difficult opening and closing of the lid inherent in the conventional metal paint can. As the contents are poured, they can still coat container threads and run down the side of the container. A tool, in particular a paint mixing stick, not always available, is required, moreover, to open the lid.

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,917,268, there is disclosed a liquid-dispersing package with a spout that has a drain back channel to return liquid drips to the container. This configuration, however, only addresses the problem of difficult, messy pouring inherent in containers intended for dispensing low viscosity liquids, but it does not work will with moderate viscosity fluids, such as paint. The tall and narrow design, moreover, eliminates the stackability of the container.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,054,661, as another illustration of attempts to improve the pouring operation, discloses a pouring spout that extends outwardly of the upper edge of the container, and an opposing handle projected from the upper edge of the container. It is also primarily intended to facilitate dispensing of paint during painting. In this invention, however, there is also no means to store the paint, and any unintended spillage during pouring will also wet exterior surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,619,373 discloses a plastic paint container with a lid that seals within the inner diameter of the rim at the top of the container, to eliminate the poor sealing characteristics of the friction lid of the metal paint can. It is still subject, however, to contamination of the seal by the paint itself, and does not provide for clean use or dispensing.

Another proposal, in U.S. Pat. No. 4,245,753 also provides a plastic paint container, but with a snap-on, screw-off type of lid. It also provides a stacking construction and a hollow handle. The design addresses the sealing and opening/closing problem with the metal paint can friction lid, and aids in stacking containers together. Like the other prior art, however, it does not provide for clean dispensing or use, nor does it address the difficulty that would be encountered with hand rotation of a firmly engaged, large diameter friction seal lid.

Still another disclosure in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,530,500 and 6,634,525 provides a plastic paint storage and dispensing can with a top collar joined to a bottom portion. A pouring guide in the collar includes a pour spout extending upwardly above the collar for pouring paint over the collar. A cap engages the collar to close the bottom and has an interior height that is sufficient to accommodate the pour spout when the cap is engaged with the collar. This arrangement significantly departs from the simplicity of the metal can and has the objection of requiring a complex plastic can. Moreover there is no provision for keeping the opened plastic can from becoming contaminated by dust and other debris after the can has been opened and re-used a number of times. Nor is there any way to prevent the contents from accidental spillage.

Numerous other prior art proposals provide for attaching auxiliary components to existing metal cans. Attachments are inherently deficient because they all require the additional operations of the attachment, removal, and cleaning which are inconvenient to the user. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,702,395 discloses a handle and pouring-spout arrangement intended for attachment to a conventional metal paint can. The spout has an optional paint-drain back section. This configuration, moreover, only attempts to solve the problem of difficult, messy pouring from conventional metal paint cans.

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,949,884, as another illustration, a removable top to a conventional metal can is proposed to attempt to solve these problems of difficult, messy pouring from conventional paint cans. Again, it must be attached and removed not only for every opening and closing, respectively, but also every time a brush is to be used.

While the above-mentioned advances in the art each solve to some degree some of the major problems inherent in the conventional metal paint can, none of them solves a majority of the problems. Some, moreover, improve only a subset of the problems and make improvements at the expense of some current favorable can features. The present invention, on the other hand, synergistically solves nearly all of the major problems above-enumerated inherent in the conventional metal and plastic paint cans.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A primary object of the invention, accordingly, is to provide a new and improved paint container for obviating the other previously described handling and operational disadvantages of current paint can containers.

Other and further objects will be explained hereinafter and are more particularly delineated in the appended claims.

In accordance with the invention, a fluid storage and dispensing product is provided by (a.) a body defining an interior volume and having a closable lid; and (b) a bag for containing the fluid disposed within the body.

The fluid can be paint and the body fabricated from a synthetic material, such as plastic, or a metallic material, such as tin plate. The bag contained within the body is sealable, openable and re-seable.

In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the body can contain a plurality of bags, of different for holding different volumes of said fluid.

The body can assume a wide variety of shapes, including cylindrical and quadrilateral. A lid for the body can be threadable on the body or engageable in another way including a force fit.

In a method of the invention for storing fluids the steps include (a.) providing a body defining an interior volume; and (b) disposing a bag for containing fluid within the body.

The method also includes the steps of storing paint in the bag, providing the body from a synthetic or metallic material, sealing the bag, providing, in the body, a plurality of bags, n be of different sizes, for containing the fluid.

The bag in the body holding fluid can be unsealed to provide access to the fluid and then resealed after a prescribed amount of fluid has been poured therefrom.

In accordance with a further aspect of the invention, the method includes the steps of (a.) providing a body defining an interior volume; (b) disposing a plurality of different sized bags for containing said fluid within said body; (c) storing paint in at least one of the bags; (d) removing a bag storing paint from the body; (e) pouring a measured amount of paint from the bag storing paint into another of the bags; (f) sealing said bag storing paint, after a measured amount has been poured therfrom; and (g) retuning the sealed bag to the body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other aspects of the invention will become apparent after considering several illustrative embodiments, taken in conjunction with the the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the container showing its main parts and features in exploded form;

FIG. 1A is a detailed view of the flip handle attachment point;

FIG. 2 is a cross section of the lid and upper container body in a closed state;

FIG. 3 is a top view of the container with the lid removed;

FIG. 4 is a cross section of the bottom of the container; and

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the container and a flexible swing handle variant;

FIG. 6 is an isometric view of an alternative container showing its main parts and features in exploded form;

FIG. 7A is a side view of a storage bag after removal from the container of FIG. 6.

FIG. 7B is front view of the storage bag of FIG. 7A showing the form that the bag takes when filled with fluid.

FIG. 7C is a bottom view of the storage bag of FIG. 7B

FIG. 8A illustrates the pouring of fluid from the bag of FIG. 7B into an auxiliary container.

FIG. 8B shows the bag of FIG. 7B with an auxiliary handle to facilitate the pouring of fluid from the bag to an auxiliary container.

FIG. 8C is a partial cross-sectional view of the storage bag taken along the lines 8C-8C of FIG. 8B.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A container 10 embodied in accordance with the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 1 in exploded format. The container 10 has a jug-like body 20, illustratively of one-piece plastic construction. The jug body 20 has a hollow interior 21 and a collar 22, and may be blow-molded and made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), and be made resistant to oil-based materials, and the like, by treating the interior with a fluorination process. The body 20 has a plastic screw-type lid 30 with a rim 31 and a turn and stacking member 32. Apertures (not shown) may be included in the member 31 so that it can also serve as a handle.

The lid 30 can be made of commonly available strong, plastic materials such as HDPE, ABS or PVC, and injection molded or fabricated from stock. The embodiment of FIG. 1 also has a rigid swing handle 23 externally mounted onto the body 21 at its ends, and an optional swing handle grasp pad 24 which fits around the middle of the swing handle 23. The swing handle 23 is made of strong, corrosion-resistant metal such as aluminum or stainless steel. The grasp pad 24 is made of a soft, resilient plastic or dense foam rubber material, and is installed either by sliding over the end of the swing handle 23 or through a slit in the grasp. The swing handle 23 is contoured to conform to the outside of the jug body 21 when it is in the downward position, and has a comfortable location from which to carry the container 10 when the handle 23 is in the upward position. The swing handle 23 is contoured to provide good access to the opened body 20 when it is in the upward position.

The top of the lid 30 is shown provided with a ridge 32 that serves a variety of purposes. It can be used to facilitate opening of the container 10 when the lid is threaded on the body part 21, by applying a counterclockwise force as illustrated by the arrow A. The ridge 32 at the top of the lid 30 also serves as a stacking member by which anoterh container (not shown) can be stacked on the container 10 by having its base groove corresponding to the groove 28 in FIG. 1 engage the member 32

Stored within the body 20 is a bag 40 that contains fluid, such as paint. When paint stored in the bag 40 of the body 20 is to be used, the lid 30 is removed and the bag 40 is extracted in the direction indicated by the arrow B to the position of the bag 40′ shown in phantom. Access to the fluid in the extracted bag 40′ is made in any convenient way, for example through a fitting 41″.

FIG. 2 shows a cross section of the lid 30 and the jug upper body in the assembled state. The outer walls of the rim 31 extend upwardly enough to facilitate gripping by a hand for the purpose of manually turning the lid 30. FIG. 2 also illustrates the contained within the body 20 of a fluid filled bag 40 which is removable to fill auxiliary bags, such as bags 42 though 44 with fluid considered sufficient for specified purposes. In this way, the interior of the body 20 does not become soiled, and repeated uses of the bag 40 do not result in unwanted contamination of the fluid in the container 10, despite numerous opening and closings.

The ridge 32 is wide and thick enough to withstand a lateral force used to unscrew the lid 30 from the body 20. The ridge 32 is shown having squared edges to provide suitable support when used to unscrew the lid 30.

The container body 21 also can be provided with an integral, hollow handle (not shown) recessed to fit within the of the body 21. Alternatively, the body 21 can take the form of a quadrilateral, and the integral hollow handle included at the intersection of planar sides. This can provide an efficient overall shipping and shaking volume for the container. A cube shape does not take any more box space than a cylindrical container of the same height, but it contains more volume. The width-to-height aspect ratio of the container 10 is approximately the same as for a conventional paint can in side-to-side dimensions.

As shown in FIG. 3, the top of the container 10 is circular with an external threaded collar extension 22. On the outside of the body 21, two handle ears 25 are shown shaped close to the overall body contour, located opposite one another. A further view of the ears 25 is shown in FIG. 1A, extending from the outside surface of the body 21, providing a support surface 26 approximately parallel and connected to the body 21 on both sides and the top, but not the bottom of the surface. There is a handle hole 27 in the support surface of each ear 25. A space between the support surface and the main part of the body 21 provides room for installation of the ends of the rigid swing handle 23. The ends of the swing handle 23 are bent in an “L” shape, each in the opposite direction of the other, to prevent the swing handle 23 from falling out of the handle ears 25 once assembled with the jug body 21.

As before discussed, one of the important novel features of the container construction of the present invention resides in the containment of the fluid, such as paint, in a re-closable bag within the body 21, instead of having the fluid in contact with the walls of the body 21.

The lid 30, as shown in FIG. 2, has internal threads 33 that mate with the external threads 28 on the collar extension 22 of the body 21. A circular gasket (not shown) can be used between the lid 30 and jug body 21, near the threads of each member. Such a gasket is made of a pliable, compressible material such as soft plastic or rubber, and can seal the container 10 when assembled, by being installed in the lid 30 and retained there by a tightly conforming gasket groove.

FIG. 4 shows a sectional view of the bottom of the jug body 21. An intruding, full diameter integral stacking recess 28 is illustrated as extending from the bottom of the body 21. The recess 28 is sized and shaped to fit within the stacking ridge 32 of the lid 30. This provides stability when one such container 10 is stacked on top of another, unlike the prior art paint cans. The length of the integral stacking recess 28 is the same as the length of the ridge 32 such that the contact made increases lateral locking stability.

Operation of the Container—FIGS. 1-4

The container 10 of the invention is well suited for storage and access of viscous fluids. The presence of the rigid swing handle 23, or either a flexible swing handle or an integral handle, allows multiple one-handed or two-handed positions when holding or carrying the container 10, or extracting material from it. The handles also allow for multiple positions, with one hand holding or carrying the container 10, while accessing the material within it through the opening of the body 20, with the other hand. The shape, size and location of an integral handle would allow different relative positioning of the arm whose hand is holding the integral handle, either straight on, perpendicular to the container 10, or at the side, tangential to the container 10. It would also allow for carrying two containers 10 with one hand of the average sized adult.

The use of the internal bag 40 provides for the minimum amount of spillage from a viscous fluid extracted from the container 10, and no adherence of fluid to any internal surface of the body 20. Accordingly there is no spillage onto the sealing surface at the top of the threaded extension 22 and onto the threads themselves. They are thus kept clean at all times. There is no need to trap viscous fluids extracted from the container 10, which otherwise would drain down the outside of the body 21 onto the threads. There is no need to have a pour spout, drip catch or splash seal 38.

One way a person can open or close the lid 30 of the container 10 is simply to grasp the lid 30 around the ridge 32 with one hand, and the swing handle 23 with the other, and turn the lid 30. Of course, since the invention does not permit viscous fluid or paint top collect between the thread of the lid and the jug body the turning effort is minimal.

Access to the material inside the container 10 is provided by removing the lid 30. There is no need to have wiping edges for wiping off a brush or the like dipped into the fluid in the container 10, or to have fluid wiped off the brush or other device, drain back into the container 10. The material in the container 10 may also be poured out completely, or partially from the bag 40, and into one or more of the storage bags 42-44.

A plurality of the containers 10 may be stacked on top of one another for storage in a stable fashion, facilitated by the stacking ridge 32 in the lid 30 and integral stacking recess 28 on the bottom of the jug body 2, as before described.

Alternate Constructions

It may also be desirable to make the jug body 220 out of two separate pieces, and then use a commercially available adhesive or fasteners integrally to connect them. One likely separation point is at the interface between the externally threaded extension 22 at the top of the body 20. The pieces may then be fabricated with other less expensive techniques than blow molding or injection molding or with less expensive tools and machines. Similarly, the lid 30 may be fabricated by other means as opportunity allows for improved costs, such as stamping or extrusion.

FIG. 5 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the container 10. In this version, a flexible swing handle 50 is mounted at the top of the jug body 20. The flexible swing handle 50 is made of a thick, flexible plastic such as polyethylene, polypropylene, vinyl, or nylon, which allows for repetitive bending and flexing without yielding or breaking. The flexible swing handle 50 has a circular base 52 for mounting on the jug body 20, and two parallel legs 54 extending off the base 52 on opposite sides. Each leg 54 has two locally thinned or pre-grooved sections at a base joint 56 and a mid-joint 55 that act as hinges and allow the flexible swing handle 50 to lay down on the side of the body 20 when it is at rest. It has a straight, integral, swing handle grasp 53 connecting the two legs 54. The inside diameter of the base 52 is slightly smaller than the outside diameter of the threaded extension 22 of the body 21, and mounts in a small circumferential groove just below the threads. The flexible swing handle 50 can be rotated or fixed in its installed position to move the relative position of the handle grasp 53.

Further modifications will also occur to those skilled in this art, and such are deemed to fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Advantages of the Container of the Present Invention

In its objective for improving the dispensing, containment, and handling of fluids such as architectural coatings and the like, the container 10 of the present invention has been particularly optimized for paints, wherein dispensing involves the opening, distribution of contents, and closing of the container 10. Current paint cans, as before explained, require the use of tools such as a screwdriver or the like for opening the lid. Screwdrivers often damage paint can lids and ruin the can seal. Prying open the lid becomes more difficult, the more the can is used. It is much easier to open the lid 30 of the present invention because it is screwed on, and has built-in leverage to tighten and loosen it, and has design features in the opening of the container 10 to prevent the threads from getting contaminated with the fluid from inside. No additional tools are needed, and the handles that are provided for leverage fully retract within, or are already integrally part of the container 10. There is little resistance between the lid 30 and the body 20 so that the lid is easily rotated. Even if a frictional seal is used, once the lid 30 is rotated approximately one third of a turn, the friction seal is released and little resistance is left.

The present invention substantially eliminates paint from reaching the exterior surface of the container 10 during its extraction from the container 10. There is no dripping onto the container exterior, specifically on the threads or label. There is no need to minimize dribble over a spout; to have a non-draining groove or trough behind a spout to trap what little dribble may somewhat occur when there is a spout. Pouring, in accordance with the invention, is thus a vastly cleaner operation that requires no clean-up before closing.

The invention also improves pouring accuracy and comfort, as well. The use of the stored paint bags, such as the bag 40, pours more uniformly than from a conventional paint can. The fluid stream is narrower and more cylindrical. This enables more accurate pouring.

The design of the present invention, furthermore, improves dispensing of paint by brush. Typically it is necessary to use a brush wiped it on one or both sides to remove excess paint after it is dipped into the can. When a brush is wiped against the opening of a conventional paint can, it is difficult to remove all of the excess paint. The invention completely eliminates the need for using a brush to remove paint from a storage container.

As before indicated, conventional paint cans may require a hammer or similar tool for closing. This often damages the friction lid and ruins the seal. In addition, paint splatter is common due to paint left in the trough. After sufficient drying time between repeated uses, dried paint can completely foul the friction lid seal and render the paint can useless for storage. If the lack of a seal is not identified by the user, the contents may congeal or solidify in storage. Although closing and resealing of a plastic container with a threaded lid is an improvement over the conventional metal can, there is still the of content contamination each time a can is opened and then re-sealed and there is still the possibility of having paint on the threads and sealing surfaces.

The invention vastly improves the situation since the threads and sealing surfaces of the container storing the paint remain clean after use. As a result, it will store fluids longer and keep them from becoming contaminated or drying out. There is no concern with any pooling of paint that could cause splattering or fouling of the seal. And there is no need to have any tools for closing.

The design of the container 10 of the invention also improves containment. Fouling of the seal is eliminated and thus preservation of contents is assured. The improved sealing features of the device ensure endurance of the paint quality. The container 10 is preferably of plastic, so the formation of rust, which is common on paint cans, is eliminated By keeping the lid 30 and the body 20 free of paint, seal integrity and clean access are respectively maintained.

Hand transport and general handling of the container 10 of the invention is also superior to conventional paint cans, but the most important result is that the paint accessed by a user can be free from the kind of contamination that occurs when a conventional paint can is repeatedly opened and closed during the course of acting on numerous, different projects. Consequently, the user always has available “absolutely clean” paint.

The invention is also of advantage when used with ordinary metal paint can, such as the paint can 60 of FIG. 6. The paint can 60 has a cylindrical body, illustratively of metal and has a hollow interior 61 for the storage a fluid-containing bag 66. The lid 62 is of conventional paint can construction and made of commonly available material, such as metal. The embodiment of FIG. 6 also has a rigid swing handle 63 externally mounted onto the body of the container 60 at a fitting 65 and contoured to conform to the outside of the can 60. When the fluid stored in the can 60 is to be used, it is withdrawn from the can 60 in the direction indicated by the arrow B′ to, for example, the position of the bag 66′ shown in phantom.

Before the storage bag 66 of FIG. 6 is partially or completely filled and place in the can 60 it takes the form 70 shown in FIG. 7A, which is a side view of a storage bag in collapsed form. The bag 70 includes a top 72 with an access port 73; a base 74 with a handle 75 and a body 71 interconnecting the top 72 and the base 74.

In FIG. 7B the storage bag 70 is shown in front view with the form that the bag takes when fluid is placed I it.

FIG. 7C is a bottom view of the storage bag of FIG. 7B showing the base 74 with an affixed handle to facilitate pouring contents from the bag 70.

FIG. 8A illustrates the pouring of fluid P into an auxiliary container 89 from the bag 80 formed by a base 84 with a handle 85. The top 82 of the bag 80 has a lip 86 that facilitates the pouring operation by having one hand H2 hold the handle 85 attached to the base 84 and another hand H1 hold the lip 86 to elevate the bag 80 and permit pouring from the outlet 87.

FIG. 8B shows the bag 80 of FIG. 8A with an auxiliary handle 85 to facilitate the pouring of fluid from the bag to an auxiliary container.

FIG. 8C is a partial cross-sectional view of the storage bag 80 taken along the lines 8C-8C of FIG. 8B showing the lip 86 that can be grasped in the direction of the arrow C in the pouring operation of FIG. 8A.